Wind Stabilizer Kit for ULF cameras...

Discussion in 'Ultra Large Format Cameras and Accessories' started by User Removed, Apr 24, 2006.

  1. User Removed

    User Removed Guest

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    http://www.filmholders.com/wskit.html


    Would anyone suggest this for a Korona 12x20 I just got? Has anyone used it, and it works well?

    Any comments or suggestions would be good.

    Thanks,

    Ryan McIntosh
     
  2. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    Too expensive and from what I have heard a bad execution of a good idea. I think you can have a machinist make you something similiar for half the price and to your specs, is what I plan to do for my Wisner, which BTW is another good idea badly executed......
     
  3. Donsta

    Donsta Member

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    Ryan

    I have a 12x20 Korona - I've heard that Alan's kit is just too painful to operate - very fiddly etc. My own experience is that a monopod under the front rail (mine has a spare tripod hole there) works an absolute treat. I have a lightweight carbon fiber monopod with a quick release head. I leave the quick release on the front rail and simply clip the monopod onto it every time after I've set-up. It's a Bogen pod, so it has the very handy clips - I just let them all out until the bottom makes contact with the ground, close all but one of them up and finally take some weight off the front rail before tightening the last clip. The process takes about 10 seconds and you have no issues with a saggin front assembly too. I have not since had a shot ruined by wind. I took a couple of shots in a blizzard in February (30 mile an hour wind) using this set-up and shielding the camera with my body (I set the oufit up about 1 meter above the ground to help) - no movement on a 2 second exposure. The monopod set-up also allows me to get away with an extremely light tripod - I use a Gitzo 1325 which weighs 4.5 pounds!
     
  4. df cardwell

    df cardwell Subscriber

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    I think Edw Weston used a curtain rod.

    And using two light tripods ( or a tripod and monopod ) is a brilliant alternative to hauling a monster tripod.
     
  5. Brook

    Brook Member

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    I use either a small C stand with a mafer on the end and clamp it to the front of the rail, or if I dont want to haul the C stand too far, just use a C stand type arm with a mafer on one end to the camera and the clamp built into the arm on one leg of the tripod. Works very well even on a very flimsy B&J.
     
  6. Richard Wasserman

    Richard Wasserman Member

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    I made something similar for an 8x20 Korona. I used a 1/4 inch diameter brass rod that passed through 2 fittings that I attached to the front and rear parts of the camera. The fittings had small holes for the rod to slip through, and thumbscrews to tighten it down. I found that it added a lot of stability and the Korona I had needed all the help it could get.

    Richard Wasserman
     
  7. noseoil

    noseoil Member

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    Ryan, I use the monopod idea as well. The B&J has a front rail similar to the Korona, so I just used a 1/4" "Tee" nut and a block of wood. Simple and cheap. tim
     
  8. John Z.

    John Z. Member

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    I had the stabilizer for my 8x10 Canham camera; it worked as far as stabilizing the front and rear standards together, which I do believe can be an issue as far as stability and movement for many large format cameras--and the larger the camera the more an issue it becomes. The problems with the stabilizer were that it was time consuming to set up; one more step in the taking of a photograph; and also the hardware that attaches to the standards, the 'mounts' were usually sticking out and susceptible to being knocked loose or knocked off, and being lost.
    I have actually had good success with a very simple trick I use now for stabilizing my 11x14; I have found some very thick and large rubber bands, and I can easily attach the band around the front and rear tightening knobs in a second--very easy, but definitely more stable overall when needed-particularly for longer focal lengths.
     
  9. Jay Packer

    Jay Packer Member

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    Ryan:

    I had a local machinist make a larger version of the Brubaker wind stabilizer kit for my 12x20 Canham (48 inches of bellows extension). It works okay for shorter lenses (360 – 450mm), but I rarely use it in the field. For longer lenses (750mm and 1000mm Apo-Germinars and 35 inch Artar), I use a monopod under the front standard, and a small wedge-shaped foam pillow under the bellows. In addition to preventing bellows sag, the pillow dampens vibrations that might be transmitted between the front and rear standards through the bellows, and also minimizes bellows movement in the wind. And in the wind, the sail area of the bellows contributes more unwanted camera movement than either the relatively stable front standard or the less secure rear standard. Having said that, I stand in awe of Donsta’s ability to use his 12x20 in a 30 mph wind. Unless I have a sizable boulder to hide behind, my camera is virtually unusable in any winds greater than 12 - 15 mph.
     
  10. michaelwjones

    michaelwjones Member

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    Alan’s stabilizer is hardly a bad execution of a good idea. It’s built to the same quality as anything Steve Grimes (or Adam) ever turn out (as are Alan’s film holders). I used both the stabilizer and his films holders for my Korona 8x20 and the stabilizer did what it was supposed to do. That said, it is a bit fussy and time consuming to use. Since using ULF is incredibly time consuming anyway, the extra moment is not really noticed. It locks the front and read standards together and if you use a loop of “something,” you can support the bellows. It is pricy, but it works just as it says. You can also use any of the suggestions found here. I would not recommend it for every camera, but I would use the stabilizer for older cameras.

    Mike
     
  11. Jorge

    Jorge Inactive

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    That said, it is a bit fussy and time consuming to use. Since using ULF is incredibly time consuming anyway,

    This is what I call a bad execution of a good idea, sorry but it does not take me any longer to use my 12x20 than it does to use my 8x10, so spending 20 minutes fiddling with a gadget seems to me a waste of time. In any case, I have heard far more times it is not worth it, I am just passing along the info I have.
     
  12. David

    David Member

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    I bought a Wind Stabilizer Kit two or three years ago for a Korona 8x20. It does work nicely for those occassions when you have buffetting wind (just be sure to loosen it up before you do any refocussing!!!). It's been some time since I've used it, not due to weather conditions but because of the inconvenience factor. Maybe it's just laziness but I don't think so. My experience says the kit isn't worth the bother except for extreme circumstances.
     
  13. Stu Newberry

    Stu Newberry Member

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    I made a wind stabilizer at a machine shop I had access to at one point early in my life, and it works great. Infinitely flexible in terms of rise, shift, swings, focus length. Cost: materials (two chunks of brass, steel rods of various lengths, and four wood screws) and about an hour on the machine. The camera I made it for (Tachihara 4x5) still folded perfectly with the gizmos mounted. Send a note if you want to see how I made it.

    Tom
     
  14. Dave Wooten

    Dave Wooten Member

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    Blind man shooting

    Ryan,
    By now you know that a ulf with extended bellows becomes a sail....it seems some use the stabilizer to add strength to the camera itself at the larger extensions....for this the extra tripod is good...I saw a set up Kerik had where a small support leg was clamped to the front leg of his tripod and extended to the front standard of his 14 x 17....he uses some very large and heavy lenses...maybe he can shed some light on this...it was a commercially available product if I recall....

    that being said, if one is setting up in a locale and plans to spend some time in the location photographing in the wind...storm shots, waiting for the light, whatever, I prefer to set up a very portable duck blind, available from Pro Bass or Cabelas, a good wind break is best solution....when shooting 4 x 5 ( I know your post was ulf) , my choice for those windy or stormy conditions, I like toyo with the metal reflex hood...a practically wind proof set up..as also is my old graflex.....

    being an apprenticed geezer I never stray far from the truck with the larger cameras so often it works as a good windbreak for starters...