x-ray films

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Wade D, Apr 19, 2009.

  1. Wade D

    Wade D Member

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    I have some old GAF HR 3000, Kodak XG 14 & Kodak SO 185 films that were meant for rapid processing. Would any modern B&W devs. be able to process these? Perhaps a strong dilution of HC110 might work? These are old stock gotten from an x-ray lab that had closed so there was no cost. I just thought it might be fun to experiment with them so I really would like a starting point. If it's not possible then no big deal.
    Thanks,
    Wade
     
  2. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    I've used Sprint print developer for X-ray film and Dektol as well. Each is a bit strong in print concentrations, but I haven't done enough experimentation to find the right dose yet. HC110 should work, since it will do paper as well as film, but it seems too expensive to me to use a one-shot solution for old x-ray film.... but then I'm cheap.

    The film I use is supposedly repackaged Kodak green-sensitive. I rate it at 25 inside, with incandescent lamps and 400 outside. It does build up density quickly since it has emulsion of both sides. Two coats for the exposure of one, you might say.
     
  3. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    You can develop X-ray film in ANY b/w film developer without problems. You will have to do some tests to determine correct development time. You may also have to test to determine ISO speed for pictorial photography. You don't need to use developer in "one-shot" form. You can use your tank developer.

    If you like X-ray films, you can get new boxes of 100 sheets of 8x10 for about 25 cents per sheet. It is dirt cheap.
     
  4. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    Here is an example of High Speed Blue Sensitive X-ray film exposed at ISO 200 and developed for 4 minutes in X-tol straight. This is an 8x10 negative, and the film costs about 27 cents a sheet in that size. This is not meant to be an "art" image, rather I was testing various films shooting out the back of my studio.
     

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  5. Wade D

    Wade D Member

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    Thanks for the tips. I have plenty of this old stock to play with so a little testing won't deplete what I have. If I am not mistaken these films can be handled under a red safelight so I can cut them to 4x5 & 8x10 without trimming my fingernails too short.:wink:
     
  6. phfitz

    phfitz Member

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    Just developed some test shots of Kodak 'TMG/RA1' dental film
    seems to be 100 speed in sunlight
    10 min in D76 is WAY too much, will try 7 min next batch
    it is Ortho color balance, magenta is dark, red is really dark
    grain and sharpness is like Plus-X sheet film
    not as hardened as TMax, it will scratch, but not too delicate
    only thing I don't like is no locator notch in upper right, can't tell if it's backward in holder
    it was REALLY cheap for 8x10, should be fun to play with.
     
  7. PHOTOTONE

    PHOTOTONE Member

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    There is no need for a notch, because there is emulsion on both sides of the film, so it doesn't matter which side faces the lens.
     
  8. phfitz

    phfitz Member

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    "There is no need for a notch, because there is emulsion on both sides of the film, so it doesn't matter which side faces the lens."

    Thats handy, didn't notice any double-image or halation around the highlights. Love the rounded corners, easier to load the holders.

    Does beg the question, how is it cheaper than regular film? Double sided high-tech emulsion on top shelf polyester base.

    I guess it's going to beat-up the fixer fairly quickly. Fully dry on the light box, 200 speed has nice shadow detail, may just rate this at 320 for portraits, Ortho Tri-X.