When should distilled water not be used?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by david b, Feb 10, 2008.

  1. david b

    david b Member

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    Is there any part of the film developing process where I should not use
    distilled water?
     
  2. walter23

    walter23 Member

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    All parts? It's not necessary. Even during the rinse if you use wetting agent, and blot the final drop from the corner of the film, you won't get any spots.
     
  3. Soeren

    Soeren Member

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    For some developers e.g. Finol it's advised to use distilled waters when mixing up the developer. I use distilled water in my final rinse and for the wetting agent, but, as Walter says, if being carefull its not really necessary. On the other hand it wont ruin anything in any part of the process apart from draining your wallet.
    Kind regards
     
  4. JBrunner

    JBrunner Moderator Staff Member Moderator

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    If your water quality is good, you might only need to use it for mixing chems.
    I have found that here I can use filtered water for mixing everything, and that my normal tap water is fine for washing.

    If there is a place where I wouldn't use distilled water, it would probably be when I mix water with scotch, but I only do that under duress anyway...
     
  5. Fotohuis

    Fotohuis Member

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    It's just a matter of your tap water quality: The amount of carbonates and metal ions can vary in a wide way.
    The precaution of FINOL is just an extra given by the manufacturer (Moersch) to be on the safe side. Especially with developers on high dilution (1+100) it can be sometimes a problem.

    Above developer is gorgeous with the going to be introduced Rollei SUPER PAN 200 film at the Photokina in 2008 (Köln).
    http://www.fotohuisrovo.nl/documentatie/Superpan.pdf
     
  6. Cor

    Cor Member

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    ..you should not use distilled water for washing after fixing because it contains no salts etc. which are normally present in drinking water and which speed up the washing (removal of fixer(by)products....)


    Best,

    Cor
     
  7. Alan9940

    Alan9940 Member

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    I like to use distilled water for my pre-rinse, developer, and final soak with PhotoFlo added. Don't know if it's necessary, but the tap water in my area ain't the best.
     
  8. DannL

    DannL Member

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    I do not not use distilled water in my rinsing of negatives, and I do not not use distilled water w/photo-flo as a final dip for negatives. As far a mixing distilled water with chemistry, that's another "not not" that I do not not do. Bad habits are not not hard to break, and I suppose that's why I do not not do what I do. Oooops! I think I just confused myself. It's going to be a long week. :D
     
  9. nsurit

    nsurit Subscriber

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    I will soon be using filtered "cloud juice" in my darkroom from a rainwater collection system. Anyone else doing so or having done so in the past. The house is in a not heavily polluted area. Bill Barber
     
  10. Paul Verizzo

    Paul Verizzo Member

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    Why?

    Once upon a time distilled water was expensive. It took a lot of energy to distill it. Now, AFAIK, it's just reverse osmosis, done super well. Same as drinking water, but they leave a few salts in so that it isn't flat to the taste buds.

    At $1.50 a gallon, why collect it? It will have dirt and pollen and other nasties in it, too. I didn't realize that Houson wasn't heavily polluted.........
     
  11. david b

    david b Member

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    A gallon of super market distilled water is 89 cents.
     
  12. david b

    david b Member

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    You can read HERE about why I was asking about the water.
     
  13. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council Council

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    I second that. AFAIK it's from the bicarbonate present in tap water that is responsible for its enhanced wash capacities (from stuff quoted in Haist, and also mentioned here: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/38149-salt-water-wash-film-2.html#post452905).