What is this thingie?

Discussion in 'Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by AndersPS, Oct 14, 2009.

  1. AndersPS

    AndersPS Member

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  2. Denis P.

    Denis P. Member

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    Anders, that's a Zone VI viewing filter. Google it for more information.
    It's supposed to help you visualise the tonality in B&W.
    Doesn't work for everybody (haven't tried one myself, so I can't say anything about its usability).

    Denis
     
  3. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    It's the same thing as a Kodak Wratten #90 filter. Never tried it, either.
     
  4. Jeff Searust

    Jeff Searust Member

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    been there, done that.

    I have watched Fred's tapes on printing and on taking pictures. I have also tried the filter thing. if you get a chance, the tape on printing is brilliant, and will make you depressed for at least a day thinking that you are never going to be that good...LOL

    A yellow filter is a good thing to use to visualize a scene, but I have found that unless you are using it in rather bright light, it is somewhat useless-- give it a try sometime. You can also sometimes find them on the evil-bay.
     
  5. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Excellant video!

    Jeff
     
  6. AndersPS

    AndersPS Member

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    I found one on fleebay, but it was for 4x5...does it matter if I use this when I shoot in 135mm film?

    Offtopic: where could I read about Fred Picker? I want to know more about him. Stupid question...I just gonna Google him. But ifI don´t find anything useful on google, where do you think I can read more?

    ///Anders S
     
  7. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    The viewing filter can be used for any format, since the intent is only to approximate B&W tonality in a scene.

    Slightly OT, but there is a Fred Picker print for sale in the insight photography project fund raising auction. See http://www.insight-photography.org/The_In-Sight_Photography_Project.html
    The gallery hosting the event is in Fred's old stomping grounds (Brattleboro, VT).
     
  8. juan

    juan Subscriber

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    Fred wrote a series of newsletters from about 1977 until about 1995. About a year ago someone here was investigating having them all scanned to pdfs, then hosting them at a university site. Calument (which owns the rights) was considering allowing it, but I don't know the status of the project.

    The viewing filter was also used to frame a scene - thus the different formats. But the viewing filter was the same in all. I use my 35mm for my 8x10 camera.

    If you can find the Zone VI Newsletters, you can learn a great deal about Fred - from his own pen. Try it.
     
  9. Doug Webb

    Doug Webb Member

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    The Zone VI viewing filter can be very helpful if you have realistic expectations and know what it is actually supposed to do. It helps in determining whether you might want to use, for example, a yellow, green, or red filter to separate tones in the scene. In a shot of a green and red pepper side by side with color film there is a dramatic difference between the two visually, but in a black and white print they may look nearly identical, depending on the black and white film you choose. When you look at the scene through the Zone VI filter, it will help you approximate what a black and white print of that scene wil look like and whether a filter would produce the separation you are hoping for.
    The Zone VI filter takes a little getting used to and will not perfectly render what every black and white film will produce, but could be worth trying out in terms of helping you visualize results.
    Good luck with it if you do try it.
    Doug Webb
     
  10. AndersPS

    AndersPS Member

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    When I look thru the Zone-filter, can I put a yellow, red or a green filter in front of it and get the result, or is it just trial and error until I know what filter to use? many qustions, but I want to be sure before I buy one and if I have any use for it in my photobag:smile:

    ///Anders S
     
  11. JPD

    JPD Member

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    How about a digital compact camera with a mode for black and white? Just point at the subject and view it in b/w on the LCD-screen. If you're satisfied, go ahead and use the REAL camera. :D
     
  12. Denis P.

    Denis P. Member

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    That's a very good idea, actually (just tried it myself - and it works!).
    And, paradoxically, it's probably even cheaper than the Zone VI viewing filter :smile:
     
  13. Ponysoldier

    Ponysoldier Member

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    Viewing through the combined Wratten 90 and selected filter you do get a reasonable approximation of the filter's effects on the tonal reproduction in black and white. It is often helpful to view the ground-glass through the filter (rather than viewing the scene directly) because of the isolation (and inversion) which allows a very good assessment of the tonal distribution. The Wratten 90 (or Zone VI Viewing Filter) is quite effective at evaluating the merge of tones.