Which filter when shooting kodak TP

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by darkosaric, Jun 14, 2012.

  1. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber

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    Hi all,

    I got myself on ebay some kodak TP together with technidol, and I am wondering should I use yellow, orange, or no filter at all. I will be shooting mostly architecture in Italy with 50mm lens. With other films I usually use orange filter - but TP has specific extended red sensitivity, so maybe it is not needed? I did shoot some rolls of TP before, but I forgot did I use filters or not :smile:.

    tnx,
     
  2. Ian C

    Ian C Member

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  3. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    Technical Pan was what was once known as a type C panchromatic film, with enhanced red sensitivity. Kodak used to recommend an X1 (No. 11) yellow-green filter for correct color rendering of daylight scenes using this kind of film. The film data does not list a filter factor for the No. 11 in daylight, but 4 or 5 should be a reasonable starting point for tests. The No. 11 is somewhat hard to find these days, but a K2 (No. 8) yellow filter will give quite reasonable corrections, with reds appearing somewhat light. The filter factor for a No. 8 is 1.5 for this film. Your usual orange filter will also work, but the reds will appear even lighter. You will have to find the filter factor for the orange filter, but a factor of 2 should be a good starting point for experiments. I would bracket exposures with these uncertain filter factors.
     
  4. JPD

    JPD Member

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    No, you don't need a yellow or orange filter with Technical Pan. The extended red sensitivity makes white skin and lips very light and it darkens the blue sky, so you can say that TP has a built-in orange filter. You can shoot architecture without a filter, but for photographing white people it would be good to use a light blue or yellow-green/green filter (and compensate more for the filter factor).
     
  5. darkosaric

    darkosaric Subscriber

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    Thank you all for replays. I have K2 filter, but I think I will use yellow-green; often I get some people inside of architecture photos that I make :smile: