Woops! I forgot to change ASA setting

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by lorirfrommontana, Aug 18, 2009.

  1. lorirfrommontana

    lorirfrommontana Member

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    Okay, I was shooting a roll of Black and White Arista Edu 100 through my youngest's 'new' Sears TLS at the fair this last week. It has awesome lenses! I was having fun. I set the shutter speed at 125 and used sunny 16 for shooting as I didn't get batteries for it yet. I didn't realize where the ASA/ISO setting was on this camera and well, completely forgot about it! When I looked yesterday it was set at 800. Should it matter? Should I just develop it like I normally do? I think I got some nice early morning shots before the people (hopefully). Any advice would be appreciated.
     
  2. dbonamo

    dbonamo Member

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    You were in manual, I assume shutter 125 and ap f16, so ASA setting should not matter.. Process normally.
     
  3. bdial

    bdial Subscriber

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    With no battery in the camera, it won't matter at all. Even with a battery, as dbonamo says, the manually set shutter speed and f/stop would make anything the meter was doing irrelevant.
     
  4. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    That setting is only for the meter, which in your case this time wasn't working anyway. That meter is there only as a guide to exposure on that camera. It has no effect on the aperture and shtter speeds that you set manually. OK, so you may have inadvertently underexposed the film by a little bit, but it's nothing drastic. Process normally and you should have decently printable negatives.
     
  5. lorirfrommontana

    lorirfrommontana Member

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    Okay! I thought i was okay not using the meter. Just had a fright for a minute! Thanks!
     
  6. fschifano

    fschifano Member

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    The reason I wrote that you may have underexposed a bit is because sunny sixteen for an ISO 125 film is sometimes not quite enough. Sunny 16 works fine in my part of the world in the middle of the day from mid spring to mid autumn. Other times of the year, the sun is too low in the sky and the readings are more like sunny f/11, a full stop more exposure. Arista.EDU Ultra is 1/3 stop slower that ISO 125 under the best of circumstances.
     
  7. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    We all have days like this, especially if one is using multiple film backs with different speed film.

    Steve
     
  8. Paul Sorensen

    Paul Sorensen Member

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    I am guessing that sunny in Montana is really sunny. In Colorado at times it was more like sunny 22, so I am guessing that the exposures are at least within a reasonable range.

    You are lucky that you made this mistake when not using the meter, most of us do this at least once, and pretty much always when the meter is being used and we end up with film three stops underexposed. I would not like to see the results from Arista EDU 100 (either the old stuff or the Ultra stuff) shot at 800. :D
     
  9. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    Lori:

    When you use sunny 16 to determine exposure, the biggest reason to set the correct ISO on the camera is that it helps you remember what film you put in there in the first place.

    This can be quite important, if like some here, you have too many cameras :smile:.

    Matt
     
  10. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    That is an oxymoron. One cannot have too many cameras.

    Steve
     
  11. lorirfrommontana

    lorirfrommontana Member

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    No I don't think you can have too many cameras!!! I have boxes of old cameras. Nothing real special but still fun to play with! I am having trouble giving up this camera that I was testing for my daughter. I absolutely love it. It just feels right in my hands. It is heavy but I love using it. I really don't want to trade as I like my FM2 also but I really love the one I got for her. I'm hoping the pictures turn out as good as I think they will be! Lori