Zonemaster For Lots of Small Prints, Workflow

Discussion in 'Enlarging' started by thedancefloor, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. thedancefloor

    thedancefloor Member

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    Could you help me on my workflow?

    I have a project coming up where I need to make a series (100 or so) of small prints on FB paper, 3"x3" from 120 negs, and 2x3 from 35mm negs.

    And I have limited time to make the prints. What would be the fastest way to do this?

    Here's my plan so far:
    The paper is cut into the 3" squares already, and my zonemaster is calibrated to my paper. My next step would be to work on a correction factor and height that I could interpolate from. I've been working on measuring the negative at a height of say 20" and then finding the factor, but I haven't had much success yet. The scale on my enlarger (Kienzle autofocus) doesn't make much sense to me yet. I think it might actually be in stops already, but it's hard to get an accurate measurement off the baseboard at the smallest print sizes. The height of my meter and zonemaster probe might throw it off a bit.

    I'm going to try to use http://www.darkroomautomation.com/support/stopsruler.pdf for my factors.

    Then I'll make 1-3 prints of each negative and record it, let them dry, and repeat.

    Have you got any tips on using the ZM for this sort of thing, or my workflow?

    Thanks!!!

    Dallas
     
  2. SteveR

    SteveR Member

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    I don't have an answer for you, just wanted to say that I'll be watching this thread with interest. I've just about given up on my Zonemaster, been trying to calibrate it after standardizing on a new paper (old stock almost run out, and it's not made anymore), I can't get it dialed in and I'm about to piff it... So I'll be watching with interest.
     
  3. Rick A

    Rick A Subscriber

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    Use a longer than normal enlarging lens to get the enlarger head up and away from the easel. Then take your readings. Use an 80mm for 135 film and a 135-150mm for the 120 film. It's all about giving yourself room to move with such small print sizes.
     
  4. ath

    ath Member

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    What do you need that correction factor for? Are you planning to measure with the zonemaster at a bigger magnification and transfer it to a smaller print?
    Probably the easiest and fastest (and expensive) way is to use a Heiland Splitgrade system. Small print = small details will face challenges to the system but AFAIK the Heiland has a smaller probe aperture than the Zonemaster.
     
  5. thedancefloor

    thedancefloor Member

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    Thanks Steve, I think I've got mine calibrated. I'm having a bit of trouble too. And it's not a quick process! I suspect that there's a typo in the calibration manual, maybe add one stop should be - and minus one stop should be +.

    Rick, so the higher the better? Sounds right.

    Ath, yes, I'm trying to measure the highlights and blacks at a height that is 2 or maybe 3 stops larger than the small size.
     
  6. ath

    ath Member

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    Think of it this way: when you change the magnification you distribute the light over a different area. Double the area = double the time to get the same light per area.
    Just work with the longer side of the print as scale - doubling means 4 times the area - open up 2 stops.
    Esp. for small magnifications this is an approximation but a good starting point.
     
  7. thedancefloor

    thedancefloor Member

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    So last night I tried the darkroom automation yardstick, and took my readings from a height that would equal a 2 stop difference. It worked perfectly.

    What was throwing me off, was these silly height numbers on my fancy German autofocus enlarger. I have no idea what they mean! Certainly not inches or cm. I was trying to use that new height vs. old height equation without success.

    Thanks for the replies. Thanks zonemaster, thanks darkroom automation.
     
  8. Ken N

    Ken N Member

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    This is a perfect application for the Ilford meter. Use the Zonemaster to establish your settings at the height and then when you drop it down, adjust the the aperture to get the same exposure results. It's a nifty trick that comes in handy when you need to make different sized prints of the same image.