ZeroImage pinhole camera advice?

Discussion in 'Pinhole Photography' started by chihiro, Jan 9, 2012.

  1. chihiro

    chihiro Member

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    hello,

    i would like to ask you for an advice about the Zero pinhole cameras:

    i have never used before a pinhole camera but would like to as for an advice which would you recomend me for landscape fotography when i travel to take with me.

    I usually do mid format b/w photography.

    which of these will you recomend ,and what do you think is the main diffrence:

    Zero 6x9 Multi Format"

    Zero 2000

    Zero 612B Multi-Format


    Thank you
     
  2. grahamp

    grahamp Subscriber

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    None of them weigh very much. I consider 6x12 a specialized format, and not one I can enlarge, so I chose a 6x9 and normally leave it in 6x9 format. 8 on 120 makes a decent compromise between wide angle and film economy. Pick your format, and how wide you want to go, and use the camera to suit.

    Graham
     
  3. chihiro

    chihiro Member

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    sorry what is 8?

    are there any other dicent pinhole cameras that you can recomend please?

    thank you
     
  4. SMBooth

    SMBooth Member

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    8 images on a 120 roll if using the 6x9 format.
    Zero image camera are great, i would get the 6x9, as you can adjust for 6x6, 6x7 & 6x4.5. The 2000 has a focal length of 25mm which IMO is to wide unless its your 2nd camera, the 6x9 is 40mm which again to me is a lot nicer.

    Other nice 120 pinhole by Tony Taylor http://www.pinholephotography.co.uk/pages/index.htm
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 9, 2012
  5. daleeman

    daleeman Subscriber

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    I have one of the 6x12 multi formats with the pressure plates, level, tripod sockets and such. I had it customized with my name too. I really like it, it is light and easy to use, the cable release device on it makes a difference.

    Sine you have to make a format choice when you load film I often load the film to the idea I have in mind, but I still shoot most of work in 6x6 or 6x9.

    The Zero Image is not cheap, but build nice and is a great ambasidor for attracting people to shooting film.

    Lee
     
  6. Poisson Du Jour

    Poisson Du Jour Member

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    Hands down, the Zero Image 6x9 multiformat. Apart from being a work of exquisite art and detail, it's wonderfully simple to set up: just take out the dividers, reposition to the format you desire, load up and shoot! And it's a conversation starter. Oh, and leave the digi or 35mm at home for bushwalking. Pack a lightmeter and the ZI multi-format and bring back some little chestnuts. Love it. :smile:
     
  7. summicron1

    summicron1 Subscriber

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    my first zero image was the 6 by 6, and I've loved it ever since -- very basic, does lovely work. I got crazy and bought the 35mm one and it's not as sharp because it uses the same pinhole and film distance as the 6 by 6 one-- interestingly, using 400 film in it I've even, by bracing the camera slightly and using the cable adaptor, managed to do occasional handheld with it and done OK.

    I recently got wild and crazy and bought their 4 by 5 -- the 75b system. It's lovely, and opens new vistas and is even slightly cheaper than the Ilford Titan and has 3 separate distances, with three pinholes so you're always shooting in the f-138 region, and it has zone plates I'm anxious to try out.

    So I'd say, for a beginner, the Zero 2000 in 6 by 6 would be your best bet. That and a small tripod and some 100 film so you don't have to try to time short exposures outdoors, you're on your way. If you go through the galleries at the Zero Image web site you will see many, many wonderful shots taken with that camera.