Which of these films would be best for use in daylight foggy conditions?

Discussion in 'Exposure Discussion' started by ted_smith, Dec 27, 2009.

  1. ted_smith

    ted_smith Member

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    Hi

    Popping out tomorrow to hopefully capture some hilly, mountainous landscapes draped in fog and some early morning breaks of light using some B&W films and my Nikon F5.

    I want to try and get some really contrasty, maybe grainy, shots. Just wondering, of the films I have at home (listed below) what film would be best for this outcome in the above climatic conditions:

    Fuji Acros 100
    Fuji Neopan 400CN
    Fuji Neopan 1600 (never used it before)
    Ilford XP2 Super 400 (never used it before)

    I assume the NEopan 1600 is grainy but is it OK to use in daylight?

    Thanks

    Ted
     
  2. Richard Wasserman

    Richard Wasserman Member

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    Neopan1600 is certainly the grainiest of the films you listed and is a very nice film. I would rate it at about 640EI which I think is pretty much it's actual speed when not pushed. Good luck, and be sure to let us know how things turn out.
     
  3. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Of those I'd take Acros, but then I don't like grain in my personal images.

    However grain & fog go well together so the 1600 would be interesting, I wouldn't use the chromogenic films as they will possible give negs to flat to print easily.

    Ian
     
  4. Dave_ON

    Dave_ON Member

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    Ted, I would suggest using the 400 and pushing it a stop. Maybe two, depending just how much grain and contrast you want. Just how far into the sunrise will you be working? You may want to shoot both 1600 and 400 as the conditions at dawn change quickly. Try to use short rolls so you don't get caught with 30 exposures left with the wrong film loaded for the conditions. 1600 is OK in daylight but not in the full sun. You may have to stop down so much you lose sharpness.

    Dave