What is the most archival process for photographic preservation.

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by waynecrider, Jun 28, 2005.

  1. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

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    I am currently printing Ziatypes. I've read that they can have a pretty long life, something on the order of a Platinum print, (?) but considering the paper, I was wondering what the life could be? Everything seems to deteriorate eventually. If you were to create a picture to have the longest life possible, what would it be? Prerhaps a painting? They seem to stick around for quite a long time. But concerning photography, what is your archival process.
     
  2. George Papantoniou

    George Papantoniou Member

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    For what I know, pt/pd on a good quality paper is top. What do you mean, "considering the paper" ? I guess that the papers used for those prints are strong and stable and will not deteriorate in the next 1000 years... unless you store them in a very, very strange place...
     
  3. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    As you say it all depends on the paper and how well it was processed. Some pt/pd are yellowing out because they were cleared with Hydrochloric acid and were not properly washed, this was back in the early days of pt/pd. With modern day methods, a pt/pd print will last as long as the paper is intact, the image will not fade or break down. Ziatypes should last just as long, pd is a noble metal and if processed well, it should have the same longevity as a pt/pd print.

    Another process that has long life it carbon printing (no, I dont mean ink jet prints), but care most be taken that non contaminated gelatin is used.
     
  4. Joe Lipka

    Joe Lipka Member

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    How about a cave drawing? Thousands of years and still going strong.

    Photographically, I think Pt/Pd on good rag paper is probably the most archival.

    The real question is whether or not the image is worthy of such a long life...
     
  5. Gerald Koch

    Gerald Koch Member

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    I would say the Daguerrotype since you are dealing with metals and no organic support.
     
  6. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

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    Cave drawings might be the best. I did see a travel show last week or so that showed cave drawings in France I believe, that were really old. In that case, how much ARE caves nowdays?

    What processes are you guys using? Hypo clearing and selenium?
     
  7. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

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  8. Robert Hall

    Robert Hall Subscriber

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    Daguerreotypes, no, they are silver on copper. Both are fugitive metals. They may have a little less longevity than that of a silver print.

    The Platinotype is bonded to the paper. We have papers over 1500 years. I would say the pt/pd processes are your best bet.
     
  9. Gerald Koch

    Gerald Koch Member

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    The only thing that is going to effect a Daguerreotype is hydrogen sulfide, as it would any silver image even one on paper. But with paper you must also deal with mold, mildew, book worm, silverfish, ...
     
  10. waynecrider

    waynecrider Member

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    How are those 1500 year old papers being stored?
     
  11. Tom Hoskinson

    Tom Hoskinson Member

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    Tens of thousands of years for paintings done with hematite or carbon pigments on dry walls of caves.
     
  12. glbeas

    glbeas Member

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    I've seen and heard of photos done on tile and fired with a glaze. That comes about as close to permanent as I can think of. When I figure out how to do it I'll write up something on it, one of my slow moving projects.
     
  13. Mateo

    Mateo Subscriber

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    I can't believe you guys skipped the obvious: mosaics made of naturally occurring stones. And I hear that Epson is coming out with a spray that will protect them even further.

    Seriously, your Ziatypes will last a long time.