Which developer better to use for expired film?

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by dmtry, Apr 29, 2013.

  1. dmtry

    dmtry Member

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    Hello here.

    I have few exposed rolls of expired Delta 100 and HP5+ (2007)
    Which developer and agitation time you can suggest for such film development and why?

    Thanks!
     
  2. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    Assuming the films were not stored in a car trunk (boot) in a hot climate there should be no need to do anything different.
     
  3. agfarapid

    agfarapid Subscriber

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    I can't speak for all films but some time ago I developed baby photos of my daughter who is now 26! The film was (now discontinued) Verichrome Pan and the developer was HC 110 dil b. The results were a lot better than expected. I used the normal development time for that film/developer combination. There was some fog and reduced contrast but the result was an easily scannable negative. Try Ilford's recommendation for HC-110.
     
  4. winger

    winger Subscriber

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    For film that recent (2007 really isn't that old), using your normal development should be fine. I've recently shot some poorly stored Tri-X that expired in '96 and it was fine with my usual developer. For truly old film, HC-110 usually gets the nod.
     
  5. johnielvis

    johnielvis Member

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    hc 110 does work well, but I've found recently by experimenting that a paper developer will produce way less fog than hc-110. I compared hc110 and ilford pq universal and found that hc110 produced fog on paper very quickly, where the pq universal took quite a while before the fog began to develop. So I'm thinking if you have two rolls please continue the experiment. try some hc110 and also try some pq uinversal (which is also a film developer) and compare the two. See if you get less fog with the pqu.

    I also experimented with film. the hc110 did produce more density more quickly than the pq universal. but I couldn't detect fog from either...it was fresh film so the only way to get fog is to let it go a long long time--both of them will get the fog eventually. hc110 likely much faster though.
     
  6. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    i use ansco 130
    it is like dektol but with some glycin in it ..
    130 is a mix your own developer, and i have a feeling
    you won't be able to get glycin in the ukraine
    dektol works well too with fog .. ( from what i hear )
    1:7 7mins, or 1:10 10 mins ..

    i only shoot expired film, some of it 10, 20-30 years old..

    your actual mileage may vary though

    good luck!
    john
     
  7. Richard S. (rich815)

    Richard S. (rich815) Subscriber

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    Fog will not be an issue with film expired in 2007.