Which Rolleiflex models have parallax correction

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by mtngael, Nov 24, 2011.

  1. mtngael

    mtngael Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've read that some Rolleiflexes have parallax correction of some sorts but can't find which models have this. Any Rollei experts out there who can help? More curious than anything as I'm not ready to get one yet.
     
  2. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,960
    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2010
    Location:
    Ogden, Utah
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    which rolleiflex compensate for parallax

    almost all of them except the very earliest models made in the 30s. If it has a coated lens (post wwii) it's got compensation. As you focus, a frame under the focusing glass shifts up and down. You can see it do this.

    But all the models built from 1950 on that you see for sale will compensate, even if you use rolleinar close-up lenses.

    this includes rolleiflex and rolleicord models, with interchangeable hoods or not. If it's a rollei, what you see is what you shoot.
     
  3. mtngael

    mtngael Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Great, thanks much.
     
  4. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Subscriber

    Messages:
    766
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Well, there is ALWAYS parallax with a TLR. What you see is always offset an inch or more from what you get on film. For most purposes, this parallax is minor. The closer you get, the more parallax will be a factor. The shifting frame device in Rolleis helps with overall framing.

    A single lens reflex or a view camera ground glass DOES show you what you will get on film without parallax. Mamiya and Minolta made devices that offset the camera this distance between the taking and viewing lens.
     
  5. mtngael

    mtngael Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yeah, I'm used to Parallax, from using RF cameras. I mainly like the idea of correction for a rough framing guide. I tend to compose a bit loose anyway, even in SLRs as I usually print in whole plate (6.5" x 8.5") size. most of what I doesn't require strict near-far juxtaposition. If I need it I, I use my SLRs instead.
     
  6. ic-racer

    ic-racer Member

    Messages:
    7,485
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2007
    Location:
    Midwest USA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Most of them, even the Rolleicords and "T" have it. However, no Yashica had it. No 'baby' had it either.
     
  7. benjiboy

    benjiboy Subscriber

    Messages:
    8,611
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2005
    Location:
    U.K.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    That's right Dan, parallax is only significant at a distance of less than ten times of the focal length of the lens in use, so in the case of a 75 mm lens on a Rollei it would be 750mm.
     
  8. mtngael

    mtngael Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    But at least with a TLR it's only on one axis! I had a funky old 35mm RF that had no parallax correction for the framelines, and an uncoupled RF mechanism. That took a while to get used to...
     
  9. Pumalite

    Pumalite Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,078
    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2009
    Location:
    Here & Now
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Just about all of them
     
  10. mtngael

    mtngael Member

    Messages:
    55
    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2010
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks for the replies. I'm not sure why none of my info searches turned that up.
     
  11. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Subscriber

    Messages:
    766
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Interesting. I could swear that I've noticed it at further distances. I can line something up in the viewfinder, say the top of a pole at four feet and a door opening in the background. In the image, the pole seems tighter to the top of the opening than I remember in the framing. Of course, this is both a small difference, and more precision than I expect from a TLR. It could also simply be my memory playing games- well that shot isn't as nice as I thought, I know! it must be parallax, not my poor composition!! :smile:
     
  12. jon koss

    jon koss Subscriber

    Messages:
    674
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    Shooter:
    35mm
    While not technically a Rolleiflex, my Art Deco 'Cord from the mid-'30's has parallax compensation. :smile: