Write up on archival processing

Discussion in 'Presentation & Marketing' started by tkamiya, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Does anyone have a simple, to-the-point quick write-up on archival processing that I could use? I have a print I am going to present to someone and I'd like the recipient to know how it was processed, what to expect, and why.

    I'd like to make copies of this write-up so copyrighted materials are out. I can write my own but I'm having problem coming up with simple, yet effective writing.

    If anyone has one and willing to share, it would be deeply appreciated.
     
  2. jmain

    jmain Member

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    Color, B&W, fiber base, resin coated??
     
  3. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Oh, sorry.... B&W, FB, and happily printed.
     
  4. eddie

    eddie Subscriber

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    What, specifically, is your process?
     
  5. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Basically the archival processing described in most photography books, including Ralph's "Way More Than...".

    2 stage fixing, HCA, sufficient washing, toning (optional). Nothing special.
     
  6. eddie

    eddie Subscriber

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    Do you mean "Way Beyond..."?
     
  7. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    yes
     
  8. eddie

    eddie Subscriber

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    I don't think you need to say too much. HCA, fix and selenium will mean nothing to most people. How about something like:
    My work is printed on double weight fiber based silver gelatin papers, and archivally processed to the highest standards. The finished work is mounted using acid free materials, ensuring the longevity of your photograph.

    You can look at the websites of silver gel printers, and see how they word it, to get more (and better) ideas...
     
  9. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Right.

    I have no intentions of mentioning HCA, fix, and all that - as you say, those technical details mean nothing to the general public.

    I have seen a great article on someone's website once that explains archival B&W processing in everyday language. It was something like a half page long and was intended for non-photographers and "the buying public". Unfortunately, I don't remember where I saw it to ask for permissions.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 26, 2011
  10. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    How's this?

    This print was produced entirely by hand by me using a black and white film and time honored processes in a traditional darkroom. Materials and processes are of the highest quality currently available.

    The photograph was printed on a double-weight fiber based silver gelatin paper by projecting an image from the negative, then processed through multiple chemical baths to reveal the image, then washed and protected. The expected life span of the print is in excess of 100 years when kept in a protected environment. Please handle the print with care as oil from your hand can affect its future condition. Having it framed in archival quality material and UV protected glass or in an archival quality folder is the best way to display or store this photograph.
     
  11. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Can anyone help me with this? Would be very much appreciated.
     
  12. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    This looks pretty good to me, is the print toned?
     
  13. tkamiya

    tkamiya Member

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    Bob,

    Thank you for your reply. Some are, some aren't. When they aren't, they are, at minimum, treated in StabAG. (Sitan)

    I've tried very short Selenium toning. I didn't appreciate the slight (although very slight) density change especially in highlight. Toning isn't an absolute requirement for being "archival" is it? (or is it...?)
     
  14. jeffreyg

    jeffreyg Subscriber

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    I would indicate to the recipient that they have framing done by a framer that is familiar with photographic archival materials and if they were going some other route that they request acid free materials (especially in humid Florida) and the emulsion should not come in contact with the frame glass. Once they purchase your print it's theirs and what you say is just a disclaimer and a suggested way to preserve the print.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/
     
  15. holmburgers

    holmburgers Member

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    Toning definitely kicks the archival aspect up a couple notches. For instance, even in non-aesthetic situations like important old micro-fiche, these are often poly-sulfide toned solely for longevity.

    But, a well processed FB B&W print should last a long time on its own, with proper storage.