which 400 film for architecture ?

Discussion in 'Darkroom Equipment' started by ekkybedmond, Mar 22, 2010.

  1. ekkybedmond

    ekkybedmond Member

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    Hi,
    any thoughts on which 400 film for architecture. I gather a sharp one, like Delta 400 ?

    Commend are welcome.
     
  2. gurkenprinz

    gurkenprinz Member

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    Do you know the joke that when you ask 2 lawyers you will get 3 opinions?
     
  3. ekkybedmond

    ekkybedmond Member

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    I should, as I am one....

    anyway: the more the better
     
  4. MikeSeb

    MikeSeb Member

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    400TMY processed in dilute Xtol will give great tones, good sharpness, and fine grain.

    Someone will now surely chime in to tell you why I am completely full of sh*t, and offer his/her own recipe.
     
  5. jmooney

    jmooney Member

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    Probably Delta or Tmax.
     
  6. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    Well, I won't be the one who says that Mike's full of it. If you really need a 400 speed B&W film, you can't really do much better than TMY-2. Don't get me wrong, Delta 400 is pretty darned good too, but I just like TMY-2 better. Could it be because I'm more familiar with the way it works? You bet, but that's not the only reason. I like it because it has the ability to capture detail over a very wide brightness range and has a grain structure as good or better than some films that are two stops slower. Obviously, TMX will have even finer grain and even more resolving power; but the point is mostly moot. Grain only begins to show up with really huge magnification when viewed at normal distances. The film's resolving power is usually greater than what the lens is able to deliver.
     
  7. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

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    Stock answer: It depends on what you want your architectural pix to look like. There is usually no one film that is best for any one application. There are, however, films that are better or worse at meeting named criteria.

    My personal answer: For most daytime b/w architecture pix that I would do for my own work, I would probably use Rollei IR400, if the budget allowed. I would even use this film over any slower film, in most situations. It is sharp and contrasty, and due to its extended spectral sensitivity, can be highly tweaked with filters.

    So, what are the criteria for your pix to be a success in your eyes, what format are you using, and how large will your prints be? Black and white or color? (I assume b/w, since you mentioned a b/w film.)

    Off the top of my head, there are:

    b/w:

    Kodak Tri-X 400
    Kodak Tri-X 320 (discontinued, but still available in retail locations and through various Internet sources)
    Kodak T-Max 400
    Kodak BW400CN
    Ilford HP5
    Ilford Delta 400
    Ilford XP2 Super
    Fuji Neopan 400
    Fomapan 400
    Rollei IR 400

    color negative:

    Kodak Portra 400NC and 400VC
    Kodak 400UC
    Kodak Gold 400
    Fuji Pro 400H
    Fuji Superia 400

    color transparency:

    Fuji Provia 400X
    Fuji Sensia 400
    Kodak Elite chrome 400
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 23, 2010
  8. jamesgignac

    jamesgignac Member

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    I'll put in another vote for TMY - I've shot quite a bit of architectural work with it and have always been pleased. That being said I now typically lean toward a slower speed of film. TMY is nice to use though, I agree and I find the 'edge sharpness' (or however you might say it) to really lend itself to sky-scraper lines. I've always developed it in Rodinal so I don't have much input on what the best developer would be...except to say that I've been happy with 400 TMY & Rodinal at 1:50.

    Best of luck!
     
  9. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

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    TMY 2 is a nice film which I use for 35mm and larger.

    I develope in D76 1:1 for 10 min and it prints on #2 paper with a condenser enlarger. Add 10% for a diffusion enlarger and additional 10% for sheet film agitated 10sec/60sec.
     
  10. Colin Corneau

    Colin Corneau Subscriber

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  11. ekkybedmond

    ekkybedmond Member

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    Thanks guys, much appreciated !