Would like to start MF

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Markok765, Oct 24, 2007.

  1. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

    Messages:
    2,270
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2006
    Location:
    Ontario, Can
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I have a Beselar 67 enlarger. I shoot a holga, so I know how to develop it.

    I was recently in toronto and looked a photo from china. I think it was 30x40.

    The person there said that it was MF, scanned. I would like to print my own MF, and would like to get a real MF camera [no seagull,lubitel] I would like preferably 645 with RF, or a 6x6.

    So, in conclusion, I'm asking what:

    Camera in 600$ with lens, used

    Enlarger lens.

    Negative holder.

    I should get.

    Thank you all!
     
  2. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

    Messages:
    4,679
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Location:
    Italia
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If you're stuck on a RF then I think the only modern choice in your budget is one of the Fuji fixed lens cameras.

    If you can live with a SLR more choices. Bronica ETRSI should be well within your budget. Pentax 645 likely. I'd also expect the older Mamiya 645 to be possible.

    Depends on what features you want. The Bronica is a leaf shutter. The Pentax will have a built in meter and winder.
     
  3. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

    Messages:
    2,270
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2006
    Location:
    Ontario, Can
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I can live with a SLR, just RF is lighter.

    I have a Pentax spotmeter v, if that matters.
     
  4. kraker

    kraker Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,238
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2005
    Location:
    The Netherla
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If you're thinking of 6x6, a Mamiya C2xx/C3xx should be well within your budget. It's a big brick, but it's very versatile.
     
  5. Mick Fagan

    Mick Fagan Subscriber

    Messages:
    3,054
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2005
    Location:
    Melbourne Au
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Marko, haven't seen you for a while, must be heavy going at school.

    One of the interesting things about the Fuji 645 folder camera I once owned, is that the film gate is in portrait mode, when the camera is held normally to the eye.

    35mm film is in a landscape mode, when the camera is held normally.

    Therefore, if you wish to do a lot of landscape photography with a Fuji and/or many other 645 cameras, you may decide to go the 6x6 route instead. Certainly saves you turning the camera sideways for a landscape.

    A 75mm enlarging lens will cover 6x6, I personally prefer 80mm for 6x6. As your enlarger is a 6x7 type, why not get something that will cover up to 6x7. This means that when you get any negative from 645 through to a 6x7 negative from either your camera or somewhere else, you can comfortably enlarge it.

    I personally use a 105mm lens for enlarging 645 through to 6x7 negatives. The trade off is that for a given enlargement of the smaller 6x6 format you will have to lift the head slightly higher.
     
  6. mcfactor

    mcfactor Member

    Messages:
    183
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    Shooter:
    Med. Format RF
    They are slightly more expensive, but the mamiya rangefinders are great. i saw the mamiya 6 for around $600 somewhere on the web (maybe ebay). I have a mamiya 7 and i just did a 40x50 color print (inkjet scan) that looked great (the film was fujipro 160S).
     
  7. Ole

    Ole Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    9,284
    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2002
    Location:
    Bergen, Norw
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    A Bronica ETRS with 75mm lens, back and finder should be less than $200. I believe that this is the best value for money you will find at the moment!

    Enlarger lens - I use a Meopta Anaret-S 80mm myself. But with corrent second-hand darkroom prices, I would look for a Rodagon, Componon or similar.
     
  8. matti

    matti Member

    Messages:
    652
    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Location:
    Stockholm, S
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I like my Rolleiflex. But then I never change my 50mm lens on the Leica either, so pretty much like that perspective.
    /matti
     
  9. Toffle

    Toffle Member

    Messages:
    1,798
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Location:
    Point Pelee,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I know everyone has their own preferences, but if you have the 67, you might want to consider shooting 6X7 negatives. You can catch a lot of detail on a 6X7 negative.The Bronica GS-1 is a great camera, and considered light for its class. I picked mine up in "bargain" condition from KEH in July, and have shot virtually nothing else since. You would need an enlarger lens of at least 80mm for this size negative.

    You can get a GS-1 with a 100mm normal lens, a prism or waist level finder and maybe even a speed winder grip well within your budget. (with money left over to get a half-decent tripod... they say it's light, but you'd find hand-holding very tiring after only a few rolls.)

    I know this doesn't make the choice any easier. Part of the fun is just finding out what's available.
    Cheers,
     
  10. MenacingTourist

    MenacingTourist Member

    Messages:
    895
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2004
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Also consider if you want to go big with your enlargements and want the sharpest negs you want to shoot on a tripod. Consider the RB67. It's amazingly cheap and the lenses are very good. I shoot one with a 90 and 180 but if I didn't shoot LF I'd get a wide angle for it.

    There are other similar systems for similar prices out there. You'll certainly find a complete set up for your price. Just look around for a while.

    Alan.
     
  11. Michel Hardy-Vallée

    Michel Hardy-Vallée Membership Council

    Messages:
    4,351
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Montréal (QC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The Rapid-Omega is big and heavy, but its lenses are awesome and for 600$ you could have the body, two backs, and two lenses.
     
  12. Marc Akemann

    Marc Akemann Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,272
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2005
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Another really nice thing about the RB, is the rotating back. Without it, moving the RB67 on it's side for a vertical would be like moving a car battery on it's side. Lenses are excellent.

    The Bronica GS-1 is a nice choice, too. No rotating back, but it's lighter and the lenses are also excellent.

    I shoot with a Bronica EC-TL system and Nikkor lenses. Maybe not the best choice, but it's fun to use and I use Nikkor lenses for every format I shoot. Also, it's inexpensive, but hard to find all that you might want, like backs and prisms. 645 backs are really difficult to find for this system.

    These days, you've got tons of choices with prices that are unbelievable, compared to just a few years ago. All of the suggestions from previous posts are good ones.

    Marc
     
  13. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

    Messages:
    2,270
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2006
    Location:
    Ontario, Can
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Wow! And most of these are cheaper than a used Nikon F5!

    Thanks, I'll write these down, and ask when I go to Henrys Toronto.
     
  14. raizans

    raizans Member

    Messages:
    129
    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2004
    these cameras are around your price range:

    $400 fuji ga645 (60mm lens, fixed)
    $700 bronica rf645 (65mm lens, interchangeable)
    $600 rolleiflex 3.5f (75mm, fixed)
    $700 fuji gw670iii (90mm, fixed)

    who was the photographer whose print you saw?
     
  15. Nick Zentena

    Nick Zentena Member

    Messages:
    4,679
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Location:
    Italia
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Wait you're shopping at Henry's? Take all the prices and multiply by 3x :surprised:
     
  16. Markok765

    Markok765 Member

    Messages:
    2,270
    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2006
    Location:
    Ontario, Can
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    any other good Toronto stores?

    I really can't remember the photographer.