Would your wife kill you if you used photo chems in the kitchen?

Discussion in 'Contact Printing' started by Mainecoonmaniac, May 16, 2014.

  1. Mainecoonmaniac

    Mainecoonmaniac Subscriber

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  2. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    some people do it...

    they process all sorts of stuff color + b/w
    and don't give it a second though .. unfortunately
    but i wouldn't do that to my worst enemy.

    oxcalates don't like humans very much. not sure how much is in
    the oxalic developer used to developer pt/pd prints
    but its not a fun way to die ...

    ( there are a few "how to process color print/ slide" videos on you tube
    with the guy doing it in his kitchen sink ... the comments were not kind. )
     
  3. Dr Croubie

    Dr Croubie Member

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    I do it all the time, the kitchen is the only bench with a sink with enough space for beakers and things (bathrooms and laundry are just big tubs with no bench).
    Nothing worse than ilford/kodak/rodinal chems, no alt processes ... yet.
     
  4. Pioneer

    Pioneer Member

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    I do all my b+w developing at the kitchen sink. 35mm through 8x10. Nothing goes down the drain.

    About half of my color is done by a pro lab but what color work I do at home is done with a CPE2+ in the darkroom. Chemicals transported in a 5 gallon bucket to a chemical disposal area.

    My paper developing, which is currently all b+w, is done in BTZS tubes in the bathroom tub because the tubes are too long to use my kitchen sink.

    I do not prepare food or drink until the area has been completely cleaned each time.
     
  5. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    No
     
  6. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    I'm not married!:smile::tongue:

    Jeff
     
  7. bdilgard

    bdilgard Subscriber

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    I'm more concerned about raw chicken in the sink.
     
  8. hoffy

    hoffy Member

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    The wife? No, because it would never come to that. I'm paranoid enough about it on my own.
     
  9. MattKing

    MattKing Subscriber

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    +1

    Or the non-photographic chemicals under the sink.

    The (relatively benign) chemicals I use in my photography are chemicals that I am familiar with, know how to handle, know how to clean up and treat with respect - so I do.
     
  10. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

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    The only thing I would not do (and looks like he does not) is blow dry the coated paper. That kicks up platinum salts into the air and that can be very nasty to the lungs. So it would not be nice to have platinum salts flying around the kitchen.

    The toxic and potentially toxic effects of platinum in workers are believed to be related to certain water-soluble platinum salts (e.g., potassium hexachloroplatinate, potassium tetrachloroplatinate, sodium chloroplatinate and ammonium chloroplatinate). Inhalation exposure to these platinum salts is known to give rise to manifestations of respiratory allergy. The first report of such reactions to platinum compounds appeared in 1911 among photographic workers who suffered respiratory and skin disorders. Similar clinical manifestations—rhinitis, conjunctivitis, asthma, urticaria and contact dermatitis—have since been reported mainly in platinum refinery workers and chemists.

    From: http://www.ilo.org/oshenc/part-ix/metals-chemical-properties-and-toxicity/item/183-platinum

    Bold are mine.

    I have developed permanent asthma from 5 years of platinum printing, but since then have switched to air-drying and have had no major reactions to it (and get better prints).
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 16, 2014
  11. ntenny

    ntenny Member

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    I asked my wife if she would kill me, and she made a spluttering laughing noise. Not sure if that meant yes or no.

    In any case, the only photo chemistry I use I'm there is Caffenol. Too much potential for Bad Things.

    -NT
     
  12. Valerie

    Valerie Subscriber

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    my wife would not mind at all.

    My husband, on the other hand, might take issue.
     
  13. sly

    sly Subscriber

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    Valerie, I was just about to mention my husband, when your reply popped up.
    He's the chief dish washer, so he's in charge. He might also be wondering why I'm not using the perfectly usable darkroom he built me.
     
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  15. grahamp

    grahamp Subscriber

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    My wife wouldn't kill me. But if I generated a lot of respiratory irritants in the house it might be the other way around. Asthma can be fatal.

    But ultimately, what I would or would not do is not really relevant - people do lots of things I would not :cool:
     
  16. Ian Leake

    Ian Leake Subscriber

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    In the grand scheme of things the common Pt/Pd chemicals are not particularly bad, except for the contrast control agents.

    The common contrast control agents (potassium chlorate, dichromates) are highly toxic and carcinogenic. I'm not sure about the toxicity of 'Na2'.

    Platinum is toxic but not life-threatening. It can cause respiratory problems (as noted earlier in the thread). If you Google 'Potassium Chloroplatinite' you'll find a reference to someone who tried to commit suicide by drinking some. They failed.

    The commonly used clearing agents are not particularly toxic in the quantities we use.

    Having said all that, it is far, far better to keep photographic chemicals out of the kitchen.
     
  17. AgX

    AgX Member

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    Oxalates are common in nature. We regularly have it in our kitchens as it is an ingredient in Spinache and Rhubarb, but also in Cocoa. We also use it at home as ingredient in special washing agents.


    I assume the greatest threat in the kitchen to be Salmonella.


    Though I would advice a darkoom novice to keep out of the kitchen for principle reasons.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2014
  18. AgX

    AgX Member

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    On the other hand it makes not much sense to ban all photographic activity from the kitchen, but then to put photo chemicals in beverage bottles and place them somewhere in the house.
     
  19. andrew.roos

    andrew.roos Member

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    She hasn't yet.

    I do all my B&W developing in the kitchen. I also use the microwave for bringing chemicals that have been refrigerated up to room temp. I use my own containers, jugs, spoons, washing up cloths etc (which are stored in the darkroom between use), clean everything up thoroughly before and afterwards, and don't work while the kitchen is being used for cooking. I also never leave chemicals out while I am not present - everything gets cleaned up properly and all the chemicals put away before I leave the room.

    Nice video BTW.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2014
  20. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    yup,
    but if you eat rhubarb leaves which are high in oxalates
    (from what i understand and it might be wrong )
    it leeches the calcium from your bones and leaves
    you a quivering mess on the floor ...
    maybe that's how they get bone-less chickens at the ranch ?
     
  21. Sirius Glass

    Sirius Glass Subscriber

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    But then again I am divorced.
     
  22. snapguy

    snapguy Member

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    old daze

    Back in the "Good Ol' Days" of film darkrooms (in the 1990s) the EPA came by the little rural newspaper where I was working. We developed black and white and made b&w prints and used the regular chemicals one used at that time. The EPA guy said they could fine us $15,000 a day for sticking that stuff down the sewer pipe. It is something to think about.
     
  23. momus

    momus Member

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    No. I have one set of cabinets under the microwave, and she and the cat know that everything that's related to B&W film developing goes under there. The cat is only interested in the pantry door, and seems to go in there now and then at night to check on her food cans and bags, but she's unpredictable, so I have the film cabinet door fixed so that she can't paw it open and go exploring.

    All the enlarger and print related stuff is in one of the bathrooms, and the cameras are in a dresser drawer. The negs folder is on the kitchen table.... A full darkroom would really be nice.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2014
  24. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    My darkroom is in the basement, and I share water source with the laundry area. I develop film and wash prints in the utility sink there.

    We have three cats, so I thoroughly clean the area after each use, using tray cleaner or Permawash on spots of chemicals, and then wash the sink down and mop the floor. I don't think it's actually necessary because I'm very careful when I work, but it helps keep the place tidy and sanitary.

    I would not use photography chemicals in the kitchen. If not for health reasons, then at least for peace of mind.
     
  25. Pioneer

    Pioneer Member

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    That's it!! That's gotta be it!!

    I just knew there had to be something wrong with me!

    I ate too much rhubarb as a kid...

    (What's that dear? You say that isn't what's wrong with me? You sure?)
     
  26. jnanian

    jnanian Advertiser Advertiser

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    its not the rhubarb
    its the LEAVES
    just had strawberry rhubarb pie a few days ago
    and it was tasty !