Which cheap film to buy at Walgreens to practice shooting?

Discussion in 'Color: Film, Paper, and Chemistry' started by bladerunner6, Jul 21, 2012.

  1. bladerunner6

    bladerunner6 Subscriber

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    I have been away from film for about 8 years and I just got a new camera, an N65.

    I was thinking of getting some cheap film from Walgreens to practice with versus using my more expensive Portra and Ektar.

    All of these are in stock at a Walgreens that is walking distance for me.

    I am also thinking that supporting their film sales now and then might be a good thing.

    http://www.walgreens.com/search/results.jsp?Ntt=film&x=0&y=0

    Any opinions on any of these?

    Thanks.
     
  2. ArtO

    ArtO Member

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    I've used all of the Kodak Gold Ultramax films and like them. The colors are strong and the exposure range is quite forgiving. The 400 is my favorite of that grouping.

    My Walgreens has their own film as well. I've tried a few rolls of it and while I'm not crazy about it my grandkids use it and love it. They shoot a lot of film.
     
  3. Marvin

    Marvin Member

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    I have used and think all of the Kodak films would be fine. I am not sure about the store brand films, but someone on here may know who makes this film and have used it.
     
  4. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    For color negative film, I always buy whats on sale for cheapest price. Most of the time I end up with a four roll package of Fuji 200 and am always satisfied.
     
  5. wogster

    wogster Member

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    Any name brand film should be fine, I try to stay away from store brand films, simply because you never know what it is, now it could be Kodak, next contract it could be Fuji or Lucky or even something made by some guy in India. The most economical is to pick a film, something in a 400ISO would be good, use it, learn what it can and can't do, learn how far you can push it, before it pushes back. Once you know a film really well, your not wasting frames on stuff it can't do. Many times with a film you know well, you can look at a scene and know what the film will record.
     
  6. bvy

    bvy Subscriber

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    I picked up two five-packs of expired Kodak Gold 100 for ten bucks (craigslist). I shot a roll and it looked pretty good. Expired film is great for non-critical shooting.
     
  7. Leighgion

    Leighgion Member

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    As already said, any name brand stock is going to be fine. Kodak and Fuji's consumer lines work great for the money you pay. I've used both and have no complaints.

    Store-branded stuff is less predictable since you don't know what kind of rebrand it'll be, but the number of film manufacturers in the world is quite limited. If you're willing to try out the store brands, you might end up with something you're quite happy with. Fuji is often rebranded, as is Ferrania (Italy).
     
  8. Les Sarile

    Les Sarile Member

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    Kodak Gold 100 at $2.15 per 36 exposure roll is not only cheap but great quality.
     
  9. wblynch

    wblynch Member

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    Target charges less for Kodak film than Walgreen's. Walgreen's brand film is Fuji and very good.
     
  10. brianmquinn

    brianmquinn Member

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    The only problems I have with the multipack is that they are 24 exposure rolls. I find it cheaper to mail order 36 exposure rolls. The real savings is not so much in the purchase price of the film but the developing costs.
     
  11. choppastyle

    choppastyle Member

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    This was some Ritz Camera brand 200 expired in 2005 and shot 6 months ago. The only color shift seems to be the blacks getting bluish.

    6357591375_1fc4e4351f_z.jpg
     
  12. bladerunner6

    bladerunner6 Subscriber

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    That is what I ended up doing.(Getting some film at Target)

    Thanks everyone, great ideas.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 21, 2012
  13. pukalo

    pukalo Member

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    Avoid expired neg film like the plague, if you value the shots you will be taking. Sure, for simply confirming that a new camera actually works, expired is fine. But for casual shooting, where there is a chance you may get a good shot that you like/value, expired film is a big mistake. New, super fresh film is still inexpensive (Kodak at Walgreens, Fuji at Walmart - was just there this afternoon, 7/2014 iso400 Superia, $7.96 for 4 rolls) and will give massively superior IQ. Blacks that remain black (expired gives white and speckled "dandruff" in blacks and shadow areas), smooth and attractive grain (expired leads to large, rough, grain "clumps" forming) and vibrant, clean colors (expired neg often gives color shifted results).
     
  14. wogster

    wogster Member

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    Film prices all depend on where you are, in the United States, your right, here in Canada your lucky to get ONE roll for $8. I still think using expired film is a mistake if the shots are good, with ONE exception. Film I bought fresh 5 years ago, and stuck in the back of the freezer where it has remained is now expired, but should be fine. The price of film is often the smallest part of the process. I whether I pay $1 for a roll of film or $10 may not be a factor. I still need to pay $10 to process it, or use the time and chemicals to process it myself, which can be valued at well over $10.

    The other thing is, can you retake the photos if the expired film is too expired. Photo's of the Maple swamp in the next county, yeah I can take those any time, photo's of the Alaskan Cruise for your 20th anniversary, not so much. Expired film is for photo's you don't really care about, then again so is d*****l:whistling:
     
  15. wblynch

    wblynch Member

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    I care about all my photos, or I don't take them in the first place.

    Expired film is a crap shoot. (pun intended)
     
  16. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    Now that Agfa and are no longer making film most of the old stock is gone: film made in the US is Kodak (Kodacolor), Japan is Fuji (Fujicolor) China is Lucky. The Walgreens' house brand appears to be Fuji color 400. I have seen some house brand disposable cameras made China, but have seen any house brand film made in China in several years. I dont know if Ferrina is still in the Market, last time I looked at their web site seems to indicate that they still make an ISO 200 and 400 but may not imported to the US. I just bought a couple of Fuji 200 multipacks from Wal Mart, but should have bought on line so I can get 36 rather than 24 exp.
     
  17. wblynch

    wblynch Member

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    Ferrania gone :sad:
     
  18. brianmquinn

    brianmquinn Member

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    From: http://www.flickr.com/groups/ishootfilm/discuss/72157630192838072/
    I don't think that machinery was destroyed in 2010 because Ferrania was still producing film in 2011. In 2008, Ferrania signed an agreement with it's employees stating that film production will continues for three years. If you are insterested, I received an email from Ferrania two weeks ago about the statut of the film production. Here is basically the content of the message :

    -Ferrania exited the Imaging business. That include films but also digital camera, camcorder, ink, paper and more.

    -All Solaris films currently on the market (including Made in USA Solaris )are genuine Ferrania films. They are not rebranded Kodak.

    I also spent few minutes to make the fellowing "biography" about Ferrania. My sources are not forums but various newspapers and official statements from Ferrania. Please understand that English is not my first language so mistakes may happen.

    1996-1999
    Imation manifacture a wide range of photographic films. That range include :

    Color Negative : ISO 100, ISO 200, ISO 400
    Color Slide : ISO100, ISO 400, ISO640 Tungsten

    June 22, 1999
    Imation sell it’s Photo Business and Italian Manufacturing plant to SCHRODER VENTURES. Ferrania Imaging Technologies and Ferrania USA inc. are created.

    2000
    Ferrania introduces it’s first range of films
    Solaris FG is available in four speeds and four formats:
    ISO 100 [135]
    ISO 200 [135,110,126,APS]
    ISO 400 [135,APS]
    ISO 800 [135]

    A color reversal film is also introduced : Solaris Chrome 100 [135]

    2003
    The full range or film is improved
    Solaris FG100 -> Solaris FG100 Plus
    Solaris FG200 -> Solaris FG200 Plus
    Solaris FG400 -> Solaris FG400i
    Solaris FG800 -> Solaris FG800i

    2004
    Ferrania Imaging Technologies goes the Italian equivalent of bankruptcy (or something like that. The translation was not clear). With financial help from the Italian government, Ferrania is back as Ferrania Technologies.

    2005
    As of 2005, Solaris FG Plus is available in four speeds and four formats:
    ISO 100 [135]
    ISO 200 [135, 110,126, APS]
    ISO 400 [135]
    ISO 800 [135]

    The reversal film is discontinued.

    2007
    Production of 126 and 110 films stop.

    2008
    Ferrania announce that film production will stop in 2008. However, the same year, the company sign an agreement with it’s employees stating that film production will continues for another three years.

    2009
    Ferrania USA stop producing and distiributing films in America

    2011
    Ferrania stop producing films. Ferrania UK is sold to INFINITT and renamed. Ferrania France goes into liquidation.

    2012
    CS industries close. It was the last distributor of Ferrania products in the U.S.A.

    Just to give you an idea how bad was the shape of Ferrania in the last years, here is a simplified financial report I found about Ferrania France.
    2006 : Profit of 8,000 euros
    2007 : Loss of 116,000 euros
    2008 : Loss of 94,000 euros
    2009 : Loss of 29,000 euros


    Also few interesting facts :

    -Ferrania made films for almost 300 private labels.

    -In 2000, the spokesperson of the Solaris brand was a little girl named "Camilla". The fact that a kid was the spokesperson was supposed to tell consumer "shooting with Solaris is so easy that even a kid can do it."

    -The intended market fo the Solaris range of products was :
    Woman
    25 to 45 years old
    Take care of at least one children
    Use a point and shoot camera

    -There is a real connection between the words "Solaris" and "Solar"
     
  19. David Lyga

    David Lyga Subscriber

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    The VERY best single thing that you can do to achieve great colors is to rate the film at HALF the stated ISO. You will not be disappointed. - David Lyga
     
  20. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

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    Is Mitsubishi still coating film and paper? Wome one told me that Pro Master B&W paper is Mitsubishis and at one time was producing color negative film as well.