Which format makes sense?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Equipment' started by Doc W, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. Doc W

    Doc W Subscriber

    Messages:
    514
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2009
    Location:
    Ottawa, Cana
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    A friend wants me to do a colour photo of a 'babbling brook" that will be enlarged to 2' x 6' for a poster for her shop window. I can shoot from 6x7 to 8x10 (including 5x7 although I can't seem to find any 5x7 colour film).

    Which format would you use for such an application? Negative or reversal? Will 4x5 or even 6x7 do the job and is 8x10 overkill (it certainly is more expensive to scan)?
     
  2. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

    Messages:
    3,925
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I used 6x7 to make some 2'x3' displays for a booth at a machine design show, the minimum viewing distance was about 6' and they looked very good.

    I'd use 4x5 for your project if it will be viewed from any normal distance.
    Sadly, most don't know what a sharp print is and the quality goes unrecognised. If I was hanging a 2'x6' with my name on it I would use 8x10.
     
  3. dpurdy

    dpurdy Member

    Messages:
    2,230
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Location:
    Portland OR
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    I think I might get 8x10 color film (if 5x7 isn't available) and cut it down to 5x7 size. The 2x6 shape is going to waste a lot of the 8x10 format anyway. At least 5x7 is more the right shape though still not perfect. 6x7cm would be good enough from a little viewing distance but probably wouldn't hold up for close viewing.
     
  4. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

    Messages:
    3,925
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Use an 8x10 with divider boards, you'll waste less film and get two shots. Now that I think of it, that's possibly what I'd do. 1:3 is a hard aspect ratio.
     
  5. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

    Messages:
    18,040
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2004
    Location:
    West Midland
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Why not shoot 10"x4" with a 10x8 camera, it's quite easy to do with a modified sheath for a DDS (double dark slide), OK it's more likely to be slightly narrower in practice but that fits the 6x2 format better anyway.

    Ian
     
  6. cliveh

    cliveh Subscriber

    Messages:
    4,717
    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm RF
    8" X 10" perhaps.
     
  7. Doc W

    Doc W Subscriber

    Messages:
    514
    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2009
    Location:
    Ottawa, Cana
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    I like the idea of two 4x10's but I have no idea where to get the proper equipment ("divider boards"? "DDS"?)
     
  8. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Member

    Messages:
    1,205
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Location:
    Indiana
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I hope you are being paid well, or love this friend a lot, or are independently wealthy.
    Color LF isn't cheap or for the faint of heart.

    In the end if it's going to be scanned and screen printed... well you can see where I am going...... d s l r and rent a TS lens for the price of film and processing.
     
  9. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

    Messages:
    3,925
    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2011
    Location:
    Adirondacks
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Divider boards go in the back of the camera, they allow you to make two 8x5 or 4x10 exposures, or four 4x5 exposures on one sheet of 8x10 film. I have a set for my Deardorff V8. "DDS" in this case means "double dark slide" - what we call a "filmholder". You can modify the darkslide by cutting it in half, so it masks half the sheet, but you'll need an expendable darkslide.
     
  10. Wolfeye

    Wolfeye Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,149
    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2007
    Location:
    Iowa
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Or that you just love the challenge of using film to make this poster. Sometimes, the challenge is enough.
     
  11. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

    Messages:
    2,057
    Joined:
    May 6, 2013
    Location:
    US
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    My first thought is that none of it is going to be much good after spending any time in a shop window. Silver print, inkjet, offset ink--any of it is going to fade in no time in a shop window. May as well just shoot the 6x7 to keep cost down and spend that money having made, or making several prints so she can take one down and replace it after it fades.
     
  12. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,473
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I'd not waste time and money trying to conserve film by shooting 4x10. Use the whole 8x10 sheet and crop when printing. Just make sure you use the appropriate lens and aperture for your crop size.
     
  13. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Member

    Messages:
    1,205
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Location:
    Indiana
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    +1
    do what you know.
     
  14. thuggins

    thuggins Member

    Messages:
    431
    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2008
    Shooter:
    35mm
    I've seen 35mm enlarged to 4'x6' with very good results. It has a lot more to do with the quality of the lens, the printing process and the skill of the photographer than the size of the original.
     
  15. thegman

    thegman Member

    Messages:
    623
    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2010
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    If you have an 8x10, and know how to use it, then you may as well go for it. If money is an issue, then go down to a format which suits your budget. I've never gone higher than 4x5, but if I got a job like you're to do, that's what I'd use. 6x7 is likely more than capable, but may as well have resolution to spare.
     
  16. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    19,996
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2003
    Location:
    local
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    i'd use a small format and a good lens, and a lab you trust ...
    i made some huge display transparencies years ago for a hotel that were displayed at
    an airport ... used 35mm ( and it came out great ! )
    as stated before, viewing distance is everything in a case like this ...
     
  17. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

    Messages:
    16,829
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC, Canada
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    As others have indicated, use the format that you get the best results from.

    2' x 6' is well within the capability of 6x7. If you have the right lens for 4x5, that could be more than enough. If you have a 6x17 back for your 4x5, shoot roll film using that.

    I tend to prefer negative film to transparency film unless I intend to project the results (or print Ilfochrome). A babbling brook may offer some extreme brightness ranges, so negative film might be best for that.

    I don't have the format choices available to you. With my 6x7 equipment I would shoot two rolls - one Ektar 100, the other Portra 160 - and I would use the results that give me the colour saturation I liked best.