Zero Image 4x5

Discussion in 'Pinhole Photography' started by Atlo, May 11, 2009.

  1. Atlo

    Atlo Member

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    i am looking to buy this camera but i have a few very stupid questions.

    what are your general thoughts on this camera and how it works?

    second, relating to the focal length, do you have a favorite? and are the numbers they give you on the site the 35mm equivalent or do they honestly have a 4x5 camera with a 25mm focal length?
     
  2. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

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    I love their cameras!

    Own two 4x5 models; a 35 mm; 2 6x6 cameras; 6x9; and their 6x12 model. What's not to like.

    But to be honest, get the three sections, I rarely use the 25 mm focal length.

    Here's an image I made with only the 25 mm section: http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Cheers/Portfolios/Pages/Washington_DC.html#11

    This was made with all three sections: http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Cheers/Portfolios/Pages/Washington_DC.html#10

    This too with 3 sections: http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Cheers/Portfolios/Pages/Washington_DC.html#2

    This on their 6x6 camera: http://www.walterpcalahan.com/Cheers/Portfolios/Pages/Washington_DC.html#4

    All the other images in this gallery were made on other pinhole cameras. All shot on Fuji Provia 100F.
     
  3. Atlo

    Atlo Member

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    thanks a bundle.
    i guess i'm gonna save up my cash till i can afford the 3 sectioned one.
     
  4. Atlo

    Atlo Member

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    oh, i actually have one more question about them. is there a way to put filters on the 4x5 system?
     
  5. nsurit

    nsurit Subscriber

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    I also have the 4X5 model and the 6X9. I've not successfully used a filter although I did attempt to tape a gel behind the pinhole. Didn't work too well with my limited test. If you order from Hong Kong you will be surprised how quickly it gets here. Order the three sections at the same time. Bill Barber
     
  6. walter23

    walter23 Subscriber

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    Pinhole cameras are dead simple to make. I got a Fonseca cigar box and made one that takes 4x5 holders (held in place with a rubber band). Just took a bit of work with an exacto knife to cut out notches for the film holder on the back, and some black felt glued in place as light trap material. I bought a pre-made precision pinhole set from ebay for about $30 and used the one closest to the ideal pinhole size for my focal length & film size (there are calculators online). You can make your own pinholes too, there are lots of methods that yield good results (eg. denting a piece of popcan with a needle and then sanding away a bit to get a round hole, etc).

    Works really well. Can't find a handy image, but you'll have to trust me that the image quality is excellent.
     
  7. Ross Chambers

    Ross Chambers Member

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    I find the 25mm (basic body with shutter) to be just too wide for most shots, except occasionally

    75mm (basic body plus 3 sections) looked to me a little like a view camera shot with a very poor lens.

    50mm (basic body plus 1 section) was the sweet spot for me.

    It's up to your taste.

    The optional/additional spirit level is a handy aid to help estimate the likely field that you are pointing at, as is a home-made 4x5" cutout.

    And don't forget to carry a few boxes of rubber bands! They have a way of snapping at inconvenient times.

    Regards - Ross
     
  8. Marco B

    Marco B Member

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    I have the three section 4x5 version. They are wonderful cameras with a high quality pinhole. This means you will get surprisingly sharp pinhole photos.

    The 25 mm version can be a challenge, but like any focal length, you have to learn to use it and the results can be quite spectular... Here are a few photo's made with the 25 mm section alone. The nightshots took me up to 45 min exposure time, depending on the light situation, and that was using the low reciprocity failure TMax400! :surprised:.

    WWII monument on Dam Square in Amsterdam:
    [​IMG]

    AJAX soccer stadium in Amsterdam:
    [​IMG]

    And here's a daytime shot: Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, where they house Rembrandt's "Nightwatch":

    [​IMG]

    More photos here, all taken with just the 25 mm section:
    http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/amsterdam_by_day/index_amsterdam_by_day.html
    http://www.boeringa.demon.nl/amsterdam_by_night/index_amsterdam_by_night.html

    Marco
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 12, 2009
  9. Pinholemaster

    Pinholemaster Member

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    I have never used a filter on a pinhole camera. Taping one to the inside of the box would be the simplest method.
     
  10. nsurit

    nsurit Subscriber

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    Marco, wonderful images! Makes me wonder why mine remains in the boxes so often. Thanks for the inspiration. <{B^) Bill Barber
     
  11. Silverhead

    Silverhead Member

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    The fact that Zero Image's cameras are so aesthetically attractive on top of taking wonderful images is another plus, IMHO. It's such a lovely little box to look at, with all that great wood and brass...it looks equally pleasing displayed on a shelf as it is in the field.