Zeiss 531/2 help please

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by Lyrrad, Nov 5, 2005.

  1. Lyrrad

    Lyrrad Member

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    Hi

    I have just managed to purchase the above folder.

    At the back on the door are the 2 windows for viewing film number. The right hand one seems to be for 6 x 9 and the left hand one seems to indicate 4.5 x 6.

    My question, bearing in mind mine actually came with the mask plate, how do i go about knowing when to stop winding.

    I have guessed that perhaps when using 6x9 format i just use right hand window and stop when number 1 appears, shoot, then wind to number 2 etc. With the mask inserted in the camera do I wind until 1 appears in the right hand window, shoot, then wind until 1 appears in the left hand window, shoot and then wind until 2 appears in the right hand window, and continue in this manner.

    This seems the only logical way to me, but i'll most probably get shot down in flames with something that will be obvious.


    Regards



    Darryl
     
  2. medform-norm

    medform-norm Member

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    Darryl,

    I see an opportunity for a learning curve here! Get an old/outdated 120 film and unroll it. (If none available, get a cheap new one and note down the money as learning investment). Look at the paper-backed side of the film. Look at the different numbers marked on it in different places. Roll up the film again and put it in the camera. Wind the film through the camera as if you were making exposures. Once with the mask, once without the mask. Notice what happens in the different windows.

    Without giving away the winning clue, I imagine you will find out how this works quite quickly. And finding out things for yourself is more fun than having someone trying to explain things to you.

    Good luck!
    Norm
     
  3. laz

    laz Member

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    I have a Zeiss 531/2 and had the same question when I got it. What Norm suggests will reveal all!

    -Bob (no clue from me)
     
  4. Konical

    Konical Subscriber

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    Good Morning, Darryl,

    Since you'll be using the red window approach, the simple procedure suggested by Norm actually requires only the backing paper from a roll of 120 you've already shot; there's no need to sacrifice a fresh roll of film.

    Konical
     
  5. medform-norm

    medform-norm Member

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    I second that! Good tip from Konical. Otherwise: we'll be here waiting for your results :smile:
     
  6. Lyrrad

    Lyrrad Member

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    Okay. now I know

    Many thanks
     
  7. medform-norm

    medform-norm Member

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    and....did you have fun?
     
  8. Lyrrad

    Lyrrad Member

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    Learning is ALWAYS fun.

    Next question.

    With or without film in the camera the following is possible:

    When using the winder the red window (near the winder) informs me of unexposed frame. All is well if i cock the shutter and press shutter release. The indicator goes from red to white.

    However, if I forget to cock the shutter, and press the shutter release button (not a featherlight touch, but as if I was about to take a photograph) the action of pressing the release button causes the red window to change to white. Now when I cock the shutter I am unable to press the shutter release button for obviuos reasons.


    My question is:

    Is this faulty, or is this just the way it is with this camera.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 6, 2005
  9. elekm

    elekm Member

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    That's just how it is. However, all is not lost. You can always trip the shutter, using the small flap that is near the lens/shutter assembly.

    This is useful for intentional double exposures or those times when you press the shutter release but forgot to tension the shutter, which you describe above.

    These are really amazing cameras. I've serviced several, and once they've been tuned up, they can produce results that can be simply stunning. Congratulations on owning a true classic.
     
  10. Marco Gilardetti

    Marco Gilardetti Member

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    No, it's faulty. The shutter release button should be LOCKED when the shutter is not cocked, and what you describe should happen only by pushing the button with an outstanding pressure of the finger (= almost breaking the device). Your unit probably gained gear tolerances over time. No need to fix it, though, if you are aware of the problem and use it accordingly.

    The two windows system for 4,5x6 was conceived since 120 rolls didn't have the specific 1-16 numbers sequence for 4,5x6 format at the time, so it was thought to "recycle" the 6x9 sequence with the second window. A good trick!

    The fact that you have the reducing mask yelds to the hypothesis that your unit is equipped with a Tessar lens. Which aperture? And on which shutter? I'm particularly fond of this specific model, so I'm always happy when I meet someone who's still using it. :smile:
     
  11. Lyrrad

    Lyrrad Member

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    Marco

    It's a Tessar 4.5 uncoated with Compur shutter 1/250. Condition is excellent and I believe it is pre-second world war.

    I have been informed that this kind of uncoated lens still produces outstanding results. Perhaps you could add your opinions.


    Regards


    Darryl
     
  12. Marco Gilardetti

    Marco Gilardetti Member

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    I've never had the Tessar 4.5 so far, only Tessars 3.5 and Novar Anastigmats. The 4.5 "is said" to be less good than the 3.5, and this means, since all "said" things are 99.9% of the times just rubbish, that it is instead probably even better. Talking on an illimited money fund scenario, I'd buy one just to confute the "less good" hypothesis.

    It is likely, but when production re-started after WWII, many units were made with a mix & match of pre-world war leftovers, so who really knows.

    I totally agree. Generally speaking, I find that photographs made with these Tessars are as sharp as promised by the famous name they bear. Same thing happens, however, with the less sought-after Novar Anastigmat models, which thus are a cheap and smart choice. Both lenses are usually affected by a general flare to which today photographers are totally unaccustomed. Not a "natural flou" effect, but a general glow which surronds wide areas of highlights and reduces midtones' contrast accordingly. You can either consider it a defect, or better a valuable feature that will add a "vintage" touch to your images.

    However, the best photograph I have ever taken to my girlfriend so far has been made with a camera which is almost identical to yours. Enjoy it!
     
  13. elekm

    elekm Member

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    Here's a short write-up I did a few months back on the earlier model 530/2.

    There often were several variations within each model. The first was the Super Ikonta 530/2 with plunger style shutter release followed by the 530/2 with body release. The 531/2 introduced double-exposure prevention.

    The camera returned after World War war. Zeiss Ikon also produced the uncoupled rangefinder model 524/2 -- a sibling to the Mess Ikonta 6x6 524/16. The 524/2 was 6x9 only. Both cameras are similar in their styling to the folding Contina, which was designed by the legendary Hubert Nerwin.
     
  14. Marco Gilardetti

    Marco Gilardetti Member

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    Mike, I don't get it. The one I see in your picture is the archetype of all Albada-type finders...