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DREW WILEY
02-01-2012, 11:44 AM
A lot has to do with cultural distinctions. Around here no one will buy a really big print. The folks with the huge
incomes locally (and some of the richest people in the world do live here) tend to build elaborate craftsmen style houses with lots of little niches and fancy woodwork, and not big blank walls like in Vegas or Miami. And when they purchase prints they're thinking more along the lines of the West Coast school - collect a Weston, for example. Commercial decor will use moderately big prints, but generally relatively chepo decor. Tricky market. There used to be a local saying, if they can't carry a print under their arm, it won't sell. But I was more
poking fun at the sheer extremes in operation right now. It's like all that digital faux fresco on the ceiling of the Venetian in Vegas (speaking of a disgusting town) - pretty impressive technique, but otherwise just wallpaper
than will get ripped down and replaced within ten years. Same thing with some of these huge wall prints - they're going to fade unevenly due to either the nasty UV display lighting or sunlight, and cost a small fortune
to mount and hang. I have some friends down the street who specialize in ultra-large digital printing techniques,
but they export everything to NYC or Europe.

clayne
02-01-2012, 12:59 PM
Is it just me or does 32$ a sheet for 11x14 sound kind of out of whack? If a 135 roll is around 5-6$, and that's about 8x10 worth of surface area why does 11x14 cost 5 times that, even accounting for scale?

E. von Hoegh
02-01-2012, 01:15 PM
Demand.

Brian C. Miller
02-01-2012, 01:32 PM
Why is 11x14 three times the price of 8x10? Um, competition, supply and demand? I'm sure that it wouldn't be that expensive if Fuji were supplying 11x14.

Of course, a sheet of 8x10 is about twice the price of a roll of 35mm. Is that fair? That's life.

This means that in order to drive down the price of ULF color film, not only must be film popularized, but film in huge and unwieldy formats must be popularized.

E. von Hoegh
02-01-2012, 01:37 PM
Why is 11x14 three times the price of 8x10? Um, competition, supply and demand? I'm sure that it wouldn't be that expensive if Fuji were supplying 11x14.

Of course, a sheet of 8x10 is about twice the price of a roll of 35mm. Is that fair? That's life.

This means that in order to drive down the price of ULF color film, not only must be film popularized, but film in huge and unwieldy formats must be popularized.

Years ago, when sizes up to 11x14 were pretty regularly used, a sheet of 11x14 was about twice the price of 8x10. In other words, the price and area tracked pretty closely from 35mm to 11x14.

DREW WILEY
02-01-2012, 01:56 PM
For one thing, sheet film is on a completely different more expensive base from roll film. Then for something odd like 11x14 the entire cutting and packing sequence has to be stopped and recalibrated. No different than any other kind of material. Just try buying plywood in an odd dimension. Then you've got about zero competition in this category. And ironically, film prices have
been kept artificially low in the US for a long time. And then you've got raw materials, esp petrochemicals, now skyrocketing, so everything depends on the time of mfg.

keithwms
02-01-2012, 05:02 PM
Well 11x14 hp5+ is about $160 for 25 sheets at b&h... I think it's a steal.

DREW WILEY
02-01-2012, 05:38 PM
Probably 99% of ULF film use is black and white. There is probably some 20X24 Polaroid film still in use. I wonder if Kodachrome was ever made in 11X14? I saw some 5X7 Kodachrome images last year, and I was previously unaware of that.

Brian C. Miller
02-01-2012, 11:51 PM
Well, according to Kodak's info on the Colorama, color film (and I'm guessing it was Kodachrome) was used for it in 8x10 and 8x20, so of course they could cut it any way they liked. Official products, though, the only thing I saw was 4x5, decades back.

E. von Hoegh
02-03-2012, 10:22 AM
Well, according to Kodak's info on the Colorama, color film (and I'm guessing it was Kodachrome) was used for it in 8x10 and 8x20, so of course they could cut it any way they liked. Official products, though, the only thing I saw was 4x5, decades back.

At least one Colorama was shot on 35mm.

Brian C. Miller
02-03-2012, 12:00 PM
At least one Colorama was shot on 35mm.

Yes, I read the Colorama history. At the start they used a Deardorff 8x10 with a custom back, then a Deardorff 8x20, then a Linhoff with 120, and finally 35mm. As the film improved, the format shrank.

Therefore, what's the largest that we should be getting from 11x14?
Colorama = 18ft x 60ft (216in x 720in, 5,486mm x 18,288mm)
35mm = 24mm x 36mm

So: 11x14 should give an image of about 178ft x 593ft.