Yashica FX3 super 2000 help

Discussion in '35mm Cameras and Accessories' started by margou, Dec 12, 2013.

  1. margou

    margou Member

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    Hi guys!
    I love analog photograph but I'm a huge dumb about it. My mom has an old Yashica FX3 super 2000 and I'm trying to learn some things with it. I took it to fix some things, it's supposedly good now but almost every photos that I took until now are ruined. This will probably be a very stupid question, maybe I'm just doing something wrong. In one film of 24 photos we can only see about 6 of them but they are very dark and the colors are distorted. And it has happened twice.
    Here's some examples:

    ---_0007.jpg ---_0005.jpg F1000008.JPG

    Any thoughts about what could be? Am I doing something wrong, is it the camera, and how can I fix it?
    Thank you very much in advance!!
     
  2. David Lyga

    David Lyga Subscriber

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  3. pstake

    pstake Member

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    Are you aware of how to use its built in meter? I have the same camera and it's one of my favorites. I have had good luck with the meter, too, which means it yields good exposures for me.

    If you are setting your shutter/aperture so that the green light comes on in the viewfinder, and you're still getting underexposed photographs, then either your meter is wrong or your shutter speeds are off or your aperture is closing down too far. It's pretty unlikely that you're aperture is closed down too far so shutter speed or meter would be my first guess.

    If you have another camera with a meter that you know works, or a handheld meter (or an iPhone with a light meter app), you can test the FX-3 against the meter and see if it's close.
     
  4. David Lyga

    David Lyga Subscriber

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    And, piggybacking on pstake, do check the film speed you have set. Actually, color negative film should be set at HALF the box speed for better color rendition.

    The first photo is grossly underexposed, fairly common with flash because of the overrating that flash manufacturers typically gave to their product. I'll bet that that negative is pathetically weak.

    The second photograph is actually 'correctly' done but, because of the extremely bright sunlight beyond the trees, the meter 'thinks' that the whole scene is far brighter that it really is, and, as a result, gives less exposure than needed. You have to correct for that situation (called 'backlighting') and give more exposure when you think that your negative will be underexposed. Sometimes that intelligent meter can, also, be 'huge dumb' and has to be overridden.

    The whole problem could (not necessarily is, though) be underexposure. Again, what do those all important negatives look like. Is all the detail there in big, bold colors? I think not. If you have weak negatives you have bad prints. Period.

    Your particular camera is one of the most underrated out there. And, generally, I did not like the Yashicas, but this one with mechanical shutter is fabulous and usually dead on accurate. - David Lyga
     
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  5. dynachrome

    dynachrome Member

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    I don't agree that you need to set the meter for color negative film at half the box speed. It's true that color negative film is more tolerant of underexposure than overexposure but careful metering can help. Light meters are calibrated to 18% gray. If you point your camera/meter at something brighter than a mid tone and do not compensate for the extra brightness by giving additional exposure then you will get an underexposed frame. To practice this, try metering off of an 18% gray card. In a situation where you are not metering off of a mid tone, adding one stop of exposure can help but this will not always be the level of exposure correction you need. If metering is done properly then you can shoot color negative film at box speed and get good results. Each camera has a different kind of metering. There is average metering, center weighted metering, bottom center weighted metering, spot metering and matrix metering. None of these systems will give you a perfect exposure in all situations but each will allow you to get as close to a good exposure as you need to get if you understand how to use it.
     
  6. David Lyga

    David Lyga Subscriber

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    It's true, dynachrome, that with CAREFUL metering you can go with box speed. But...with casual photographing, not paying too much attention to the fact that that meter might be misguided, one is better off using half that speed. In more cases than not, you will be rewarded with optimal print quality because those negatives will have the full rendition of what you are looking at, and for. - David Lyga
     
  7. Neal

    Neal Subscriber

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    Dear margou,

    I am guessing, of course, but I think that the film speed setting on the camera is set at too high a number. If you are unsure as to how to set this, you can find the manual here. Of course you should make sure you have a good battery.

    Further, set the camera to the speed using the number on the film box. If you are using the camera properly and it is working correctly you will get lovely photos. You can adjust the film speed after you've learned the basics. Finding a friend who is familiar with manual cameras is a good idea. They are easy to use once the basics are understood. In any case, make sure you go through the manual carefully. Cameras from that era are simple to understand and the Yashica manuals were good for teaching beginners.

    Good luck and let us know how things work out.

    Neal Wydra
     
  8. pstake

    pstake Member

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    I didn't even think of that. I bet that's exactly what it is.
     
  9. Nick Merritt

    Nick Merritt Member

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  10. E. von Hoegh

    E. von Hoegh Member

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  11. margou

    margou Member

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    Thank you very much. I took the camera to a professional before I started using and he said that there was a problem with the aperture but he fixed it. I believe the problem was really the film speed I had set. Now, thanks to all the explanations, I understood how it works and I'll pay attention to that next time.
    Thank you again, cheers!
     
  12. Tony-S

    Tony-S Member

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    That's not for the Super 2000. The Super 2000 is found here.