X-Ray Film Reciprocity Effect

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Andrew O'Neill, May 17, 2010.

  1. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, B
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Incase anyone who uses x-ray film particularly CSX green latitude, here are some curves showing the effect of long exposures.

    The 1/8th sec curve represents normal. Some development compensation will most likely be needed as well, starting at the 10 second mark.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited by a moderator: May 17, 2010
  2. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, B
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Exposures were made under an enlarger with a 31 step stouffer wedge. Film developed in Rodinol 1+50 in a tray.
     
  3. Vaughn

    Vaughn Subscriber

    Messages:
    5,375
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2006
    Location:
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Nice curves, but how does the rate of failure relate to conventional films and TMax films? Just so that I can wrap my poor brain arounf it!

    Vaughn
     
  4. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, B
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Compared to X-Ray film:

    HP5+: 1s give 1/3rd stop more; 10s give 1.5x; 100s give 4x more exposure
    No development compensation required.


    TMY-2: 1s no compensation; 10s give 1.2x (1/3rd stop); 100s 4x more.
    No development compensation required.
     
  5. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, B
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Here is a rough tonal/colour sensitivity comparison between X-ray and TMY-2.
    Green does appear slightly lighter and darker for yellow and beyond.
    Tonally, TMY-2 is much much nicer. With the use of filters (#58 green filter for example) one could pretty much get it to look like the x-ray films colour response. Just with much nicer tonalities and sharpness.
    I do not have a film scanner, so please excuse the poor quality.
     

    Attached Files:

  6. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, B
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    After playing around with this film some more, it will not become my main film. I'll stick with HP5 and Timmy-2. I like smooth tonalities, sharpness, decent reciprocity characteristics, and a film that won't scratch so easily.
     
  7. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, B
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    Four years later, and I'm still using x-ray film both double-side green and single-sided blue. If you are careful, you can avoid scratches, even with flat-bottomed trays (which I prefer to use). Not my main film, but nice to have in certain situations.

    This was exposed on double-sided green latitude, unstripped. I prefer not to as a stripped neg's tones are mushy. Yes, the stripped neg is a tad sharper, but grain is more noticeable. To my eye, unstripped looks great and you only notice the softness in side-by-side comparisons. All of this is my opinion, of course!
     

    Attached Files:

  8. BetterSense

    BetterSense Member

    Messages:
    3,126
    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2008
    Location:
    North Caroli
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Under incandescent lighting, with exposures of 5-30 seconds, I found Green Latitude to be significantly faster than Foma 100. Like several stops faster. Foma 100 has legendarily bad reciprocity failure, but I find it interesting that even Xray film is better!
     
  9. Toffle

    Toffle Member

    Messages:
    1,859
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Location:
    Point Pelee,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Thanks for this, Andrew. I've been cutting Fuji HR-T Green 8x10 down to 4x5 for the last year or so with some really good results. It's good to have some clue about reciprocity performance on really long exposures. It seems to go very well with my pinhole work, but I've had a couple of longer exposures that fell off the chart, so to speak. On the other end of the scale, I've had difficulty with exposures under bright blue skies. I generally get good results at ISO 50, but under high UV situations, it appears much faster. Do you have any insights into the characteristics of this film?

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
  10. Tom1956

    Tom1956 Inactive

    Messages:
    2,025
    Joined:
    May 6, 2013
    Location:
    US
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Thread marked. Thank you for your work.
     
  11. Dr Croubie

    Dr Croubie Member

    Messages:
    2,002
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2013
    Location:
    rAdelaide
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Is that with or without a UV filter (or any other filters) in place?
     
  12. Toffle

    Toffle Member

    Messages:
    1,859
    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2007
    Location:
    Point Pelee,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    No filters in place. I guess technically I could use filters with my pinhole camera, but I've never tried.
     
  13. SawyerK

    SawyerK Member

    Messages:
    1
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2015
    Shooter:
    Pinhole
    Thanks for the curves. I've been building large pinhole cameras and shooting CXS green sensitive xray film but my exposures are so long, reciprocity was about to beat me. As far as developing, have you had better luck tray processing or tank processing. I'm shooting 14x17" sheets so tray processing is better for me, but I can't figure out how to control streaking. My film looks more like tye dye than else. I've been using GBX developer and replenisher and Sprint but I can't figure it out, have you ahd any luck with Sprint/d76?
     
  14. Andrew O'Neill

    Andrew O'Neill Subscriber

    Messages:
    1,262
    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2004
    Location:
    Coquitlam, B
    Shooter:
    8x10 Format
    You are very welcome! I prefer flat-bottomed trays for both 8x10 and 14x17. I've never had problems with streaking or mottling. I've not used those developers for x-ray, so I cannot comment. I have used D-76 in the past on conventional films, and I'm quite certain it would work with x-ray, diluted more than usual. I always give quite vigorous agitation, for the first 30 seconds, then 5 sec every minute. Make sure the film is completely covered with developer in the tray. My rule is as deep as the first knuckle on my middle finger...which is about an inch.