Which light meter?

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by gtr fan, Feb 1, 2012.

  1. gtr fan

    gtr fan Member

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    Hi all,

    I have a polaroid 600se I am wanting to purchase a light meter so I don't waste film on under/over exposed newbie shots.

    I am looking at the senika L-308s given the price. Do these things actually tell which aperture setting to use?

    Apeture settings on the 600se and medium - full format camera aren't a direct comparison to say digital SLR's, so would a light meter give me a correct setting for 600se format?

    Or am I just way off the mark in what I am saying?

    Thanks for any help / advice.
     
  2. markbarendt

    markbarendt Subscriber

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    Actually there is no difference in metering for different formats.

    Yes the meter will give you aperture.
     
  3. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    try using the search function.
     
  4. stavrosk

    stavrosk Member

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    Or try googling the light meter in general.
    You need to know what it does and how to work with it before you buy it I think.
     
  5. sangetsu

    sangetsu Member

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    I prefer the Sekonic analog light light meters, they are very easy to use. Simply set the ASA dial to the film speed you are using, point the dome on the meter toward the light that will be illuminating your subject, then press the button. The needle will swing to an EV number (exposure value). Turn the other dial to line up the EV number with the high or normal setting (the meter comes with a slide which is inserted behind the dome in sunlight, when the slide is in, use the high table). Once the numbers are lined up, you can read the possible shutter speed/aperture combinations on the opposite side.