What to do with Seattle Film Works (ECN2) stock?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by keyofnight, Dec 22, 2012.

  1. keyofnight

    keyofnight Member

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    So, I picked up a couple rolls of Seattle Film Works 5247, dated March 1990—from an estate sale. They were only charging 25cents for two, so I figured I couldn't go wrong.

    I hear this stock has an anti-halation layer on it that can harm the average C41 machine or working solution. Where can I get this stuff developed, and what would you guys do if you had a couple rolls of this stuff sitting around? (Don't say, "Throw it away!")
     
  2. thegman

    thegman Member

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    I've read that Richard Photo Lab can process movie film, maybe give them an email.
     
  3. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    throw it out. it's likely quite fogged.
    or search ecn2 here and find many threads answering all your questions about movie film in a still camera.
     
  4. brianmquinn

    brianmquinn Member

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  5. Mustafa Umut Sarac

    Mustafa Umut Sarac Member

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    keyoffight,

    Google , short cut movie film. You can buy FRESH movie film for same price today.
     
  6. kevs

    kevs Member

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    Use it to practice loading a spiral, for testing cameras. Or spray it with syrup/treacle and hang it from the ceiling to catch flies...
     
  7. keyofnight

    keyofnight Member

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  8. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    Not likely worth the trouble. Movie film, even properly processed, generally disappoints compared to color films. But if it sounds fun, enjoy the adventure.
     
  9. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    Agreed, don't bother with it, unless you like experimenting, (or keep it as a collectable). I remember this sustem at the time...seemed a great idea to get slides and prints from the same film, but it proved a compromise that didn't do either job well as using the correct film for each purpose.

    Kodak in the UK used to offer a service for "Kodacolor transparencies" from colour negs. I still have some of these slides from sets which my Dad did for work purposes, where maybe a dozen of each pic was needed....they are very good when seen on their own, but don't have the sparkle or depth of colour of a reversal film.
     
  10. frobozz

    frobozz Subscriber

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    Let me know if you're successful at that. They seem to have gone off the grid (or maybe it's just my calls and emails Karl's not returning.)

    Duncan
     
  11. Bob Eskridge

    Bob Eskridge Member

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    My slides taken in the 1970's faded to nothing. Thank goodness I used Kodachrome mostly.
     
  12. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Ditto
     
  13. Paul Verizzo

    Paul Verizzo Member

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    Forget it, best advice is to make flypaper from it.

    You can successfully get color neg images using C-41 kit at home, plus manual removal of the anti-halation layer. But no telling how the colors will curve out. I've done it, just for fun.

    The problem is, what's next? It is a low contrast film intended to be "printed" onto a high contrast reversal material. Kodak's Vericolor 5022, IIRC, was a low volume film that would do that. Kodak also had a number of different "print" films over the years to make the movies.

    Being low contrast, prints never came out very well. I had this done, with slides, for years from Identicolor in North Hollywood. Ditto RGB color, and they would make the "print" slides from any C-41 film very nice.

    Maybe you could scan the negs into something usable, but the flypaper advice is still the best.

    Bottom line, why bother?
     
  14. keyofnight

    keyofnight Member

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    You folks are right. I'm just going to use it to practice spooling film. (;
     
  15. wogster

    wogster Member

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    If you aren't sure how to spool film on a steel reel, perfect practice material.....
     
  16. keyofnight

    keyofnight Member

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    I do it pretty well, but I'd like to practice it so I can reduce the possibility of screwing it up in the future. (;
     
  17. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    Last week I found a couple of rolls I shot in he 70s, from I recall the selling point was to get both negatives and slides from the same roll. Both the slides and the negatives are faded, the prints from the oringial negatives were very gainey and high contrast and starting to fad, looks like they were printed on GAF paper. At any rate I would not bother to shoot and then pay for the addtional process.