when the black paint from the black camaras bodies

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by peters8, Jan 17, 2013.

  1. peters8

    peters8 Member

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    Hi guys!

    Do you know if there are some professional products or one effective way in order to cover / paint the scratches or the nake metal points in the old black bodies of the cameras.
    My "new" Nikon F3 body has many scratches and many parts without paint...:sad:
    how can I cover these cosmetic imperfections!!!...I don't like it at all.
    If i use a normal black pen (like the pen to write on the plastic of the cd)...it's very ugle because the two blacks aren't similar...and with the time the balck of the pen disappears...lefting the scratches and metal of the body visible.please help me!
     
  2. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Any paint that would be durable enough for constant use would probably have to be baked on. Really not practical. Professional photographers look upon such wear as a badge of honor. Cameras are for taking pictures not to look pretty.
     
  3. agnosticnikon

    agnosticnikon Member

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    My wife has an old black Nikkormat Ftn that looks like it was dragged behind a truck down a gravel road. It's all dented and about 30% of the black is missing. She won't let me or anyone else touch it. She says it shows its history and has character. She also thinks it makes her look more professional, not that she is, because the camera looks very used. So you could go that route.
    Or, you could try to find some Kodak black brushing lacquer, although I'm not sure they make it anymore. Or, get a can of satin or flat black spray paint, and spray a little in the cap. Then using a small brush do your touch up. Have some mineral spirits on hand for quick clean up, as the stuff dries fast. Follow up the paint with a little car wax to even out the lack of gloss if needed. I gave up on my F3s looks a long time ago, as the touch up wears off fairly quick. Good luck, and just have fun with the camera and your photography.
     
  4. henry finley

    henry finley Member

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    This is an area I have had some home-grown experience with. Firstly, I have always speculated that these black cameras were done with powder-coating, like a refrigerator. I've always also thought that the finish on these cameras was thin and quite sorry. The gold corners and edges happen on the first day out of the box. Partly because of the etched logos and wordings. Were the black finish too thick, it would fill in the wordings and the white paint in these wordings would have too little detail to follow.
    A VERY nice job can be done with plain black rustoleum pain with hardener added. I got my hardener from Tractor Supply. Use the rustoleum, cut with an8 0% Coleman camp fuel and 20% ordinary paint thinner. Use in an airbrush. No mention of pre-prep is discussed, as a matter of common sense. The only one thing I have to say on that is to be sure that ALL the old white paint and black underneath it is removed from the wording and logos. You want only bare metal here, with the thinnest coat of rattle-can primer filling them.
    Apply a couple thin coats of the black paint, then a couple more next day. Watch the way the wet paint fills in the etched wordings. It's hard to tell when the paint is wet, but don't let it scare you too much. When it dries, the fill-in is not so bad. The point is that you need to leave enough detail for the white paint you're going to fill these engravings in at the next step will have enough depth and fine detail to adhere to and look correct.
    After the black paint process, let it harden good for a couple weeks. Then go at it with the white paint. I suggest an acrylic base. Acrylic is not supposed to go on top of enamel. But in this case, you have few choices.
    Personally, I use white enamel, and trust my 600-grit sanding and touch-up procedure afterwards. Followed by the usual 2 grades of compounding, as with an automobile.
    When done, it will be GORGEOUS, and a wee-bit tougher than the factory paint job.
     
  5. Chris Nielsen

    Chris Nielsen Member

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    You know, it's funny because a camera was announced this week that has a brass top plate specifically to develop brassing! This is very much a feature of this camera.
     
  6. henry finley

    henry finley Member

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    Friend, I've owned a pile of cameras in my day. I remember a Nkon F2Sb with MD2 mirror drive and a 55 Micro AL. Gorgeous. I got rid of it after a year of shooting fraternity parties. No 35mm ever got better than that.
    I long tired of fancy cameras beyond my income bracket. So this bashed-in Nikkormat FT2 I built out of EBAY parts junk--it's as good as any 35 needs to be. I figure the cost at 5 dollars, 2005 money.
     
  7. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Henry, you used some brand names, people in other parts of the world don't know.
     
  8. PentaxBronica

    PentaxBronica Member

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    I have seen someone do a complete repaint of a black Spotmatic before now. He wanted a black one but all the examples he found were really rough and overpriced for their condition, so he picked up a scuffed but undented chrome one as a donor.

    The other important thing (aside from getting the old finish off - he had the panels blasted with very fine grit after removing them from the camera) is to use an etch primer on brass. If you don't then the paint will probably fall off later on. Use normal automotive spray paints for the black and the lacquer - you can usually buy satin or matte finish lacquer. If it can handle being outside in all weathers for decades then it'll cope with being on a camera.

    I find normal model acrylic paints and a fine brush are the best bet for redoing the markings afterwards. Try giving the panels a thin coat of lacquer first to seal the black paint, that way you can wash the acrylic off if it goes completely pear shaped (and use a fingernail to scrape any small excess off). Add another coat of lacquer after to seal it all in and then reassemble the camera.

    I don't worry too much about brassing but I will touch up the markings. Just because I don't like it when they're half worn off. Same goes for the Pentax M series lens caps with the raised lettering - the silver paint wears off and I generally redo it in the same way. Needs a steady hand but as I'm using acrylics I can just give it a scrub in warm soapy water if it goes wrong.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 18, 2013
  9. ToddB

    ToddB Subscriber

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    Camera Patina..

    My Rollei 3.5F has patina. True.. cosmedically it's not perfect, but once I get back Fleenor it will operate to near perfection. I think Patina on cameras look pretty cool.

    ToddB
     
  10. Ikon

    Ikon Member

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    In Europe: www.micro-tools.de ; "sub-category Farbe/Lacke/Farbstifte".
    Outside Europe: www.micro-tools.com ; sub-category "Paint".

    Glossy paint, matte paint, paint to repair engraved numbers on lenses: it's all there.
     
  11. sangetsu

    sangetsu Member

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    I like brassy cameras,
    P1120158_zps5578a9c2.jpg
    7c4314a1ed0ed9f912ca4712ec4faa49.jpg
    P1120546.jpg
     
  12. williamkazak

    williamkazak Member

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    I had my camera repair guy take off the top and bottom plates of a Pentax Spotmatic for me. I took them and the associated small parts to a plating shop where I had them "black chromed". Then, the camera shop guy re-assembled them for me. You heard the story that you have one body for color and the other for B&W? Right.
     
  13. kivis

    kivis Subscriber

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    Give it up and send it to me.:whistling:
     
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  15. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Non chip black nail varish is excellent for chips. I'm using black Japlac from Internatyional paints for larger areas.

    Ian
     
  16. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    ian,
    i don't know about your local retailers, but in germany, i was able to buy ultra-flat black paint from a few manufacturers, and they worked well for what you're trying to do. i 'fixed my bargain nikon FMs with them.
     
  17. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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  18. peters8

    peters8 Member

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    Thank you very much,Ikon!
    I think that it's the product I was searching for...!!!
    Did you use it sometimes?...Do these products work fine?
    Thank you very much.
    Ciao:wink:
     
  19. peters8

    peters8 Member

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    I've a last question:which of those products you would use to cover the scratches of a Canon F1 new body?
    Thank you for your patience?
    regards
     
  20. Ikon

    Ikon Member

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    I use glossy and matt black camera paint (CF3-F and CF6-F), and they both work very well. First I tried them on some piece of aluminium to check the effect. For engraved numbers, I use white fill-in paint. This one needed some trial and error before I was happy with the result: you need to rub in the paint and wipe off the excess, which to me turned out to be not as easy as it seems. But after some practice it works well too.
    Good luck!
     
  21. Ikon

    Ikon Member

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    I guess that depends on the finishing of the body. I used the paint mostly for some Leica R-lenses, where matte paint turned out to give the best results. But the best thing is to try the paint on a small piece of metal.
    Since the texture of both matte and glossy paints is the same, I believe it must be possible to mix them in order to get precisely what you need. But since it was not needed, I didn't try this myself.
    Regards
     
  22. peters8

    peters8 Member

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    Canon F1 new body is very very matt,the black seems almost a (dark) gray.
     
  23. Jim Rice

    Jim Rice Member

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    If only my Contax RTS had more brassing. Fortunately, there are a couple of dents on the prism. :tongue:
     
  24. Kiron Kid

    Kiron Kid Member

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    Leave it alone. Let it age gracefully.
     
  25. Nikon Collector

    Nikon Collector Member

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    EGO

    LOL I remember getting a new F3 and rubbing it with wet sand to avoid the "rookie" ribbing I would get from the other photographers
     
  26. railwayman3

    railwayman3 Member

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    I agree. I hate scratches on my cameras, particularly if it's through my carelessness, but normal brassing on the edges is no prob. I have a set of binoculars used in WW2 by a now-deceased relative, which carry all the marks of action, and could no doubt tell a lot of exciting tales!