Your most recent discovery

Discussion in 'Photographers' started by michael_r, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    I'm curious to hear about some of your most recent discoveries in photography. I mean anything you've seen that gave you that sort of manic desire to make pictures, or just really appealed to you aesthetically. Something exciting.

    It doesn't have to be a photographer per se. It could be a book, a photographic movement, a style, or even a process or technique.

    It can also be a rediscovery, a return to something etc. So it doesn't have to be something or somebody contemporary or new at all.
     
  2. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    I cannot reveal who this is , but a young photographer has built in my estimation one of the largest darkrooms dedicated for his own personal work that I have ever seen.
    This young man's darkroom when finished will be able to output and mount 5 ft x 7ft silver gelatin murals without even breathing hard.
    All of his equipment is new, and ready to start producing work this fall.
    I thought my darkroom was big but do I ever have penis envy over this one.

    I have only seen darkrooms of this scope back in the early 80's when I worked at Jones and Morris Photo Enlarging , where we had monster rooms and horizontal enlargers to make huge murals.
    This is amazing young man will definately help keep the Silver Tradition alive for many years to come. I will let him come forth in his own time about himself and work , but I am completely blown away with this young man and his darkroom.

    Also Whiteys post about the Isenburg collection coming to Toronto, one I have never heard about this collection as well of AMC group here in Toronto, I am aware of Mike Robinson and he is a teacher at Ryerson and wondering if this collection is slated for this new gallery along with the Black Star Collection
     
  3. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    Sounds like it might be even bigger than Clyde Butcher's ridiculously gigantic darkroom. I've only seen photographs and some video but everything from the trays to the titanic Saltzman enlargers is just huge.
     
  4. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    Actually it is much larger and all brand new equipment. One 11x14 horizontal and one 8x10 horizontal laser aligned to a monster vacumn wall.
    I cannot tell you how odd this turn of events is to me.

     
  5. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    Well, it's nice to have the money for that I guess.
     
  6. andrew.roos

    andrew.roos Member

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    Film :smile:
     
  7. GuyS.

    GuyS. Member

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    Although I have been familiar with Richard Avedon's work for a number of years, it was only recently that I became aware of his In the American West project. I had seen many of the pictures before in magazine's and compilations of his work, but it wasn't until I got a copy of 'Avedon at Work, In the American West' by Laura Wilson did I really understand the relevance of the pictures together as a whole. Reading about his working style, why he was photographing the subjects he did, the way he undertook the whole project including the importance, and attention to detail of the final print, has been hugely inspirational to me. It made think hard about what I photograph and more importantly what is important to me to photograph.

    Other influences, can pop into your conscience out of nowhere. The current episode of 'Film' on the Framed Network highlights Belgium portrait photographer Jan Scholz. I'd never heard of him before the weekend. Its interesting to see how he's used social media, FlickR, Facebook etc to get his work out there. I like his pictures and style of shooting and the way he seems to flick almost randomly from format to format on a single shoot to get a different aesthetic. This is something I've never considered doing but will try now.
     
  8. Bob Carnie

    Bob Carnie Subscriber

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    ***Although I have been familiar with Richard Avedon's work for a number of years, it was only recently that I became aware of his In the American West project. I had seen many of the pictures before in magazine's and compilations of his work, but it wasn't until I got a copy of 'Avedon at Work, In the American West' by Laura Wilson did I really understand the relevance of the pictures together as a whole. Reading about his working style, why he was photographing the subjects he did, the way he undertook the whole project including the importance, and attention to detail of the final print, has been hugely inspirational to me. It made think hard about what I photograph and more importantly what is important to me to photograph.***

    What is even more incredible about this body of work is that he took over 15000 8x10 negatives and edited down to around 116 images, I can be corrected on this.
    But these numbers are quite remarkable if you start thinking about 1. buying 15000 sheets of film and 2. processing contacting and editing.
    This project was done over a relatively short period of time ,, In the book you refer to Avedon later in life was quoted as saying he wish he never quit this project.
    I agree , and would love to look at the out takes,, would take a few days though.
     
  9. bpenn

    bpenn Member

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  10. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    I have been printing primarily on matte papers for the last few years, and intend to keep doing so. But the other day I made three portraits on glossy paper, intended for a local collaboration among photographers, and it struck me how strong those blacks looked. I was very taken by the beauty and richness of those very low tones.
    Very simple, but to me a very interesting moment. My main reason for using matte paper is mostly how it feels in my hands, and how there are almost no undesirable reflections. But those blacks are not quite the same... :smile:
     
  11. michael_r

    michael_r Subscriber

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    This is what I was hoping for - a variety of things. I must admit Avedon is not a photographer I've spent much time on. Perhaps I'll look again.

    Thomas: I've waffled on matte vs glossy in the past. I print on glossy paper, but every now and then I get into a matte zone. There's definitely a unique tactile quality to matte surfaces for me, even though the density scale is shorter.
     
  12. Bertil

    Bertil Subscriber

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    APUG perhaps not the right forum for this "discovery" of mine, but some days ago I happend to come across a Swedish artist/designer, Sanna Dullaway
    (http://smashingpicture.com/famous-colorized-pictures-by-sanna-dullaway/), she is surprisingly good at (digitally) putting colour to old black and white icon pictures.
    I think her very sensitive colouring av Dorothea Lange's "Migrant mother" really crossed my b/w heart; for me, at least, this most impressive picture of Lange is even more impressive in Dullaway's colour version, unfortunately I must say, but I keep coming back to her version.
    Just her choice of putting some light blue to this mothers shirt, shows something about this mother and her situation that already is in Langes picture, but not perhaps seen by everyone before. I think I really discovered something with Sanna Dullaway's help!

    With this photoshop technic I suppose future generation will not view our "b/w history" in b/w anymore - it will be in colour, as it always has been.

    /Bertil
     
  13. Nick Merritt

    Nick Merritt Member

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    Actually, the local lab that I use for medium format recently got a new processor for C41, and it's a revelation -- like every one of my MF cameras has become terrific. (And by extension, my technique is apparently better than I thought it was!)
     
  14. Dali

    Dali Subscriber

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    "The garden of dust" by Bernard Plossu.

    Everyone might not be attracted by this work but I find it interesting as it pictures the American West in an unpretentious way. Prints are not small, very small, usual landscape tricks ((very)wide angle lens, heavy filtering (#25 Wratten and al.), contrasty prints) are absent, just rocks, plants (sometimes) and the sky. It is rather minimalist as if B. Plossu wanted to remove objects from the frame where most of the photographer would like to add elements to the pictures.
    To me, it is very relaxing, as if someone would quietly hike across Monument Valley or Canyonland NP and take very simple and natural shots. No rush, no stress, just the photographer and the landscape. This approach seems to be easy but it is more a state of mind than anything else.

    take care.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 9, 2012
  15. batwister

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  16. batwister

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    The colourized images are astonishing. Thanks for that.

    Also, as I've just used it for a few of the colour photos, this is a recent discovery - http://www.tineye.com/ - very useful for those photographs you don't recognise.
     
  17. Michael W

    Michael W Member

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    Last Saturday I sat in on a masterclass by Binh Danh at the ACP in Sydney. He currently has work in the Sydney Biennale. He is known for printing images onto leaves, but also showed some of his impressive daguerreotype images. I had been meaning to try Anthotypes for a while and I think this will hasten that process.
     
  18. Bill Burk

    Bill Burk Subscriber

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  19. Newt_on_Swings

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    Been going the old screw mount rangefinder route lately after the acquisition and fixing of a canon vit and a vt, and I'm starting to feel that lenses dont always have to be always pin sharp and super contrasty, the older glass performs very well and is actually quite pleasing, and handles very nicely.

    And on the other hand, my continued use of my fuji gw690ii and the negatives and prints i have been getting out of it, makes me want to sell off all my 35mm gear. not sure if this is a good thing or a bad thing, as gas has already made me invest deeply into Olympus and Nikon fast glass.

    Also that i want a freaking vacuum wall. how cool would that be to play with. better yet put it on its side and set on reverse, and you have a gigantic air hokey table!
     
  20. hoffy

    hoffy Member

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    While my local library's photographic book collection tends to mostly satisfy 'Dummys for digital' types or books of Ann Gedde :sleeping:, every so often you might find a gem or two. On my last trip I found the book "Where Do You Come From" by Aussie Photographer Raymond De Berquelle. I have to admit that so many of the images are timeless Australian and an excellent depiction of our country from the 60's to the 90's.
     
  21. Steve Smith

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    I took a free two day course on albumen printing a few weeks ago. This was something which I knew about but wasn't really interested in doing. However, I now intend to try it myself - as soon as I can afford some silver nitrate!


    Steve.
     
  22. brucemuir

    brucemuir Member

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    I saw 2 images recently that were double exposure with a lot of motion in them, and it really got me thinking about something other than gear for a change :smile:
     
  23. Thomas Bertilsson

    Thomas Bertilsson Subscriber

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    I like my old Summitar lens a heck of a lot for portraits. With a 25mm aperture the depth of field is perfect, and that lens really shines. Then I put it on a tripod and shoot Kodak TMax 100 or Fuji Acros, and do landscapes with it. It's amazing to see medium size prints (16x20) made with this lens stopped down to f/5.6 or f/8.
    Then I sometimes use my Hasselblad, which has lenses that display a fair bit more contrast, so I have to give more exposure to open up the shadows, and process with much reduced agitation in order to get a similar tonality from it.

    I guess my contribution to the 'discovery' theme is that I find 35mm perfectly adequate for landscape, and while I have always felt this to be true, I'm still stunned every time I see a 16x20 come up from a tiny, but well exposed and processed 35mm negative. It's even cropped a little bit in its aspect ratio, in order to yield a 1" border around periphery of the paper sheet. And the lesson I keep learning, over and over again, is that often times it's a good idea to at least challenge 'conventional wisdom' and go see for yourself.