zi nettar question

Discussion in 'Medium Format Cameras and Accessories' started by photographertrainee, Jul 15, 2006.

  1. photographertrainee

    photographertrainee Member

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    okay people...i really need some help here. i have a zeiss ikon nettar 515/2 in mint condition. it belonged to my grandfather and he kept EVERYTHING he owned in mint conditon.

    i have the viewfinder and camera opened, but i don't know where to go from there. any help would be very appreciated.

    i was very excited to find out that i could purchase film for this camera. and i'm excited to figure out how it works. i don't know a lot about photography, so give me the idiot's guide, please. :smile:
     
  2. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    Uhm... let me see what I can do. It's easier to do than explain in words. :smile: This is a camera for 120 roll film and if I understand it correctly it has a lens which on the front says something to effect of "105 mm". So, in that case it makes photos with a size of 6x9 cm.

    It's pretty basic, you have a latch on the left or right side of the camera, which opens the back. Now you need a roll of film and you also need an empty spool. On the bottom of the camera you have a winding key. Put the empty spool on that side. On the other side you put the new roll. Open the new rollfilm, thread it across, over to the empty spool. Wind on the roll film (with the winding key) until you can see a marker that says "start" or two big arrows on each side of the film. There should be a small red dot somewhere in the back of the camera which is where the start or arrow markers should be. When that's done, close the back.

    On the back there's either a little red window or a little door which you can push aside to see a red window. It's used for winding the film into the right place and to get it ready for a new photograph to be taken. In the window you'll see numbers (1,2,3, etc). These are the frame numbers of each possible photograph that you can make on the roll. Wind it on to see number 1 in the window, click the shutter, and then wind on to number 2 and so on.

    This also means you have to remember when you took a photo and wind on to a new frame, otherwise you get what is called a double exposure. I'd say that you need to test it out from from here. Sacrifice a roll of film to learn how to load and use the camera. Get back with questions and I or someone else will help you out.

    Hope this helps a bit,
    J
     
  3. eubielicious

    eubielicious Member

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    I had one of these for a while. It is simple and basic as others have said, and produces 6x9 negatives which was no good in my case as at the time I had an enlarger which would only do to 6x6, so I wound up giving it away. There's a red window you use to wind the film on, but the best bit is that they fold up to back-pocket size, which is great. I also really like the little mini-waist-level-finder which should be attached to the lens, you can twist it so you can view in landscape or portrait format.

    Have fun with it!

    Euan
     
  4. photographertrainee

    photographertrainee Member

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    Thanks for the help...but my main issue right now is getting the back opened. If I had my digital camera right now, I'd take a pic of it. I'll try to describe it. On the side of the viewfinder there are two knobs that don't move (they look like they are holding the two parts of the back together.) The other side has the winding key and an opened hole where you can see through to metal.

    I hope this helps.
     
  5. kb244

    kb244 Member

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    If its anything like my Zeiss Ikon Nettar 515 (the 6x4.5 smaller version) , theres a lil latch/knob up on the top that you pull to the left and it snaps open the back. Same when you close it and push the latch to the right til its locked in.

    Basically you put the film in the bottom, pull up some of the leader into the empty spool in the top wind it a lil bit til you see the arrows on the bottom. Close up, and wind until you see (1) in the window.

    Set your shutter speeds and aperture on the front. Figure the focusing distance and set on the front. Cock the shutter, look thru your viewfinder to compose the shot ( or shoot from the hip ), Fire the shutter, wind the film til the next number shows in the window, and repeat the above. When you've shot the last frame, continue to wind the roll until its all rolled up on the top, take the top spool out and seal as instructed, and move the used spool on the bottom to the top to serve as the new take up spool.

    Its really not that hard.

    By the way the knobs on the viewfinder side dont hold the back , they are just the peice of metal that holds the spools in. Theres a latch on the top of the camera somewhere as I said.
     
  6. elekm

    elekm Member

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  7. titrisol

    titrisol Member

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    Google is your friend.... run a search and there is a couple of manuals available on line
    IIRC David Richert website has one.
     
  8. battra92

    battra92 Member

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    Ahh, a great camera! As some stated, it shouldn't be too hard to figure out. Have you ever used MF before?
     
  9. HeliH

    HeliH Member

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    I just bought a Zeiss Ikon Nettar. It looks like brand new, it's so beautiful, looks like it's never been used. My question is where I could check the year it is manufactured?
     
  10. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 3, 2006
  11. Mike Kovacs

    Mike Kovacs Member

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    Heli, what is the serial number on the camera? It should be a letter followed by numbers, perhaps embossed in the leather.

    If there is a Zeiss lens, the serial is also useful, though most Nettars came with numberless Novars.

    Which 120 format is your Nettar? I think they were made in 6x4.5, 6x6, and finally 6x9 as the original poster's.

    Nettars are OK, but Ikonta's are a step above in terms of quality. Super Ikonta's add a coupled rangefinder at the cost of much size and weight.
     
  12. HeliH

    HeliH Member

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    The serial number is K 41095. Novar as a lens. It's 6x6. I'm going to put this beauty into my vitrine :smile:. Of course going to test it first.
     
  13. Mike Kovacs

    Mike Kovacs Member

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    The letters flipped over once - its either about 1938 or about 1956. It should be pretty easy for you to see whether its a prewar camera (uncoated lens, no chrome) vs postwar (coated lens, chrome top).
     
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  15. Jerevan

    Jerevan Subscriber

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    Are the letters going from A-Z, and then starts over again at some point in time? I could never figure out how it really works and the information is pretty limited and confusing too.
     
  16. HeliH

    HeliH Member

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    Ok. Then it's 1956 because of chrome top. Thanks, Mike!
     
  17. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

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    It should have 517/16 or 518/16 embossed into the leather too. Be prepared to be amazed. Stop down into the f11 range set your approximate distance, meter and set the speed, then shoot away. Those triplets take wonderfully contrasty photos. My 518 is my everyday carry around camera. It replaced the FM2.

    tim in san jose
     
  18. HeliH

    HeliH Member

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    In the Leather says only Zeiss Ikon, but in the body, I finally found it, is 518/16. What do those numbers mean? And I can't stop wondering the really beautiful condition of this, it really looks that this has never been used. It looks like brand new.
     
  19. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Try looking very carefully at the back of the camera, on one edge it's stamped with the model no as well. Camera Serial no is the other end.

    The Nettar 516 takes 6x4.5 images on 120 roll film

    Ian
     
  20. Mike Kovacs

    Mike Kovacs Member

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    51x are the Nettar model numbers (52x Ikonta, 53x Super Ikonta)

    No / = 6x4.5
    /16 = 6x6
    /2 = 6x9
     
  21. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Thanks Mike

    My mistake it's so difficult to read the Model & no, close inspection and my camera is an Ikonta 521, which is 6x4.5

    Ian
     
  22. Mike Kovacs

    Mike Kovacs Member

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    Ikonta 521 is a nice camera. Tiny, isn't it when you consider its medium format?

    The difference between 520 and 521 is addition of double exposure prevention. I have a 521/16 (6x6) sitting in my repair box that needs some shutter service. Its a nice one with an Opton Tessar 75/3.5. Its quite a bit bigger though than the 521.
     
  23. k_jupiter

    k_jupiter Member

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    518/16 means you have a signal nettar. There is a hole in the top plate that tells you if you have advanced the film after your last shot. 517/16 means you have to guess or just double expose.

    and a "/18"?

    *L*

    tim in an jose (owner of a 127 Nettar)
     
  24. Mike Kovacs

    Mike Kovacs Member

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    There are more "slash numbers" too for many obsolete formats - my McKeowns is packed at the moment though.
     
  25. Ian Grant

    Ian Grant Subscriber

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    Mike you pose an interesting question or rather point.

    I've used 6x6 then later (1984 onwardrs) the 6x4.5 format and thought of them as medium format.

    But then using AP25 and APX25 in a 6x9 back on my 5x4 I've thought of them as large format.

    The 645 format is good but hasn't the quality of 6x9 or larger, and that's the quality I'm after all the time for my landscape work.

    Having said that 6x4.5 is excellent for my commercial work, just haven't tried the Ikonta yet, but the lens is very clean and the shutter works perfectly I think it has APX100 loaded :smile:

    Ian

     
  26. Mike Kovacs

    Mike Kovacs Member

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    6x9 is not without issues though - film flatness can be a real problem, exasperated on folding cameras because unfolding the lens sucks the film out from the pressure plate.

    I bet I can make a sharper print from an excellent 6x6 of 6x4.5 camera like a Hassy or Rolleiflex than most 6x9 cameras.