WTB: bar that holds lensboard in camera

Discussion in '[Classifieds] Want to Buy' started by nsurit, Jul 7, 2010.

  1. nsurit

    nsurit Subscriber

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    I'm looking for the sliding bar that holds the lens board in a Zone VI 4X5 camera.There is a lens I want to use that would require the little bar to be altered in order for it to close. Lens flange is too large and the bar would need to be ground down a bit. I don't want to alter the original Zone VI piece. Any ideas as to what might work. If so, let me know what you need for the part. Bill Barber
     
  2. jmcd

    jmcd Member

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    Perhaps a small strip of brass from the hardware store? It should be relatively easy bore out for the sliding action, and bend so you can get a grip on it.
     
  3. John Koehrer

    John Koehrer Subscriber

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    You can get them on the bay for ~$25 pr. Strip of brass would work for me.
    The Deardorff 5X7 used two oblong pieces of metal that simply rotated. Think about 1/2" long X 1/4" wide with a hole in the center. That would still use the original screws & attachment points.
    Make sure it's smooth or has a nylon/plastic surface on the inside so it doesn't scratch the finish
     
  4. mjs

    mjs Member

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    Strip of brass from hobby shop or hardware store; a Dremel tool will help you to cut, shape, and smooth it, or you can do pretty much everything you need with a file and a hand drill, it will just take a bit longer.

    Mike
     
  5. Roger Thoms

    Roger Thoms Subscriber

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    I just made some from strips of brass manufactured be K & S Engineering Which I purchased from the hardware store. I used basic had tools including a hacksaw, cordless drill, needle files, and a small combination square with scribe. I used a Sharpie marker for layout dye and then used the scribe to carefully layout the location of the slots. Then drill a series of holes and used the needle files to elongate the holes into a slot. In other words what mjs said.

    I did look at Dremel tools while at the hardware store purchasing brass, but the Dremel just wasn't in my budget.

    The clips btw are to hold the back on a pinhole camera that I'm building. http://www.apug.org/forums/forum62/78543-work-progress.html

    Roger
     

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    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2010
  6. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Wow, really nice job.
     
  7. nsurit

    nsurit Subscriber

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    Part found. Thanks to all who respoded and to Richard Ritter who had the piece. Bill Barber
     
  8. rrankin

    rrankin Member

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    I went to the local hardware store and explained the quest with my camera that had a similar problem. The guy found me a suitable piece of brass for $1.29 US that seems to fit the bill. It can be scored and broken with a utility knife, and drilled with a normal cheap drill for the screw holes. Brass screws were about $0.25 US each for it. Maybe Ace truly is 'the place with the helpful hardware man' ( or woman).
    Cheers,
    Richard
     
  9. Curt

    Curt Subscriber

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    That's an excellent way to do it, takes time and skill, but excellent. I used this same method to make an entire 4X5 wood field camera like the Zone IV. Layout, drill a series of holes and file out to create the slot.

    This is a fine example of hand craftsmanship, great work.
     
  10. Roger Thoms

    Roger Thoms Subscriber

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    Thanks, the parts were fun to make. Sounds like the OP found a good solution, Richard Ritter is great asset to the large format community

    Roger
     
  11. nsurit

    nsurit Subscriber

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    Yes, and reasonable.