What is the rarest camera/lens you own?

Discussion in 'Antiques and Collecting' started by darinwc, Dec 22, 2016.

  1. BMbikerider

    BMbikerider Member

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    Minolta XE1, I don't think many were made and they have been out of production for at least 25 years which will make them quite rare in fulkl working order. For the lens, a Minolta 28/85 MD lens fitted to the same camera. MD lenses must be horded somewhere because you hardly ever see any of the really good ones.
     
  2. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Electronic flash equipment made in the UK by Dawe Instruments Ltd was on sale through their French agents by 1947, studio as well as portable, Promesur V. Spahn, 23 Rue Clapeyron, Paris. 8e. I've just checked 1946,7,8 & 9 BJP Almanacs and electronic studio and portable flash is adverts first in the 1947 BJPA (published late 1946). This would coincide with when I think the camera was actually made.

    Ian
     
  3. Andy38

    Andy38 Member

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    Thanks Ian, for the information.

    I also modified my post #100 : "The turning knob (2) adjusts the speed of descent of the mirror before shutter firing."
    It's rising, of course, not descent...
     
  4. AgX

    AgX Member

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    And why does one want to adjust that speed?
     
  5. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    It's a very interesting camera, I have a few early large/medium format SLRs, Thornton Pickard, Dallmeyer (actually a re-badged Ensign), Ensign, Soho, Graflex but yours is a lot rarer and more enigmatic:D

    Looking at other cameras from the same manufacturer they appear to be quite experimental, a bit quirky, Dawe also made cameras as well as early studio and portable flash units and weren't a long lived company they seem to have only lasted 7-8 years they'd gone bt 1954.

    I have 3 Camera books from Focal Press from the 50's and early 60's essentially taking data from their Camera Guides and there's so many short lived companies after WWII, often making complete system cameras. They only cover 35mm, 120 and Subminiature so no LF cameras unfortunately.

    My gut feeling is your camera is late 1940's, so can use early studio flash or conventional tungsten modelling light (or daylight), you need the mirror to close earlier with tungsten lights or daylight to help dampen vibration, it's almost irrelevant with flash.

    Ian
     
  6. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    I suggest the mirror might need to be raised early to help dampen vibration with daylight and tungsten studio lighting. On most my British early MF and LF SLRs the first action of the shutter release is to lift the mirror, you can only trigger the shutter once it's totally lifted, but it's my own pressure lifting the mirror, If this is done by a spring after triggering the shutter vibration will be very much higher.

    Ian
     
  7. Denverdad

    Denverdad Subscriber

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    No problem. It's nothing to do with that particular lens but instead has to do with use of 35mm film. After trying out medium format I realized that having the larger piece of film was the way I wanted to go for landscape photography. At the same time I found that for birds and wildlife my Canon FD teles worked great with mirrorless digital, so I wasn't interested in 35mm for that any more either. So in general for my particular photographic interests I pretty much just ran out of reasons for 35mm film and consequently stopped using my Canon FD bodies.
     
  8. MultiFormat Shooter

    MultiFormat Shooter Member

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    Thanks for the information! It certainly makes sense. Plus with the mirrorless system there is crop factor so your lens "becomes longer" which is big help for birding.
     
  9. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    My WideLux F7 is not rare but unusual.
     
  10. mshchem

    mshchem Member

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    I have a mint 105mm Bellows Nikkor. When fitted on a PB-4 bellows you can focus to infinity. I'm not really sure why you would want to go walking around with your Nikon F, with bellows, and a lens, shooting distant landscapes but you could. Maybe a Geek's way of showing off to the Ladies?
    Mike
     
  11. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    For twenty years my rarest lens was a 21mm f/2.8 Rokkor lens. It was like walking around with a headlight on my chest.