Zeiss Super Ikonta film advance question

Discussion in 'Rangefinder Forum' started by Barry S, Jun 22, 2010.

  1. Barry S

    Barry S Subscriber

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    I went to a small camera show a few weeks ago and somehow came home with a Zeiss Super Ikonta BX (533/16). :smile: It's a beautiful machine and the meter still works, but the film advance mechanism has some issues.

    Can someone please tell me the purpose of the small button to the left of the film advance knob? It doesn't seem to do anything on my camera. It would help if someone explained the exact sequence of actions used for advancing a new roll, winding between frames, and resetting.

    I have an issue with the frame counter not advancing and the film not smoothly advancing. I disassembled the film advance knob and frame counter ring and it looks like someone incorrectly assembled the mechanism although I can't tell exactly how it's supposed to fit together. Does anyone have an exploded view or detailed instructions on how the assembly fit together. Thanks.
     
  2. Barry S

    Barry S Subscriber

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    So, nobody has one of these pups? The Ikonta BX--Queen of Folders. Guess I'll start working my way through the permutations of assembling the advance mechanism.
     
  3. Jeff L

    Jeff L Subscriber

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    Load the film. Wind on until the arrows line up with the white marks inside the back, close back, move little knob toward meter housing (this engages the counter and stops the winder at the proper place on film) once little knob is moved toward meter housing you can wind on and it should stop at frame 1. Shoot the roll and when you've shot frame twelve keep winding. You only have to set the little knob at the start of each roll. This should do it provided all is fine with your camera. If you google Super Ikonta 533 manual you will find scans of the manual online.
     
  4. Barry S

    Barry S Subscriber

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  5. fotch

    fotch Member

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    Well, I have one and everything works like new. However, I don't know the answer to your question. When I can look at mine, maybe I can help, just don't have the time right now.

    Good Luck.
     
  6. Two23

    Two23 Member

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    I've been looking at buying an older Zeiss folder (at least 50 years old) and have come across posts saying that some of these have problems with film advance. They attribute it to the paper backing of that time period being thicker than it is now. The Zeiss Ikonta C III or IV seems to be the camera most mentioned.


    Kent in SD
     
  7. Jeff L

    Jeff L Subscriber

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    I have no really bad frame spacing issues on my ZI folders. I have a 533/16, a 521 from the early 30's and a Cocarette for the late 20's. Frame spacing may not be exact between every shot, but if they're not overlapping then it's fine for me. Old camera frame spacing and lenses that haven't been designed by a super computer are all part of their charm. IMO
     
  8. Barry S

    Barry S Subscriber

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    Kent--Based on examination of my Super Ikonta, the paper backing story doesn't sound probable--but maybe other models are different. I think my problems are more due to the complex design of the film advance mechanism. The BX has both a red window and a frame locking system, so the camera straddles the time when cameras started converting to more sophisticated film advance mechanisms. The early design seems overly complex and more prone to failure, but it's a minor quibble compared with the beauty and craftsmanship of the Ikontas.
     
  9. elekm

    elekm Member

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    The Super Ikonta A (6x4.5) and C (6x9) never had auto framing -- they always used a red window. Only the Super Ikonta B (6x6) had auto framing.

    The 531/16 and the 532/16 used a hand-cut brass disk to position each frame. While I've had some frames close together, I haven't had any overlap ... yet.

    The red windows on the Super Ikonta B (531/16, 532/16 and 533/16) is for positioning the first frame, and then the camera's auto positioning system takes over for the rest of the shots.