Which paper and chemicals?

Discussion in 'Contact Printing' started by Joey Anchors, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. Joey Anchors

    Joey Anchors Member

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    I just got an old Albert contact print maker that I would like to use to make contact prints of my 6x7 and 6x9 negatives. Which paper/chemicals should I be look at getting?

    I was thinking of using ilford ilfobrom gallery grade 2 or 3 paper as the prints will be matted and framed for sale.

    P.S. I don't have an enlarger
     
  2. wildbill

    wildbill Member

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    any vc paper with any paper developer
     
  3. pstake

    pstake Member

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    Wouldn't he need contact printing paper? Like AZO, Lodima?

    Not being a wise guy; I've really never contact printed.
     
  4. pdeeh

    pdeeh Member

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    No, no need for "special" paper
     
  5. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    This is true - with a small qualification.

    The old contact paper was quite slow, and some contact printers had correspondingly intense light sources.

    So you might discover that the exposure times needed for enlarging paper are inconveniently short.

    The solution? Replace the bulb with something of lower intensity, or add something else that will lower the light intensity.
     
  6. Joey Anchors

    Joey Anchors Member

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    All good points. Ok I think I'm try the ilfobrom gallery paper.

    Which chemicals should I look into using with this paper?
     
  7. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    If you aren't going to be printing alot(and even if you do)I recommend Ethol LPD paper developer for its keeping properties. You can alter the dilution for different looks. Undiluted for cool tones and more dilute for warmer tones without sacrificing development times. You can use any stop bath and fixer, though I recommend a fast fixer such as Ecopro neutral of Formulary TF-4 for faster wash times.
     
  8. Joey Anchors

    Joey Anchors Member

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    Rick thanks for the info! I will try LPD with the Ilford paper and see how it turns out.
     
  9. MartinP

    MartinP Member

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    Foma still make a "contact-speed" paper, called Fomalux. That might be worth a look. It is a fibre paper with a slow chloride emulsion. I have two packets for a few months and am ashamed that I haven't tried it yet! The idea was to use 8x10" film pinhole negs (Foma 100) on it, but I still haven't figured out how I'm going to hold the DDS on the back of the home-made camera . . .
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 21, 2014
  10. Joey Anchors

    Joey Anchors Member

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    Ok so I am getting supplies to start doing contact prints. Getting 5x7 trays, a couple measuring cups, a thermometer, and want to get jugs for the chemicals in but not sure which size I should get for doing 2x3 prints.
    I am already planing on a one gallon jug for the LPD developer as I will be using it 1:1.

    What at size jugs should I get for the other chemicals?
     
  11. Joey Anchors

    Joey Anchors Member

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    Matt speaking of light sources, you guessed right. This contact printer has two 15watt bulbs under a frosted pane of glass.

    I have done a few (more like 10) runs of contact prints, using LPD (1:1), TF4 (1:3), and Ilford Ilfobrom Gallery FB paper (Grade 2). What I am running into is making exposures of 8-10 second produces nothing but solid black. I found that an exposure of 1 second (literally closing the lid and open it right back up) will give me an image. I tried taking out one of the bulbs but that only gives me 1 more second and an uneven exposure.

    What are some thing I can try to get better contact prints using what I got?


    P.S. The bulbs are 3" below the top pan of clear glass the negative and paper sit on.
     
  12. Gerald C Koch

    Gerald C Koch Member

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    Yes, use the slowest paper you can find. If you replace the bulb in the printer make sure that light coverage remains uniform.
     
  13. RalphLambrecht

    RalphLambrecht Subscriber

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    No,just as already said by someone else;any paper ;any developer should do.:whistling:
     
  14. pstake

    pstake Member

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    Joey,

    enlarging paper is too fast. Use Azo or Lodima paper. I have now contact printed 4x5s on a contact printer with two 15 watt bulbs. My exposures are around 2 seconds with a minute or less in the developer. I'm using AZO G-4.

    I am serious. And you are welcome to send me your surplus of Galerie :smile: About this I am only half joking.
     
  15. Joey Anchors

    Joey Anchors Member

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    Ok it looks like I am doing things right as I am getting the same exposure/developing times as you pstake
     
  16. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    A lamp dimmer might help reduce the light intensity, at the risk of changing the colour of the light itself. Your paper is not sensitive to red light, and using the dimmer will make the light go more red/less blue. I would suggest that you take out one bulb and keep it safe while you experiment with a single bulb and the dimmer.
     
  17. pstake

    pstake Member

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    I've shot fewer than 75 4x5 films in my life with only a handful of what I would call successful negatives.

    I'm complimented by this but it's a BIG assumption to think that if you're doing things like me, you're doing them right.
     
  18. Joey Anchors

    Joey Anchors Member

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    One thing I have noticed when my prints in developing is that if left in the developer for a full two mintures they turn solid black. So I have been taking them out when they look done which is usually around 60 seconds