Wratten X1 green filter

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by ymc226, Oct 6, 2011.

  1. ymc226

    ymc226 Member

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    Didn't find any Series VIII green filters by any of the major makers new anymore.

    I am interested in a green filter to lighten foliage. There is a used series VIII filter marked Wratten X1 green. Would this be appropriate to lighten vegetation and about how many stops would one lose?
     
  2. DWThomas

    DWThomas Subscriber

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    A crib sheet I found on the Internet a few years back (and apparently no longer up) says:

    An X2 would be stronger. I haven't used either in recent memory, so can't add much.
     
  3. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    I have a "G" (med. green) for Hasselblad here that is marked 3x/-1.5
    I have a "YG" (light yellow greenish) that is marked 2x/-1

    I always remembered the dark green ones for foliage were close to 2.5-3 stops but haven't used one in years.
    If no one knows exactly I can try to dig up a wratten series 6 I have somewhere but keep in mind if it's a gelatin type they can fade. Best thing to do is test and hold it over your handheld meter and compare against unmetered.
     
  4. Jeff Kubach

    Jeff Kubach Member

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    Could you look up KEH or B&H?

    Jeff
     
  5. nworth

    nworth Subscriber

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    The No. 11 is yellow-green, but more green than some of the glass yellow-green filters. It is really pretty unique. It does a very fine job of general correction coupled with just enough lightening of foliage.
     
  6. hadeer

    hadeer Member

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    You could also try the Cokin system.
     
  7. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    I've been using a Cokin P series Green filter for well over 25 years, the beauty is the filter holder filts all my MF and 5x4 lenses with the right filter rings.

    Ian
     
  8. Ian C

    Ian C Member

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    Description of the effects of Hoya X(0) yellow-green (1.5 stops in daylight) and X(1) green filters (2-stops in daylight) are here.

    http://www.hoyafilter.com/products/hoya/cf-09.html


    Additional notes from Ira Tiffen on the Tiffen Filters site:

    “A green filter, such as Wratten #11, can be used to lighten green foliage, to show more detail. It may also be used to provide more pleasing skin tones outdoors, especially against blue sky.

    Any filter used for the above purposes will have a greater effect if slightly underexposed. Its function depends on absorbing light of its complementary colors to increase the proportion of light of colors similar to itself. Exposure compensation is often needed to allow proper image density, but the relative difference is reduced by the addition of light at the absorbed wavelengths through additional exposure.”