Your thoughts and info on Ektalure

Discussion in 'B&W: Film, Paper, Chemistry' started by Elox, Aug 14, 2005.

  1. Elox

    Elox Member

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Location:
    Central Texa
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    I received several boxes of Kodak Ektalure 8x10 paper, about a year ago, when I purchased some other darkroom items. I just tried it out tonight and I wasn't expecting it to be good, but it seems to be OK. What little bit I have found states that this is a single contrast paper. My questions are:

    1. The contrast grade is about 2?

    2. I would assume this is primarily designed for printing studio portraits with fairly controlled lighting?

    3. What do you like/dislike about this paper?

    4. Stored under refrigeration, how much longer would you expect this paper to last?

    Thanks.
     
  2. David A. Goldfarb

    David A. Goldfarb Moderator Staff Member Moderator

    Messages:
    17,978
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2002
    Location:
    Honolulu, Ha
    Shooter:
    Large Format
    Ektalure was an outstanding paper that produced rich blacks and had a nice texture. Consider yourself fortunate to have some. I believe it was discontinued when Kodak stopped using cadmium in their papers due to environmental regulations.
     
  3. George Papantoniou

    George Papantoniou Member

    Messages:
    992
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Location:
    Athens
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    1. yes. In Dektol, a bit higher, in Selectol-soft a bit lower.

    2. yes. But can do other tricks, too.

    3. Great tonality. Great highlight contrast. Smooth gradation. Superb handling in developer. Very flexible. Reacts well to toning. Charming surface and off-white base. Thick paper base.

    4. My only guess can be that since it has made it up to now, it will make it for a while longer...

    Congratulations for your luck having it, I must say that I envy you...
     
  4. Elox

    Elox Member

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Location:
    Central Texa
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Maybe I should start auctioning off single sheets..... :smile: But it has gone to the fridge for more careful storage. I really like the look of the final print.

    Actually, I never expected it to be good so I did a quick & dirty print from a fairly high contrast 35mm negative (The neg is really just a snapshot that I had never printed). I was very suprised how well the Ektalure handled the contrast.
     
  5. Monophoto

    Monophoto Member

    Messages:
    1,691
    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2004
    Location:
    Saratoga Spr
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    One additional comment on the qualities of the late, lamented Ektalure - - - in its naked form, it had a slight greenish cast. But when toned in highly dilute selenium, it produced some wonderful warmish neutral tones.
     
  6. Ronald Moravec

    Ronald Moravec Member

    Messages:
    1,263
    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Location:
    Downers Grov
    Repackage in smaller quantities, squeese out the air. seal well, and freeze it. Take out small quantities as you need it.

    Contrast can be varied by starting in selectol soft and finishing varying amounts of time in Dektol.
     
  7. fparnold

    fparnold Member

    Messages:
    264
    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2002
    Location:
    Binghamton,
    Shooter:
    Multi Format
    No productive suggestions on use, but it was a lovely paper. I only had it in the G surface, and did some extremely nice environmental portraits on it. It had a warm faintly greenish color when untoned, which when combined with the cream base, is very pleasing. I'lll admit that I had to look at a print under bright daylight to agree with green, as I just thought of it as an organic black, over a very pleasing cream base.

    One of the few cases where to prefer the Kodak over the Agfa product. Ektalure was gently warm, whereas Portriga was brown.

    Finally, maybe you should consider selling it in single sheets. It was truly a loss when it was discontinued.
     
  8. Elox

    Elox Member

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Location:
    Central Texa
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    OK, where would I find more info on this? Any starting recommendations?

    Also, I'm attaching a quick scan og the print I did. Film was APX100, exposed in Canon GIII QL17 (vacation snaps) on Auto exposure. Handheld exposure, holding the camera above the fop that was in front of me at the Texas RenFair and it was a typical bright day. Print is about a 14x enlargement of the central portion, printed on the Ektalure and processed in generic Dektol (don't ask). The actual print looks a bit more cream and less green than the scan.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. George Papantoniou

    George Papantoniou Member

    Messages:
    992
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2005
    Location:
    Athens
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    Is it really so yellow ??? It looks like a toned print to me... My Ektalure prints have never been so yellow !

    This is a toned (light selenium) print, so it is not green at all. But you can see that the paper base is just light cream, not yellow.

    Made on 8x10 APX, contact printed on Ektalure G surface in Selectol Soft, then Dektol and finally Kodak Rapid Selenium 1+20.
     

    Attached Files:

  10. Elox

    Elox Member

    Messages:
    90
    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2003
    Location:
    Central Texa
    Shooter:
    Medium Format
    No. For some reason, my scanner doesn't scan this paper well. It wants to make either too blue, yellow, or green.