What you can see in a bunch of thumbnails

Discussion in 'Photographers' started by mark, May 18, 2011.

  1. mark

    mark Member

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    As a lowly poor member I can only see thumbnails. There was a thread recently that a little out of hand and people started whipping out their resumes. I went to several or the galleries to get a better understanding of their prowess. I was shocked by what I saw. So, I went to lots of people's galleries. It was an interesting excercise.

    It was cool to see things in thumbneails with several on a page. Too small to see the details but plenty big enough to see the compositional elements. What I think of as the geometry of the image (focal point, line, shape, light/dark, balance) really stood out. I also could see connections between images. Those I would call the more experienced (Don't read professional photographer into this because I don't know who is and who is not professional) behind the lens had a unifying nature to their images. They were fluid, yet connected. Some I found a new found respect for and others, whom I have been blown away by on a single image basis, became boring, and stagnant. Like they are taking the same 3 photographs 20 or 30 times and posting them.

    From there I took a look at my own and woof! I got some work to do.

    Try it sometime. Find your favorite APUG photographer's gallery or just take a stroll through the populace and look at their thumbnails only. It is an interesting excercise, then look at your own.
     
  2. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

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    Since I was the only person I know of that whipped out a resumé in that thread, I can only assume you looked at mine. I am not going to ask what you thought of my stuff posted here because I may not like the answer, but I haven't put anything up in a long time since I use my site for showing work. In regards to your own images, I don't think you need as much work as you think. You may not put much up, but what is there is nicely done. Shoot more, look at more, and be open minded about the intent of the photograph. That is the best way to make better photographs.
     
  3. mark

    mark Member

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    You weren't the only one and there were lots of people on that thread. That thread was just what started the browse through the thumbnail galleries. I went through lots of them. There is no reason to name names or voice opinions about people's work. I thought it was a great way to get another insight into others as photographers as well as myself. Thought I would pass on the exercise.

    As another thought from a want a be collector's point of view. I saw some people whose work a buyer could just keep buying because of the connected fluidity of the pieces. Others, if you bought 2 or 3 images you have the breadth of their work, no matter how much they produced.

    As a teacher I can see the extreme value of this excercise as a means for students to discuss an artists dominant compositional structure.
     
  4. Greg Davis

    Greg Davis Member

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    I agree 100%. Sometimes it happens not just with a single person's work, but a school. A few years back the a certain Ivy League college dominated the gallery scene because the director had good connections. Galleries like work that is safe and they know will sell; that is, they don't like surprises. All the students were getting shown in these major galleries because they were considered safe. You could practically swap their names on the photographs they were so similar.