Working *with* the contrast of Arista APHS for pt/pd ?

Discussion in 'Alternative Processes' started by nick mulder, Feb 8, 2009.

  1. nick mulder

    nick mulder Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,204
    Joined:
    May 15, 2005
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Hello,

    I have just built an 11x14" back for my Sinar P system and am eager to try it out, I have 10 sheets of Arista APHS litho film here and am keen to shoot some portraiture...

    My plan is to pump 4x 650W open face lamps onto the subject from about 700mm away (a crude ring light of sorts) and shoot at around f11 to get full coverage with the lens I am using at the 1:1 magnification I want...

    (Either that or two 1k profiles from each side to make the most of the output)

    Not sure of the exposure yet, but to keep exposures down I thought that pushing the film may come in handy - development time and concentration being my 'free variables' here - I'd use D19 or maybe Dektol if I can find it around home ...

    As it is a litho film I was hoping that the increased contrast would work in my favor considering I will be printing in Pd...

    Question > Am I simply too far off the scale of acceptable contrast and/or exposure times ? (trying to keep the shutter open for less than 1/30 sec)

    Anyone have experience in working with Litho film contrast as an aid for Pd printing ?


    Nick
     
  2. PVia

    PVia Member

    Messages:
    813
    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Location:
    Pasadena, CA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The only thing I've used the APHS film for is to make enlarged negatives for Pd printing.

    Yes, it can be very contrasty, that's why I develop in dilute Dektol 1:9, which although contrasty, still gives me continuous tone.

    I believe some guys have used it in camera at an ISO of 3-6...you may want to check out Jim Galli's site or email him. He has used this film in camera.

    Don't know if any of this helps, but thought I'd at least offer...let me know what you end up doing!
     
  3. nick mulder

    nick mulder Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,204
    Joined:
    May 15, 2005
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Yes, thanks -I found that was the appropriate ISO from a google search - I thought I'd try rating it 25 ASA or likewise and develop longer/stronger as then I reckon I'm getting into the exposures I need for successful portraiture (under hot lights).

    Just trying to figure if the neg will be too contrasty (even for Pd) or lacking in shadow detail (if my theory is right) considering the push - sure I'll give it a go, but with 10 exposures to play with I dont want to waste them or the time of the sitter (and lugging all that gear around myself, it takes two tripods to hold it all up!) so any experience would be nice to glean info from ...

    I'll PM jim - thanks !
     
  4. nick mulder

    nick mulder Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,204
    Joined:
    May 15, 2005
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Just had a thought - I'll be using tungsten lamps - considering the film is lith, will I be fighting for an exposure with warm cast lamps like that ?
     
  5. jimgalli

    jimgalli Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,571
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Tonopah Neva
    Shooter:
    ULarge Format
    Hi Nick.

    Couple of things for you. Most everything I know is on a page here, and it links you to an earlier page with my developer formulae.

    Remember that APHS only sees blue. So your powerful lamps may not impress it much. Open shade works as well or better than anything with it. In fact the flatter the better as you'll get plenty of contrast in the film even with a flat scene. I rate it at ASA 3. Good luck.
     
  6. nick mulder

    nick mulder Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,204
    Joined:
    May 15, 2005
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    hmmm,

    Trying to avoid it as I love the control I have over lighting and the backdrop in a studio (which is to say, living room) but maybe I'll bite the bullet and try an outdoor setting just to get the light I'm after - suspend a big ol' piece of diffusion overhead to soften any direct sun - the background though, so hard to find a good neutral setting and also without a bunch of onlookers making the subject self-conscious - research & recce ...

    (I'll find out if my film holders are light proof also :wink:)
     
  7. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

    Messages:
    8,003
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Hi,

    You can use various developers or mixtures of developers. I used to do it with HC-110 in various dilutions (usually anywhere from 1:63 to 1: 127), and it worked well, but I now prefer Dave Soemarko's LC-1 formula, which I found out about from the Christopher James Alt. Processes book. You vary mixtures to control the contrast. Remember that is is an ortho film, so it won't pick up warm light very well. One great thing (besides the fact that it is so cheap) is that you can somewhat develop it by inspection under a normal red safelight. (I develop in the dark unless making a brief inspection, however.) It does tend to get pinholes in my experience, so I would practice your film touch up skills!
     
  8. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, B
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    I've used APHS 8x10 in camera. I shot it at EI 3 and developed in LC-1B (same as LC-1 but is a single solution. You control contrast by dilution).
    The attached image was shot last summer on a very sunny day. I believe the exposure was 1 second long.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. nadsenoj

    nadsenoj Member

    Messages:
    14
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2004
    Shooter:
    4x5 Format
    I get good results using a rotary processor and Rodinal . 2 baths of 1+50 / 3.5 minutes each, water bath and fix. Good range for kallitype contact prints.
     
  10. Joe VanCleave

    Joe VanCleave Member

    Messages:
    618
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    Albuquerque,
    Shooter:
    Pinhole
    Pinholes

    Regarding the issue of pinholes, I initially thought they were because of the pH change going from developer to acid stop bath, but I still get them occasionally when using just a water stop bath.

    I'm of the opinion now that they are primarily a function of temperature change between solutions; I tended not to regulate my tray temperature in my garage-based darkroom for APHS, treating it much like paper. I make sure it's in the ballpark, but don't get serious about temperature regulation like with panchro sheet film. I'm going to change my working methods with APHS to regulate the temperature to a finer degree of control.

    ~Joe
     
  11. Nicholas Lindan

    Nicholas Lindan Advertiser Advertiser

    Messages:
    2,386
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Location:
    Cleveland, O
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I have had decent results at ASA 1 - 3, developed in LC-1. I couldn't get Jim Galli's Rodinal w/ Bromide & Benzotriazole to work - but I have never gotten along well with Rodinal... I have found Jim's instructions on developing 3x the image appearance time to be good advice.