Yashica D

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Jitterbug, Aug 24, 2011.

  1. Jitterbug

    Jitterbug Member

    Messages:
    27
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Hello,
    As some of you may know, my previous MF camera was broken beyond reasonable repair.

    So, I was wondering, I found A Yashica D in a junk shop the other day for $95, in working order, as far as I can tell. My 2 questions are;

    1 Is this a reasonable price?

    2 What should I check for to make sure it is woking fully?
     
  2. pbromaghin

    pbromaghin Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,036
    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2010
    Location:
    Castle Rock,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Looking on the Bay the buy-it-now prices very from $60 to $400. the $60 one looks pretty rough and the $400 one looks like it just came out of the box. $95 sounds right to me. Offer him $70.

    Ask if you can put a roll through it, maybe even without leaving the store, and see how it goes.
     
  3. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

    Messages:
    2,571
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2004
    Location:
    Phoeinx Ariz
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    The D was avialble with both the 3 element Yashicor and the 4 element Yashiair, or is it the other way around? At any rate $100 for the 4 element seems to be the ball park for a D in good shape, but high for the 3 element lens. I have both D and 124s and like D for multiple exposures, the 124 with the crank is faster.
     
  4. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Subscriber

    Messages:
    714
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    1) It's an ok price but not great. You say a 'junk' shop. I would either get a 14 day return, or have them knock the price down to $75. Unless it has the Yashinon lenses, where this is a good price if the rest of the camera is in usable shape.



    2) DO NOT use the self timer. If you really must play with it, the flash sync MUST be set to X. Be prepared for it to grind to a halt. IF SET TO X, a light pressure on the lever should make it run out. Again, best to just ignore for now unless you KNOW it is critical for what you will be doing.

    Seriously, DO NOT TRY THE SELF TIMER if the flash sync is set to M.

    Open the back, put the shutter on B, open the aperture all the way, hold the shutter down while looking through the lens. You'll know if something is wrong- it should be clear.

    Take a flash light to the front lens, glance it sideways, look for scratches, etc.

    Try the shutter at different speeds. The odds are that it will be slow at slower speeds. This involves a cleaning, but if oyu don't use slow speeds, it won't be a problem. It's more of an indicator of age and dirt and lack of use.

    Take an empty spool along. Put tape along one edge of the central core, and place this end at the left so the silver gear inside the take-up area rides on the tape (well, tape isn't required, just makes the counter work smoother). Close the back, wind the 'film.' It should stop at one. Push the center button on the wind knob, release it, then wind again. It should stop at 2.... keep going and test all numbers.

    I prefer to bring an actual roll of film. I have some junkers for this. Load, wind to start, close and wind, etc. Except when I get to 12, I open the back up and look at where the film is positioned. There should be an inch or two still below the film gate. If not, there are some serious frame spacing issues.

    OK, now for the viewfinder. See if it opens and closes easily. Make certain that there is a magnifier lens in the flip-up magnifier (the glass is removable). The odds are that the view will be a bit dirty and dim. Fixable with a cleaning and new mirror most times. When closed, the inner panel should sit evenly in the opening. Check for paint chips and wear- a good indicator of overall handling and care over its life.

    Find an object at inifnity- 150 feet or more. See if the viewfinder shows it crisp, or if focus goes past infinity. Not a killer but an indicator of alignment problems.

    Focus- go back and forth. Feel for bumps, jumps, binding, etc. Watch the front panel to see if it makes any twists or bends while focusing in and out.

    Put the lens on infinity and look at where the back of the lens panel meets the body. This should be pretty even all around. It should not touch the main body before infinity, actually should stop just shy of the main body. If one side hits first while the other is still moving, alignment issue.

    Check the mating between the main body and the back. That joint should be even and tight all around.

    And then, how's it feel? You like its balance? How the shutter release acts? The viewfinder? Could you see using this camera day after day? A mint camera that doesn't feel right ain't worth anything to you if you want a user.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 24, 2011
  5. jp498

    jp498 Member

    Messages:
    1,467
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    If it's in good working order, per Dan's testing, it's worth the asking with either 3 or 4 element lens. It's always good to get something you know is good in person than something you can get on Ebay of unknown condition.
     
  6. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,396
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    northern Pa.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    First thing I do in a junk shop is offer half price, and dicker from there. You would be surprised at how often you can get things for that. I use a "dummy" roll(respooled backing with no film)to test the film advance, you can open the back at any time without ruining film.
     
  7. michaelbsc

    michaelbsc Member

    Messages:
    2,106
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2007
    Location:
    South Caroli
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yeah, it's far less of a gamble if you can hold it, or get one from someone here, than risking eBay.

    As for the the 3 element Yashikor vs. the 4 element Yashinon I would say use it as a bargaining chip, but unless you are trying to take very critical pictures it's not much difference. True, one can see a difference on a wide open Yashikor and a wide open Yashinon. But you get stopped down to f/8 pr f/11 and you need a loupe. Who looks at pictures with a loupe or a big enlargement?

    Neither of them are going to give a good Rollei a challenge, but I do think there's a case to be made about bang for the buck. There's a lot of bang in a Yashica for not too many bucks, especially if you can whittle $25 or 30 off for that "cheap triplet" lens.

    MB
     
  8. mgb74

    mgb74 Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,911
    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    Minneapolis,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I think $95 is high from a "junk shop", unless a) pristine, b) has the 4 element Yashinon lens, and c) can be returned for cash refund (not store credit).

    I think most of these 2nd hand shops have unrealistic expectations of value given the condition of their items. Or, as Rick suggests, they are testing the water to see if anyone bites at/near their asking price.

    So, assuming it's a bit dirty/dusty (but otherwise OK), has the 3 element lens (likely), and you can test in the store but not return if after buying, I'd offer $55-60 and not go over $75-80.

    When checking the lens, look for any signs of separation or fungus (more an issue than scratches). Also, focus at an object 20-30 feet away and see if the distance scale is correct. If not, the mirror may have slipped it's mount.
     
  9. jp498

    jp498 Member

    Messages:
    1,467
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I've got a Yashica-C with the 3-element lens, and it's not quite as sharp as a Rolleiflex with a tessar at a middle aperture, it's perfectly excellent for 11x11" prints even wide open. The Rolleiflex clearly comes ahead on 16x16" prints, but I print so few of those, I don't worry about it, and would probably use LF for images I expect to make that size. Wide open, the 3-element is a little swirly if you have a complex shadowy background like a wood scene. f5.6 and smaller, it's a sleeper lens better than most people would suspect. It's nice to use.

    Of course, it's worth talking them down a little; if they sold it online, they'd be in it quite a bit for fees and posting/shipping labor.
     
  10. BobD

    BobD Member

    Messages:
    444
    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2006
    Location:
    California,
    Shooter:
    35mm
    If it's a junk shop, offer them some junk for it. :smile:
     
  11. Jitterbug

    Jitterbug Member

    Messages:
    27
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Oh my! So many replies so soon.

    I will try to test it as soon as I can. I'm most worried about offending him by offering too little. I am very poor at striking deals.

    Also, do they still make compatible flash guns?
     
  12. jp498

    jp498 Member

    Messages:
    1,467
    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Location:
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It takes a PC connection flash, which means you can hook about anything up to it. I use my C with white lightning studio flash. If you have some sort of flash that uses a PC cable (or a shoe adaptor to provide the PC cable link), that would be good for testing that feature of the camera.

    A dealer won't be personally offended by a low offer, but might try harder to work you up to a bigger price.

    Trading some junk is always an option. I traded a box of old cameras that probably didn't work or didn't work well for a big set of rolleiflex bay-I filters. (Fits my yashica-c and rolleiflex) I got something useful out of it, and he got a bunch of things to clean up and sell.
     
  13. Jitterbug

    Jitterbug Member

    Messages:
    27
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm
    What happens if the flash isn't set to X when the self timer is started?
     
  14. Sponsored Ad
  15. 2F/2F

    2F/2F Member

    Messages:
    8,005
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Location:
    Los Angeles,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I don't think I would go for that camera. I sold mine for $25, and all it needed was a shutter repair that you or I could do with online instructions. It was pretty clean cosmetically. When I priced them on E-Bay before putting it up for sale, it seemed like they were going for no more than $100 in super nice condition, and for an average of $50 or $60.

    As much as I like to support local shops, they can often be very, very, VERY far out of touch as far as pricing goes.
     
  16. Newt_on_Swings

    Newt_on_Swings Member

    Messages:
    2,129
    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2011
    Location:
    NYC
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    I got my YasicaFlex C for ~$20 bucks, very good cosmetic condition, but the shutter was sticky, I took off the front element to and fixed it. Self timer is busted, it swings freely, but hey I would never use it anyway. never tried the flash sync.
     
  17. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Subscriber

    Messages:
    714
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Self-timer destruction-
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/hugojcardoso/3897068664/

    If you look at the casing at the upper left, where the lever with the red dot goes out, you'll see a double thickness of wall to the right of that lever. Ideally, when the flash sync is set to M, the inner 'wall' slides up and blocks the self-timer lever (red dot) from being moved.

    I don't understand what happens. I do know that the blue steel spring clip noted in that photo gets bent in a bad way. The one time I had to deal with this (on a D, not that it matters), I gutted most of the self-timer and simply gave the guy a camera without one.

    Simply don't tempt fate. Get a chunk of plastic or cardboard and block off the sync lever from moving. When I open up a front for shutter cleaning, I break that lever off. It can be slid back and forth with a small screwdriver in the slot, but I have no worries about it being bumped, about handing it to someone and having them do the classic, 'So what's this lever.... oh... oops..." move
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 25, 2011
  18. Jitterbug

    Jitterbug Member

    Messages:
    27
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Oh, Note to self, double check flash when using self timer, and never let someone else use the camera...

    Are there any querks about this model I should be aware of?
     
  19. Jitterbug

    Jitterbug Member

    Messages:
    27
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Well, maybe I should say quirks other than the self timer issue.
     
  20. Dan Daniel

    Dan Daniel Subscriber

    Messages:
    714
    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Well, this says more about me than about the camera, but I made a mistake in winding when I first used one. I would push the button in the middle of the wind know and then HOLD IT IN while I started to wind. Nope, wrong!! Simply push the button in and let go, THEN wind. I'm not sure what had me doing it the other way, holding it in while starting to wind, since people I have mentioned this to seem confused that I would even try such a thing. Anyway, push, release, wind.

    And best to settle on a pattern for winding the film on cameras with no double exposure prevention system. I simply ALWAYS wind right after a shot to avoid confusion.

    There is no cable release. You need a 'Leica nipple' or Nikon nipple.

    Get a lens hood. Use it. The Yashicas are prone to flare and fog. For another source for flare, kill reflections on the inside of the film chamber. Here's what I did-
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/yashica_tlr/discuss/72157622734630140/

    Yashica TLRs are known for oil condensing on the front of the back element set. With a little courage and patience, it's easy to clean off-
    http://www.flickr.com/groups/yashicamat/discuss/72157627178245926/

    The Yashica-D is a nice camera. Much simpler than the 'Mats in the wind mechanism. Yet pretty much the same camera- same focus rails, basic body casting, hood, etc. Light. Probably the best value in a 'quality' TLR if you get one in decent shape and at a decent price.

    There are so many Yashica TLRs out here, try not to get attached to just one. If the one in your hand isn't working or such, there will be another one along soon. I found them great cameras for learning repair and 'deconstruction' with, since they are cheap enough that I could take the chance, but built well enough to actually learn something.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 25, 2011
  21. Paul Howell

    Paul Howell Member

    Messages:
    2,571
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2004
    Location:
    Phoeinx Ariz
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    For filter and lens hood, S5 bayonet can be hard to find, I used silicon to gule a S VI filter adaptor to the taking lens, has 2 rings, a S VI filter fits in the sandwich and a lens shade screws into the front. The silicon will pell away, need to be very careful so you dont any in the shutter.
     
  22. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,396
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    northern Pa.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Yashica D uses Bayonet 1 ( Bayonet 30 ) accessories. Plastic lens hoods and filters are available, hoods are cheap, filters no so cheap. These are not fragile cameras, but are somewhat quirky. Don't change shutter speeds after cocking shutter, don't use self timer with flash selectot on M are about the only things to remember, except maybe when advancing film, just push the button on the winder knob then let it go before winding film. The instructions are available from Butkus on line. Buy the durned thing and have a blast shooting it.
     
  23. Roger Cole

    Roger Cole Member

    Messages:
    5,462
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Location:
    Atlanta GA
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    Don't change shutter speeds after cocking the shutter??

    The other thing is easy enough not to do considering how often I use the self timer (almost never) but that one is - weird.
     
  24. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

    Messages:
    7,396
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2009
    Location:
    northern Pa.
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    It states in the manual to never change shutter speed after the shutter is cocked, I believe under taking pictures. After owning two different D's over the years, I was afraid to change shutter speed with my Mat LM until I realized the shutter cocked automatically when winding the film and I had no choice.
     
  25. Athiril

    Athiril Subscriber

    Messages:
    2,931
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2009
    Location:
    Melbourne, V
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I use Canon-based RF-602's/600's wireless triggers from ebay with YongNuo YN-460 II flashes on my Mamiya RB67, they'll work on any PC-sync camera with X-sync.
     
  26. Jitterbug

    Jitterbug Member

    Messages:
    27
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2010
    Shooter:
    35mm
    Well, it all checked out, so I bought it. I will be getting it for a Christmas gift, so I can tell how it works then. =)