Which filters are for me? A question of size, I think.

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by teleugeot, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. teleugeot

    teleugeot Member

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    Hey there! So, for all intents and purposes my 35mm kit (all Nikon/Nikkor) consists entirely of 52mm filter thread. Now, I also shoot LF with a variety of old lenses that have thread bigger than 52 (but probably not anywhere near 77mm).

    I want to get the biggest filters I would plausibly use and use a step-up ring on my Nikons, but because filter size = money, I want to know what size I should get... Plus, a 52mm lens with a 77mm filter/hood would be somewhat clumsy, I think.

    58? 67? 77? Go ahead and buy 52s??

    What sizes do y'all use?
     
  2. djhopscotch

    djhopscotch Member

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    I use 52mm set for my nikon mf system, and a cokin system for medium format and large format since those are usually used on a tripod. I have a couple of screw on filters for my GW690 since i use that hand held and the cokin system is a little clumsy hand held.
     
  3. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    I have filters of the appropriate size for each lens. I have a fortune in filters that I rarely use. If I were going to do it again I'd buy fewer filters but still have the "right size" for each lens. If 67mm meets your needs, however, they seem to be easily avaiable on the usedmarket and may be cheaper than some of the others.
     
  4. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I have a set of 77mm one because most of my lenses are on larger side and up to 77mm. I do have 52mm but I do not use filters with these.

    If you get 77mm kind, I doubt you could actually use hood that comes with 52mm lenses. With my 67mm lens with hood, 77mm filters are very tight fit.

    52mm version of filters are not that expensive. If you say most of all of your lenses are 52mm, I'd just go ahead and get a set. For your LF use, I might consider getting 77mm set and use reducers to give you maximum flexibility in future.
     
  5. Rol_Lei Nut

    Rol_Lei Nut Member

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    That's a completely personal choice...

    It depends entirely on which lenses you have and use.

    I've tried to optimise the filters for my own lenses (a fair number of brands and formats) without much success... :blink:
     
  6. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    Check out the Lee filter system. They are square filters that fit a holder that connects to adapters that will screw into lenses of different sizes. You can have one set of filters and the holder plus several adapters. Personally I have a couple of sets of filters; one for one format and one for the other format lenses as well as the Lee holder and an adapter which I learned about after the fact. I'm sure they are available at B&H and other photographic supply houses.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  7. teleugeot

    teleugeot Member

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    Great answers, y'all, thanks! Does anyone have any knowledge/opinion of those cheap Indian sets on the 'bay? It's around $45 for a 28-piece filter kit for 52mm (and around $120 for 77mm...)
     
  8. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    No first hand knowledge of such filters but....

    We spend lots of money for the best quality lenses and stress over every aspect of the images we create. It makes no sense to me to put something of unknown quality in front of it. If you are talking about B&W contrast filters, you really need a set of 4.

    Yellow, orange, red, and green.

    If you have to save money, you might want to get lower end of Hoya or Tiffen. I have no idea where they are made but they are of a known quality. My approach would be to buy a high quality filter but buy just a few to start. That way, I won't be buying anything that I'd have to upgrade in the future. Personal preference, of course.
     
  9. teleugeot

    teleugeot Member

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    I think you're right, Kamiya. At this point I really only need yellow, UV, ND and a polarizer I think. I'll probably go that route.
     
  10. BrianShaw

    BrianShaw Member

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    Interestingly I've found, despite great pessimism, many of the Indian knock-off products to be surprisingly functional. But I would not spend money trying out their filters without first seeing them. They may be very good, but...
     
  11. AFenvy

    AFenvy Member

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    The main reason I don't use step up rings to standardize my filters to one size is because I value lens hoods. You simply cannot use the proper lens hood when you use a nonstandard size filter. Just something to keep in mind.
     
  12. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    If you want a polarizer, I recommend a Nikon branded one. I have one and it's actually less expensive than many other premium brands. Quality seems to be top notch as well. On top of it, it comes in a nice carrying case. I like mine.
     
  13. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    I do this all the time. My filters are 77mm. Other than 52mm lenses which are way too small, all other sizes (that I have) actually fits the filter and the ring inside the hood. It's not an easiest thing to install nor adjust (polarizers) but the fact is, in many cases, you actually can....

    All of my lenses have a hood bayonet on the leading edge of the lens barrel.
     
  14. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    All filters degrade the image to a certain extent. A filter adds two additional surfaces into the light path. This is one aspect of photography where it pays to buy the very best. Ansel Adams recommends using filters conservatively. Over the years I have bought many filters only to find that I seldom use them. The one that is used most (and this is only ocassionally) is a medium yellow filter to darken the sky. This filter approximates what the human eye sees when using panchromatic films.