What is 616 film?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by winger, Feb 27, 2009.

  1. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    I'm guessing 616 is a variant of 120 like 620 was, but I'm not sure. My neighbor keeps his eyes out for old cameras when he goes to garage sales and flea markets. Today, he stopped by with an Ansco that says it takes 616 film.
     
  2. randerson07

    randerson07 Member

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    I have an Agfa Clipper Special that also uses 616 film, Im not sure what size 616 actually is though. You can fit 120 in there but its not quite tall enough so you need something to shove into the end of the 120 spool to get it to sit tight. I persoanlly cut off the end of a plastic Drywall anchor and rammed it in, it works pretty well as long as you have at least one of the 616 spools. Part of your image with have markings on it like so
    [​IMG]

    winding for the next shot is also tricky, you end up wasting lots of film to make sure your not over lapping.
     
  3. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    No it's a version of 116. Same way 620 was a variant of 120.

    It's 70mm wide but you need backing paper.
     
  4. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    Yes and no. 616 was a small spool version of 116, just like 620 re: 120, as you so properly infer. It was quite popular at one time. It was larger than 120
     
  5. tessar

    tessar Subscriber

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    Going by Wikipedia, the 116 format made exposures measuring 2-1/2 x 4 inches. The 616 format, introduced later, made 2-1/2 x 4-1/4 exposures. The 6 refers to number of exposures per roll.
     
  6. nemo999

    nemo999 Member

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    The full Wikipedia entry:

    616 film was originally produced by Kodak in 1932 along with 620 film for the Kodak Six-16 camera. Seventy millimetres wide, the film produced 2.5 in. × 4.25 in. negatives. It was the same format as that of 116 film but on a slimmer spool, for use in more compact cameras. The format was used in many other cameras such as the Kodak Brownie Junior and the Kodak Target SIX-16. The first "6" in the name refers to the number of frames that could originally be exposed on a single roll of film. To avoid customer confusion, the name was not changed when this was increased to eight exposures. From the 30s on, 616 film became less and less popular, in favor of 120 and other film formats. The film was finally discontinued in 1984, while 620 film was discontinued in 1995.

    Neg size was 2.5 x 4.25 inches, exposures per roll was soon changed to 8.
     
  7. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    Just so happens that I have a Kodak "Target Six-16" camera sitting here. The frame gate on my camera measures 108 mm. x 60 mm., or 4 1/4 x 2 1/2 inches. The length of the spool is 72 mm measured from the outer surfaces of the flanges, and 67 mm. measured from the inner surfaces of the flanges. The core diameter is 7 mm. The flanges themselves are 2.5 mm. thick. It is substantially larger than 120 roll film. I got this camera at least 40 years ago and I've put exactly 1 roll of film through it. I can't remember how many exposures I got from that roll. Six -16 film has been out of production for at least 20 years now, so it is unlikely that I'll ever run another roll through it again. If you're thinking of using it, I'd give it a pass. There are plenty of similar cameras that use 620 and 120 roll film out there selling for only a few dollars. Obviously 120 roll film is still available. Six-20 size has been out of production for a good long while now too, though you may be able to find some from specialty film dealers. The film and paper backing for 120 and 620 are sized identically, only the dimensions of the spool itself are different. Some of the old 620 cameras will accommodate the 120 spool, some won't. No matter, it is a simple matter to re-spool 120 roll film onto a 620 spool. All you need is a darkroom or a changing bag, a supply of 620 spools, a spare 120 spool, and a little bit of tape. Six-20 spools come up on eBay once in a while, but the prices asked are often ridiculous. Whole cameras with a spool (and sometimes even with old film inside) can be found for less than the asking price of the spool alone at garage sales, flea markets, and thrift stores.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 27, 2009
  8. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    Thanks all! I wasn't really figuring this to be a user, but was curious about the size. I'll have to take another look 'cause I think it has a spool in it in case I ever decide to try it. The camera does look to be in good shape and even came with a flash (no bulb), a carrying case, a lens hood, a yellow filter, and the original box and instructions. Not bad for $5. It'll look cute sitting on the shelf with the rest of the collection.
     
  9. Anscojohn

    Anscojohn Subscriber

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    As late as the early 1980s, we still stocked 616 Kodacolor in the retail shop I managed in NW DC. I think it was there to accomodate a couple of the gentry ladies who had once frequented; but I do not recall ever having sold a roll.
     
  10. archphoto

    archphoto Member

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    .............And nobody then could forsee this `rebirth` of old techniques and camera´s.......
    Otherwise you would have kept it in a freezer for some of us.........

    How times change.....

    Peter
     
  11. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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  12. Chazzy

    Chazzy Member

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    Nice photo, Matt. Occasionally, I've been tempted by a Super Ikonta D on eBay. If real 616 or 116 film were available, it would be even more tempting.
     
  13. ghost

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    I have one of those arial plus-x 9.5" rolld from ebay, maybe some film could be cut from that??...I could give it a shot if there is any interest-

    are these cameras that special?

    my Kodak medalist is worth respooling 120 to the 620 spools because it has a great 100mm lens- I sure wish someone still sold 620 though.
     
  14. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    The Medalist sure is a nice camera. I know a fellow who has one and I've got to tell you, that is one damn fine lens on that camera. The rangefinder is easy to use too - very crisp and clear. He had his modified to accept 120 spools. The conversion isn't drastic, shouldn't cost much to have done, and works perfectly.
     
  15. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

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    Way too big. Unperforated 70mm. But then the backing paper and spools :confused:
     
  16. Wade D

    Wade D Member

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    I have an old Kodak 616 box camera I got from my parents years ago. Once I found a couple of rolls that fit it in the late 70's and tried it out. The slides came out OK but were very soft focus due to the fairly cloudy plastic lens on the camera. I never tried re-spooling any other film for it. It now has a place on my shelves of collectibles.
     
  17. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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  18. mwdake

    mwdake Member

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    I think Film for Classics stopped selling direct and only sell thorugh the likes of BH Photo and Central Camera.
    You may want to sit down while you look at the price.
     
  19. paul ron

    paul ron Member

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    But it is avaialable if you want it. Yes B&H is one of the sellers. Isn't it worth putting a few rolls through your Medalist n other classic cameras? You betcha!
     
  20. mhcfires

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    You can pick up a few old rolls of 116 on ebay and use the backing paper and spools with unperfed 70mm. Wouldn't be too hard that way.