What printing process was this?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by MattKrull, Sep 12, 2013.

  1. MattKrull

    MattKrull Subscriber

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    First and foremost, I'm sorry if this isn't the right subforum. It could just as easily go in the colour subforum, but since I haven't seen this in a long time, I'm guessing it is more of an alternative process. Also sorry for not having pictures, although that would make describing this easier.

    In my grand parents' house there used to be a painting of a schooner done using some sort of metalic paint that had a very particular reflective property, almost like chrome was mixed right into the paint. I have no idea what it was, but it mesmerized me as a small child (not a hard feat, most shiny things did, but I digress).

    A few years ago I saw a photo print that had the same effect. It was a colour print where the vibrant colours seemed to be made of metal. This is far more than simply a high gloss paper. I asked the photographer at the time what it was and all he said was it was an old process and he had it done by a (now dead) fellow in a small town many miles away. He couldn't remember the name of the process. I do believe it was shot on normal film (though negative or slide I don't know).

    I expect this process is all but dead - it was probably horrifically toxic (it really does look like it had chrome mixed right into the ink or paper). But they way it presented colours was breath-taking and utterly unique. The way to presented fall colours was amazing and I'd love ot have access to it for some of my prints.

    The closest thing I've been able to find via Google are the digital prints onto Aluminium (which, while off topic, I'd love to hear from anyone who's had first hand experience with those, how do they compare to a colour enlargement?). Does anyone know what I'm talking about, and if so, where I can find out more about it or if any places still do it?

    Thanks
     
  2. Kevin Kehler

    Kevin Kehler Member

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    Ilfochrome prints can look like that in person - on the web, they look like colour prints but in person, can display a vibrancy which looks like aluminum.
     
  3. OzJohn

    OzJohn Member

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    I think I know what you are talking about as regards paintings but have not seen the effect in a photograph. There is "metallic" RA4 colour paper around today that actually contains no metal at all but which is much favoured by photographers to impart a metallic-like sheen particularly to brightly coloured objects such as cars. Looks good on some portraits too. You can get prints on this paper and on aluminium as well as various acrylic substrates from just about any prolab. OzJohn
     
  4. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    Kodak Endura Metallic. It's got a layer of what looks like little metal blobs behind the RA4 emulsion, which makes it glow when direct-lit. It looks like a print on aluminium, but actually it's just paper.
     
  5. MattKrull

    MattKrull Subscriber

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    Thanks guys. I asked my local lab and they do metallic colour prints. I've got a couple of landscapes I want to get enlarged, so I'm going to trying them on that to see what happens (most are bright vivid colours, but one is really dark, a mountain in a snow storm, I'm very curious to see how it turns out).
     
  6. polyglot

    polyglot Member

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    The metallic works very well with saturated colours in the midtones but it tends to lose both highlight and shadow detail. And it looks pretty poor for B&W IMHO. Don't use it for subtle photos :wink:
     
  7. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    It can be okay for black and white images of subjects that are full of glass or, not surprisingly, metal.