Why pros (commercial) left large format?

Discussion in 'Ethics and Philosophy' started by shootsingh, May 17, 2011.

  1. shootsingh

    shootsingh Member

    Messages:
    23
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Location:
    LONDON
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I managed to grab all the 8x10 dark slides from a studio photgrapher who sold all his large format gear and switched to digital. While driving back i was wondering why he choosed 8x10 in the first place, when 4x5 could be much efficient and convenient in commercial environment. But How would he compare 8x10 to digital? Jumping from 35 or 120 to digital could make sense for a commercial man but how from 8x10. Would that be just an ego shooting on 8x10 now couldnt front the huge savings involved in digital. Was 8x10 there for quality or just a show off?
     
  2. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

    Messages:
    1,504
    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Location:
    Westminster,
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Comes down to what your client wants.

    There was a time when high end clients wanted 8x10, so we provided.

    Now the new generation of art directors want digital, and don't see the need for 8x10. So it gets dumped. Simple as economics.
     
  3. artonpaper

    artonpaper Subscriber

    Messages:
    326
    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2007
    Location:
    Staten Islan
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Indeed this is true. The quality for product photography was stunning, and the transparencies could be more easily retouched because of their size. I knew a guy who was a transparency retouch artist. He could do amazing things with dye and bleach. He refused to learn Photoshop and last I heard, he's gone off to Sicily to paint.
     
  4. shootsingh

    shootsingh Member

    Messages:
    23
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Location:
    LONDON
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If it was cost then 35 was always an option or 120 as is digital today.
    If it was quality then offcourse 8x10.

    I think it works both ways, not just the client or director but its down to the camera man too. We probably have always used LF or ULF without much requirement.
     
  5. Michael W

    Michael W Member

    Messages:
    1,431
    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2005
    Location:
    Sydney
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I just bought an 8x10 camera from an advertising photographer who now shoots everything with a Nikon D3.
     
  6. shootsingh

    shootsingh Member

    Messages:
    23
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2010
    Location:
    LONDON
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Funny but atleast the 8x10 came to the right hands.
     
  7. M.A.Longmore

    M.A.Longmore Member

    Messages:
    1,887
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2009
    Location:
    New York
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    .
    I bought some equipment from a professional photographer, last year.
    Normally, I would be extremely excited to be buying gear at a great price.
    But, that transaction made me feel very sad ...

    Ron
    .
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2011
  8. Photo Engineer

    Photo Engineer Subscriber

    Messages:
    25,779
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rochester, NY
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    As size goes up, the need for retouching and its difficulty involving dust, dirt and spots goes down. This is a very time consuming and costly process. It is relatively easy with digital using some digital spotting tools. This, I am sure, is a factor as is the increasing expense of LF and ULF camera materials and the increasing difficulty in getting a wide range of products.

    PE
     
  9. vpwphoto

    vpwphoto Member

    Messages:
    1,205
    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2011
    Location:
    Indiana
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I am getting older and a young art director insists that my Sinar is an antique camera. She calls it the "slow camera".
    Is not impressed with the Leaf Aptus back and all that resolution and control.
    Last I heard she was shooting products with the DSLR jockey up the street.
     
  10. Dave Swinnard

    Dave Swinnard Subscriber

    Messages:
    263
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2002
    Location:
    Parksville,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    That pretty much sums it up...clients expect to see images RIGHT NOW. If you don't provide that, somebody else will.
     
  11. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

    Messages:
    4,211
    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2008
    Location:
    Richmond/Geelong, AUS
    Shooter:
    Multi Format

    Yee-haw, sure is! I love the tippity-tippity-tap-tap-beep-beep of my #20 natural spread brush in removing dust specks, film splodges, hairline scratches et al. Apparently this business of "cleaning up" the neg/tranny at the englargement stage drove of my Ilfochrome printers nuts. I insisted on a speck-free print or I wouldn't pay $200 for it. So many a print went back for re-printing (I was not alone).