what is a good flash for nikon F3, and F100

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by vedmak, Dec 6, 2010.

  1. vedmak

    vedmak Subscriber

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    I recently got a sekonic flash meter, and now want to go shoot some pics where the flash would be needed, what would be a good one that I can use with either camera? I am thinking to use it with a cord, rather than mounted on the camera
     
  2. CGW

    CGW Member

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    Frankly, I'd consider making your F100 your designated flash camera. Why? The F3 has a slow max synch speed(1/80), requires either an F3-only SB-16a flash(plus dedicated flash cord) or an AS-17 adapter for TTL with speedlights that will work with an F100 like the SB24/25/28. The F100's abilities with flash metering and fill are vastly superior to the early '80s technology of the F3--its many virtues(and I own 2)notwithstanding. You can, of course, work with these newer speedlights on the F3 as a manual flash with the cheaper AS-4 adapter. Complicated, no?
     
  3. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    Get an old handle mount unit like Sunpak 544, 611, 622 or Metz 45 or 60 series. Use the sync cord and the pc sync socket on the camera. There won't be any dedication functions no TTL but that's what you want as you have a new flash meter.
     
  4. vedmak

    vedmak Subscriber

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    great, thank you for that, I was thinking about sunpak, but will check out Metz as well:smile:
     
  5. lxdude

    lxdude Member

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    An excellent suggestion. They're powerful and cheap. And rugged. You could get TTL with the F3. But the flash meter is better anyway, IMO.
     
  6. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    The Sunpak 383 is nice and cheap, and compact. It has variable power and can take several accessories, including a diffuser/filter holder. You'll need a separate handle mount for it if you want to move the light off center (which you probably do). If your situation allows you to place the light on a stand or have an assistant hold it, even better. For a potato masher, I'd suggest the 555 as the best bang for the buck.
     
  7. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    Look at the Nikon SB800 and Nikon SB900.

    Steve
     
  8. JSebrof

    JSebrof Member

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    If you really want to dive into the world of flash photography, check out the group over at strobist.blogspot.com I've been following them for years and while I haven't done much with flashes yet myself, you can seriously learn a lot there, including the relative merits of all sorts of lighting equipment.
     
  9. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I have two Metz 45 CT-3s. This particular model (not true for other 45CT series) have low voltage trigger so these are completely safe for all modern cameras. Automatic exposure mode works reasonably well but effectiveness is very dependent on the subject. In manual mode, power adjustment is rather limited. You can go full blast, 1/2, 1/4, and 1/16 (in W 'Winder' mode). These are very durable EXCEPT for the flimsy PC sync cord. These are pretty cheap and abundant.
     
  10. CGW

    CGW Member

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    Just be aware that many of these old flashes touted above can have whopping trigger voltages that could stir-fry your F100s electronics. Strobist is a great site but most of their set-ups are reliant on radio slaves--a good way to get around the voltage issue with old flash gear.
     
  11. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    CGW gets it! That is why is specifically recommended the Nikon SB800 and Nikon SB900.
     
  12. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    One further warning - some of the radio slave receivers are also sensitive to higher trigger voltages. It is, of course, better to fry a receiver than it is to fry a camera.
     
  13. vedmak

    vedmak Subscriber

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    what is the safe Metz flash would be ? Metz 60CT-4 ok?
     
  14. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    This site has a lot of useful information, and seems to have remained current over time:

    http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html

    It indicates that the 60CT-4 should be fine.
     
  15. Chan Tran

    Chan Tran Member

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    I used the Metz 60CT4 with the Nikon F3 and F5 all the time and there is no problem. I also used it with the FM as well as the coolpix 5000 with no problem. Buying the SB600 and or SB900 is a waiste of money especially you want to use the new flash meter. I have the right adapters so that I can use the 60CT4 in TTL mode with both the F3 and the F5 but it's much more fun to use it in manual mode with the flash meter. The CT4 in manual mode has power settings from full power down to 1/256 power in 1/3 stop increments. A total of 27 steps.
     
  16. mablo

    mablo Member

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    F100 is so good with a Nikon TTL flash that you won't need anything else. Read the manual carefully and be happy.
     
  17. totalmotard

    totalmotard Member

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    I use a pair of SB600s with my N80. You can get a wireless commander and position them anywhere you like. Nikon's flash tech is the best, bar none. I've used an assistant as a walking light stand at weddings.
     
  18. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    With the SB600, SB800 or SB900, there is no reason to buy a flash meter. Better to spend the money on film.
     
  19. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

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    Maybe a better thread title would be "What is a good flash for my new Sekonic Flash Meter?"

    A good flash for an F3/F100 would be one that uses the TTL capabilities of either camera to the max. Which leaves no room at all for a flash meter.

    Flash meters go well with studio flash, not on-camera flash.

    The most cost-effective studio flash units are 'monolights'.

    Alien Bees are highly thought of. However, there are lots of really cheap Chinese monolight kits flooding the market.
     
  20. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    No matter how "sophisticated" it is, TTL flash is still metered through the lens based on reflected light from the subject. It has the same inherent drawback of all TTL metering systems; no number of fancy features or computer programming short of a direct linkup to the shooter's brain will ever be able to overcome it. Namely, the problem is less than ideal, but mostly passable, subject/composition-based exposures most of the time. On the other hand, you will almost always get an ideal exposure with a correctly-used incident flash meter, regardless of the details of the subject/composition that will throw a reflected meter astray.

    I do agree that using a flash to shoot hand held moving things at constantly changing distances and compositions is not conducive to using a hand-held light meter, and the advantages of TTL flash metering may outweigh its disadvantages in this case. I was assuming that the OP knew this, and had more planned out, off-camera flash use in mind.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 7, 2010
  21. 23mjm

    23mjm Member

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    Wrong on the SB900 it is NOT compatible with older TTL. The only film camera it will work TTL style with is the F6. Nikon abandon all us older film camera users. The SB600 or SB800 are your best bet, or you could look thrid party.
     
  22. dng88

    dng88 Member

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    a) why use sync cord? use a cheap wireless remote for off-camera is better IMHO
    b) for some poster suggesting TTL, may I suggest that using a flash meter is a must outside; unlike digital, you are not sure and cannot adjust based on histogram/LCD. Have a lot of case seeing the result of TTL (2xSB600 and 1 x SB800) is not good enough. The flash meter measure both the overall light and the flash light. It helps quite a bit. The comment is right that this kind of measure is only for those subject that can use incidence light.
     
  23. andrewkirkby

    andrewkirkby Member

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    Cheap and powerful.