When did Kodak start to discontinue it's films?

Discussion in 'Product Availability' started by RGS122, Dec 28, 2009.

  1. RGS122

    RGS122 Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2009
    Location:
    Fresno, CA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Did it start after 2000? I was wondering because I have Ektachrome 160T that was expired in 2005 and I have Elite Chrome 160T that was expired in 2003. They surely don't make these anymore and I was wondering when they started the cuts. Also what other types of film did they carried?
     
  2. wiltw

    wiltw Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,071
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Location:
    SF Bay area
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Kodak has always been discontinuing films, as new technology in emulsions would outdate one emulsion and be replaced by another one.

    If you are asking about films dropping in demand and being discontinued due to the advent of digital, that particular phenomenon probably came about when 35mm film could adequately be replaced by digital image quality for digital cameras to replace film cameras for most uses, at reasonable cost...about 6-7 years ago.
     
  3. Tom Kershaw

    Tom Kershaw Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,947
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2004
    Location:
    South Norfol
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Although with careful attention to detail one can get excellent quality from 35mm.
     
  4. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,090
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, N
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The biggest drop in sales of all analog products world-wide came in about 2005. This is when Ilford and Agfa underwent their problems, and Kodak discontinued the manufacture of all B&W papers. There was about a 35% drop in one single quarter alone.

    PE
     
  5. Ektagraphic

    Ektagraphic Member

    Messages:
    2,893
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2009
    Location:
    Southeastern
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    black and white currently seem to be doing pretty well from all I have gathered so I wonder if Kodak regrets giving up the black and white paper.....
     
  6. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,090
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, N
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Well, when I asked Antonio Perez face to face a similar question he replied "Ron, we were hemorrhaging out of the paper business and it just could not continue." At that time, there was no upswing visible that would sustain the large effort in making and coating paper. Film was strong, but paper was poor in sales.
     
  7. Tom Kershaw

    Tom Kershaw Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,947
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2004
    Location:
    South Norfol
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Ron,

    Do you have any thoughts on the disconnect between Kodak film and paper sales?

    Tom
     
  8. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,090
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, N
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Not a clue Tom and it seems that no one at Kodak does either. It is one of those imponderable events that confounds everyone. B&W film sales at EK remain strong from what I hear. B&W paper sales fell to abysmal levels. Maybe it was the huge product range? They did have trouble supporting all of those paper types.

    PE
     
  9. fotch

    fotch Member

    Messages:
    4,821
    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Location:
    SE WI- USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Maybe the shift to scanning rather than printing cause the drop in paper sales. At first glance, many may have thought it the way to go. Seems like the comment "returning to the darkroom" is becoming more common now a days.

    Just a thought.
     
  10. tim elder

    tim elder Member

    Messages:
    146
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've only been printing for about a decade, but Kodak's black & white paper never seemed popular to me; almost everyone around me was always using Ilford or Agfa paper, even though I never got a real reason for people's dislike of it. I wasn't that surprised when they dropped it.

    -Tim
     
  11. SchwinnParamount

    SchwinnParamount Member

    Messages:
    1,180
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2004
    Location:
    Tacoma, WA
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I don't understand the disconnect either. My favorite paper has been Polymax Fine Art and I've been buying old stock when I could get it. A decent alternative is the Ilford papers of course.
     
  12. RGS122

    RGS122 Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2009
    Location:
    Fresno, CA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Thanks for answering my question, I was talking about the whole digital thing, it appears that 2004 was the year then. I wish that I got into film before 2004, but then I was only a teenager. Now I'm close to 20 and care about it now, to me it seems a little too late. But at least I get to shoot Kodachrome and get to shoot some of the old stock that is left.
     
  13. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    15,188
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It's not old stock.

    Kodak still makes a wide variety of film. There are new films (Ektar 100), recently improved films (TMY-2), films that reflect continuing evolutionary improvements (the Portra series) and films that have been at least "tweaked" in recent years (Tri-X 400).

    And they still sell a lot of film, although certainly not as much as in the past.

    In case you haven't already gone there, here is a link to that part of Kodak's site that deals with their "Professional" films:

    http://wwwcaen.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/films/filmsIndex.jhtml?pq-path=13319

    Matt
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. RGS122

    RGS122 Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2009
    Location:
    Fresno, CA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Ya I've been there, but I guess I should have been more specific, when I mean old stock, I mean the E-6 slide films they've discontinued. Such as Ektachrome in 100, 100 plus, 160T, 320T, and 400X. As for black and white, HIE and Technical Pan.
     
  16. photomem

    photomem Member

    Messages:
    625
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I have about 800 shts of a 1000 sheet supply of Kodak Polycontrast IV RC. I wish Kodak still made this paper. I think that I might start looking for old stock to freeze, I love it.
     
  17. B&Wpositive

    B&Wpositive Member

    Messages:
    402
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2007
    Shooter:
    35mm
    It began in the late 1990s. The loss of selections started to happen big-time in the early to mid 2000s. I think Verichrome Pan was one of the first classic, highly-sought after films to go after many years of stabilized availability, around 2002.
     
  18. RGS122

    RGS122 Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2009
    Location:
    Fresno, CA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Thanks for the information.
     
  19. PhotoBob

    PhotoBob Subscriber

    Messages:
    535
    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2006
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    One Kodak paper I miss is the Elite Fine-Art.
     
  20. Tom Kershaw

    Tom Kershaw Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,947
    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2004
    Location:
    South Norfol
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Wasn't Kodak Elite a graded cool tone paper?

    Tom
     
  21. Donmck

    Donmck Member

    Messages:
    105
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2009
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 2, 2010
  22. B&Wpositive

    B&Wpositive Member

    Messages:
    402
    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2007
    Shooter:
    35mm
    When I first got into photography in 1997, only the news agencies and papers with the biggest budgets were using digital. There were a huge number of films available. Kodak, Fujifilm, Agfa, Konica, and Scotch all made color film for the US market.

    Fuji's product lineup honestly was not that much different than theirs today. They had a few more specialist products, such as duplicating film and interneg film, as well as a 1600 speed Provia, but other than these, it was very similar to today.

    Kodak, on the other hand, sells a fraction of the types of color film they did 13 years ago.

    This was Kodak's color film lineup around the middle of 1997:

    Ektachrome slide film:

    Ektachrome Elite II 50
    Ektachrome Elite II 100
    Ektachrome 160T
    Ektachrome Elite II 200
    Ektachrome Elite II 400

    Pro Ektachrome slide film:

    Ektachrome 64
    Ektachrome 64T
    Ektachrome 100
    Ektachrome 100 Plus
    Ektachrome Lumiere 100
    Ektachrome E100s
    Ektachrome E100sw
    Ektachrome 160T
    Ektachrome 200
    EKtachrome 320T
    Ektachrome 400x
    Ektachrome P1600
    Ektachrome Infrared

    Kodachrome slide film:

    Kodachrome 25
    Kodachrome 64
    Kodachrome 200

    Pro Kodachrome slide film:

    Kodachrome 25 Professional
    Kodachrome 64 Professional
    Kodachrome 200 Professional

    Color negative film:

    Ektar 25
    Royal Gold 25
    Pro 100
    Ektapress 100
    Pro 100T
    Royal Gold 100
    Gold 100
    Vericolor 160
    Ektacolor 160
    Royal Gold 200
    Gold 200
    Pro 400 PMC
    Pro 400 PPF
    Royal Gold 400
    Gold 400
    Ektapress 640
    Max 800
    Royal Gold 1000
    Pro 1000 PMZ
    Ektapress 1600


    There were other more obscure color films not mentioned also, such as VR 200, VR400, etc, etc...

    And some films, such as Gold 1600, Lumiere 50, Ektachrome 64x, Kodachrome 40, etc. had existed during the earlier 1990s, but had been discontinued prior to 1997. I was very young at the time and didn't get to use many of the films listed in this post.

    B&W was very similar to today, except that Technical Pan, Verichrome Pan, HIE, and and an orthochromatic film existed. (And TMY was on its first version). Even in 1997, your choices were basically Plus-X, Tri-X, 3 speeds of T-Max, or a chromogenic ISO 400 film.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 2, 2010
  23. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,090
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, N
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    You may want to include Fuji, Agfa and Ilford products. You may also want to include replacements.

    PE
     
  24. mopar_guy

    mopar_guy Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,177
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2009
    Location:
    Washington,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    When were Tri-X filmpacks discontinued? I have a Kodak Black and White Darkroom Dataguide from about 1990 and these are still listed as available. I was just wondering if anyone remembered.:confused:
     
  25. RGS122

    RGS122 Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2009
    Location:
    Fresno, CA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Wow Thanks B&WPositive for the list of Kodak films from 97. I wish I had the chance to use Ektachrome 320T, Ektachrome 400x, Ektachrome P1600, Ektachrome Infrared, and Ektachrome Elite II 50. What exactly was Ektachrome Lumiere 100?
     
  26. Ray Rogers

    Ray Rogers Member

    Messages:
    1,555
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2005
    Location:
    Earth
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Tweaked?