What is large size portrait

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by Daniel-OB, Aug 16, 2007.

  1. Daniel-OB

    Daniel-OB Member

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    Some portrait photographers here said like: "I make only large prints in my portraits works".

    I am new in portrait business so still a lot of problems. For now I am set for up to 20x24" prints. Frame for this print can be really large 29"x35", I THINK. The intent is to make portraits in my studio and in customers house too so it will get around head and shoulder and up to whole figure and even groups of people.

    So what paper size one portraitist could consider as "large". This should revolve aruond something that is acceptible for dry wall (weight sake) house and to fit nicely into the same. In my mind are mostly 16x20 and 20x24" papers.

    Thanks to anyone for your time.
     
  2. Cheryl Jacobs

    Cheryl Jacobs Member

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    I would consider 16x20 and 20x24 to be mid-sized. "Large" for my clients is more like 24x30 and up.

    In my opinion, it's more important to consider the specific image and the specific space in which it is to be hung. A 16x20 on a very small wall would look big; a 30x40 on a massive wall would like small.

    - CJ
     
  3. Daniel-OB

    Daniel-OB Member

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    Thanks Cheril.
    As I know you use 4.5x6 negatives. Enlarging factor for, say, 30x40 is around 18.2 if you use your frame 100% (no crop). Do you have grain problem with customers, and how your Bronica lenses performs at that enlargement. I use 56x72 negatives most of the time with Mamiya and Rodenstock lenses. Just thinking to expand or not my max print set.

    Thank you Cheril again. You are so good photographer.

    www.Leica-R.com
     
  4. CBG

    CBG Member

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    My three cents: How big can you sell? Bigger should equal more money to you and be more impressive as a presentation.

    Years ago a portrait teacher said he often used to put up a really big print of a customer at an easel in the front room of his studio when the customer was coming in for an appointment to see the results of a session. The print, he would tell the customer, just looked so good he was using it to show other people how good a portrait he could do. It wasn't something the customer had ordered - just a really great shot. He said the customers would often buy the print. It was the equivalent of "spec work", i.e. speculative, but often worked.

    Best,

    C
     
  5. bjorke

    bjorke Member

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    Some person hanging out near
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  6. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi Daniel,

    Large prints are generally hung to be viewed from a greater distance, so while the finest grain is always desirable, it's not as critical in a very large print as you might think. Of course its all subjective, but you can get away with more. As St. Ansel used to say "hang the big print over the piano."

    best,

    J
     
  7. eddym

    eddym Member

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    Largest portrait I ever made was a 36x72 inch color print of a young ballerina. The mother had it framed and mounted on a staircase wall at the entrance to the ballroom where they celebrated the girl's 16th birthday. I had shot it with a Rolleiflex TLR, and the girl was "life-size" in the photo. It really did look like she was standing there in the flesh, greeting you in a ballet pose.
    It was one of my best works.
     
  8. Christopher Nisperos

    Christopher Nisperos Member

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    (apologies to Daniel for editing your post!/cn)

    Hi Daniel,

    Just curious as to what type of lighting you'll be using? Also, will you be using the same equipment and techniques in your studio as you will for the portraits you make on-location?

    Best,

    Christopher

    .