What Size? Image Size on the Paper

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by dancqu, Mar 7, 2010.

  1. dancqu

    dancqu Member

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    I've the impression that with most mounted prints
    image size is less than paper size. In most cases an
    eight x ten or eleven x fourteen stated to be that size
    have actually an image size less than that. How far can
    one go in under sizing the image and still claim paper
    size to be the size of the picture?

    Is this an issue of honesty in marketing? Dan
     
  2. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    With anything I have ever done, I list the actual dimensions of a trimmed and mounted print (in centimeters, rounded to nearest half cm), or the paper dimension for a loose or overmatted print (in inches). The way I see it, a print that is not trimmed, but is simply overmatted to frame the image, may be described by the size of the paper, but anything that is trimmed should be described by the actual dimensions of the image.

    I am sure it all comes down to the standards in place at the joint that is stating the dimensions.
     
  3. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    I don't think it's about honesty if an image is sold as: 5X7" image on 20X24 paper. 5X7/8X10 etc.
    With the proper marketing you might get rich selling 9mm(Minox) contact prints on 16X20 paper.
    Say it loud enough & long enough & someone will declare you the world's greatest.
    Generally the wide borders are insurance from bent edges and damage from non-archival
    processing or contamination.
     
  4. jmcd

    jmcd Member

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    I call an 8x10 contact print 8x10, because 7-5/8 x 9-5/8 sounds awkward. I would expect that if the image were being sold at Christie's, the actual dimensions would be used, in part just to authenticate the print with regard to method of production and date. Same would go for a book such as a retrospective.

    So, I don't think the terminology has anything to do with (dis)honesty in marketing, as most prints are not sold by the square inch. Of course, I would not call a print that measured less than 5x7 an 8x10.

    Some people do print with big borders because the prints look much like they are matted, and this makes for a much lighter portfolio for carrying and mailing, as opposed to all the added weight of the mat board.
     
  5. jmcd

    jmcd Member

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    You can print an image to 60 percent of the image size (say 6"x8") and still call it an 8x10.
     
  6. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    By what standard?
     
  7. DanielStone

    DanielStone Member

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    his 2f :D
     
  8. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    ...exactly what I was trying to squeeze out of him...unless it really is some sort of specific standard across which he has run somewhere, in which case, I would want to know who's standard it is!
     
  9. Dan Henderson

    Dan Henderson Member

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    I describe my prints by the actual image size, such as 7-1/2 x 9-1/2 inches. My fear is that a non-photographer buyer would not understand the borders required by the printing easel and might think that I was deliberately overstating the print size.