Zeiss Ikon Nettax Gummed Shutter

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by CliveC, Jan 27, 2013.

  1. CliveC

    CliveC Member

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    I just picked up a VERY clean Zeiss Ikon Nettar (518/16) with one problem, the shutter won't fire.

    I can cock the shutter, hit the shutter release, see the linkage move, but the actual shutter sticks. The shutter can be made to manually open and close by actuating the shutter winder lever. It takes quite a bit of effort though and the shutter moves slowly.

    The couple of the shutter blades seem dirty (slightly darker in colour), leading me to believe it may be the cause.

    Does servicing the shutter require the complete disassembly of the lens or can the just the front element be removed while the blades are cleaned with Ronsonol/Lighter fluid and a Q-Tip?

    A professional servicing would probably not be cost effective for this camera. I'm fine having the camera as a display piece, but it seems like such a waste.
     
  2. Jojje

    Jojje Member

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  3. CliveC

    CliveC Member

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    Darn, it looks like a little more than what I can deal with (plus it looks like some special tools involved). I haven't the best track record for putting stuff back together after I take things apart.

    Also, I just noticed I bungled my thread title: Nettar, not Nettax. :confused:
     
  4. Whiteymorange

    Whiteymorange Member

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    Try the quick and dirty route of flooding it with naptha (Rosignol Lighter fluid), biut only after removing both front and back elements and determining whether or not your shutter has metal blades (some old shutters had paper aperture blades). There are plenty of folks here who can answer that issue for you if you tell us what the shutter is, but I'm not one of them. You can also try a hair drier to gently heat the shutter while exercising it. Sometimes this loosens up the grunge enough to get the thing working for awhile.

    Disclaimer: This NOT a substitute for getting your shutter professionally CLA'd! If the lens is worth keeping, it is worth having cleaned. The naptha treatment might give you a short window of useable time (your results may be very different from my own) during which you can take test shots and determine whether the whole thing is worth the money. CLA's are not terribly expensive, but they aren't cheap, either.
     
  5. CliveC

    CliveC Member

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    Thanks for the insight. Having seen the process outlined in the link above, I am only confident enough to remove the front piece. From the back of the camera, I can see discolouration also, which may indicate oil. I'm relatively certain it's a metal bladed shutter.

    I think I will hang on to the camera as is for the moment until I find somebody local who can help with the repair at an affordable rate. I'm still learning, gaining connections.