Which Hasselblad?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Peter De Smidt, Aug 29, 2007.

  1. Peter De Smidt

    Peter De Smidt Member

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    I'd like, eventually, to get a Hasselblad for head and shoulder portraits, both in a studio environment and on location. I'll probably get a 150mm lens, as I already have a Rollei TLR with a 75mm lens, a Fuji GSW690III, and a Fuji GS670III. I'm looking for opinions as to which model body and lens I should look for.
     
  2. david b

    david b Member

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    what is your budget?

    Got $1000? Get a 500cm and a 150mm CF

    Got $2000? Get a 501cm and a 150mm CFi.
     
  3. DrPablo

    DrPablo Member

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    For $1000 you could get a 500cm with the 150 CT* and 80/2.8 CT*

    I've never used the CF, but I can't say enough good things about the CT* version. It's a truly gorgeous lens.
     
  4. Struan Gray

    Struan Gray Member

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    When I dropped my beloved Kowa on a rock last summer found a 3-lens 2000-series kit going for a good price and snapped that up instead of trying to find a reliable new Kowa body. The 150 f2.8 F is just gorgeous wide open (as is the 250 f4 if you like more compression). Stopped down it is still excellent, but busy backgrounds can fragment badly because of the pentagonal aperture - but that's going to be a problem with any Hasselblad lens.

    The F-lenses seem stupidly cheap (except the 110 f2) at present, and 2000 bodies likewise. If you can live with the 1/90 flash sync it's a great way to get a full kit on a budget.
     
  5. timeUnit

    timeUnit Member

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    For head and shoulders portraits you might need an extension ring as well. Around 8 mm should suffice.

    You can see two portraits in my APUG gallery shot with the 150 sonnar CT*. Both with 8 mm ext. ring.
     
  6. climbabout

    climbabout Member

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    hassy lens

    I photographed countless portraits and weddings in the 70's and 80's with the 150mm cf - it's a beautiful lens.
    Tim
     
  7. Peter De Smidt

    Peter De Smidt Member

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    What's better about the 150mm CFi?
     
  8. kb244

    kb244 Member

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    Well its got 'i' the lowecase i always makes things better... iPod, iDog, iMac...
     
  9. Andrew Moxom

    Andrew Moxom Member

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    The CFI has the latest lens and coating design (according to zeiss), longer shutter life, and better wearing materials for the lens mount.
     
  10. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    And an electronic interface that you do not need if you shoot film.

    Steve
     
  11. Alan9940

    Alan9940 Member

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    Hello Peter,

    Nothing wrong with the good 'ole 500C/M. If you want/need the gliding mirror to avoid vignetting of the focussing screen when using longer lenses, like the 250CF, then you'll have to move to a more recent version of the 5xx series. I've always preferred this series due to its all mechanical nature...I used to shoot quite a bit in VERY cold weather.

    The "i" version is supposed to be "improved." Years ago I did a rather informal test between my 150CF and a friends 150CFi (bare branches against winter sky type of thing) and I couldn't see any difference in the final print at the sizes I typically printed to.

    Good luck with whatever decision you make.
     
  12. gr82bart

    gr82bart Subscriber

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    And the CFE, which is really the latest in the line up.

    Regards, Art.
     
  13. Peter De Smidt

    Peter De Smidt Member

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    Thanks Alan. What one's would you look at? It's possible that I'd eventually get a longer lens.
     
  14. david b

    david b Member

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    The CFi is the latest model which means, theoretically, that Zeiss and Hasselblad will have their parts for much longer than the CF models.
     
  15. TheFlyingCamera

    TheFlyingCamera Membership Council Council

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    The more recent 503 CW has the Gliding Mirror System that allows you to view the longer lenses without vignetting. I'm not sure if the 503CX also has it, but I think not. This is also on the 201,203 and 205 cameras (the 205 is just beyond bloody ridiculous in price even used, but a damn nice camera. It's also one of the reasons to get the CFi or CFe lenses. The 200 series cameras have an electronic interface that lets the meter interact with the lens for some degree of auto-exposure).
     
  16. Rob Skeoch

    Rob Skeoch Advertiser Advertiser

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    I have a 553... they seem to sell cheaply on the bay and I've always enjoyed the motor drive. When blad was the camera to use for NBA I had four of them but when things switched to digi I sold them off and kept the one in the best shape.
    They were so much money new.... but things have changed.

    As far as lenses go I like the 120mm macro better than the 150. I've also wanted a 180 for years but just never bought one.

    -Rob Skeoch
    www.bigcameraworkshops.com
     
  17. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    I have a 503 CX that I use with 50mm, 80mm, 150mm and 250mm lenses without a problem. Yes, it vignettes on the telephoto, but that is not really a problem.

    Steve
     
  18. skahde

    skahde Member

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    Gliding Mirror System was first incorprated in the Hasselblad 2000FC and incorporated in all cameras using a focal plane shutter which followed. All motorized cameras from the 500ELX upwards also have GSM. The other two cameras are the 501CM and the 503CW.

    Do I need GSM? If a 150mm is your longest lens and you don't do macro simply forget about it. If a 250mm or longer is your favorite glass or you use the bellows or lots of extension quite often, you might prefer to see all of the projected image in the finder on a regular basis.

    best

    Stefan
     
  19. Alan9940

    Alan9940 Member

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    Hello Peter,

    Looks like others have already jumped in and answered your question. I'm pretty sure it was the 503CW, as FlyingCamera said, that introduced the gliding mirror. I've always been very happy with my old 500C/M so, to be honest, I didn't really keep up with the 5xx series as it matured.

    All that said, though, I would'nt worry too much about the vignetting with a longer lens (like the 250), if you decide on an older model. The 250CF is the longest Zeiss lens that I own and darkening of the corners (more upper than lower) is really not an issue. I certainly wouldn't make a buying decision based on vignetting (or not) alone. I'd think about how I'm going to use the camera...do I need a winder, for example. If so, you're gonna have to go with a later model.

    Good luck with your decision. Whichever model you decide on I'd bet you won't be disappointed.
     
  20. Nokton48

    Nokton48 Subscriber

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    The 500CM is a fine camera, I have two. And two of the 500ELM, the motor model. All work fine for me with my lenses, up to the old 350mm Tele-Tessar. Mirror vignetting is not a major problem IMO.

    These bodies are getting really reasonable. I recently got second 500ELM body, with flip-up finder, two -nice- Varta batteries, an A12 back, and a charger, all for $199, buy-it-now. Not bad, Eh?