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paul ewins
04-27-2012, 08:37 PM
I am definitely a collector and decided long a go that whatever I collect (and I don't just collect cameras) should have a fairly tightly defined criteria. Within this criteria it is usually my aim to collect everything available, or as much as is economically feasible. If I know that something will just sit on the shelf then I am just as happy with a non-working example. If I have a choice at the time of purchase then I might spend a little more to get a better looking example of something, but if I already own it then I won't "upgrade" to nicer one. If it comes in multiple colours then I will buy all colours but generally draw the line at "collector's editions".
To give you an idea, I collect Pentax 6x7 bodies, lenses and accessories (and generally speaking draw the line at 500mm), Pentax MX and all accessories, the rest of the Pentax M and K series bodies (but not lenses) and Schneider Symmar lenses (but not the newer APO and APO-L lenses). The Pentax M and K bodies have been my bottom feeder moment with a lot of them being sub $20 bodies from KEH's as-is section and if I had to pay the usual price of a working body I probably wouldn't have bothered.

Sirius Glass
04-28-2012, 12:34 PM
I am confused! Which side of the Pentax 6x7 500mm line do you purchase? Less than 500mm or more than 500mm? What happens to the 500mm lens?

paul ewins
04-29-2012, 07:29 AM
No more than 500mm. The 600/4 and 800/4 are big, heavy, expensive and prone to chromatic aberrations. The M* 800/6.7 is much better but even more expensive. The 1000/7 or 1000/8 reflex probably only exists in a display case back at Pentax HQ. The M* 300 and M* 400 also fall into the category of too expensive, but I can live in hope of fluking a bargain one day.

Sirius Glass
04-29-2012, 12:05 PM
Thank you Paul. I was wondering if you were short changing the wide angle lenses. Now I know that you are not.

DrTang
05-09-2012, 02:33 PM
I buy cameras that look cool and that I can afford at the time

they don't have to work..but they must be complete


I typically look for 50's-60's rangefinders..but have been known to stray

Jeff Kubach
05-10-2012, 02:25 PM
I only buy what I need. On occasion I get free stuff.

Jeff

Peltigera
07-17-2012, 08:34 AM
I only collect cameras that work and that I can use. Most of them are Voigtlanders and Zeiss Ikons but not entirely. The most I have paid so far is 25.00 and for that I have obtained some excellent cameras.

My only criterion (apart from usability) is that they must be well made. The only cheap and nasty I have is my Kodak Brownie Vecta that I was given when I was 12.

PDH
07-18-2012, 01:09 PM
I have attempted to be a collector, started with Miranda then got bored with collecting. On the up side I have a very usable collection of EEs with the exception of the 180mm all of the prime lens for the EE which I do use often. Last year I bought a Canon T90 and a few fews, but just sold the kit as I just did not use often enough.

Thomas Bertilsson
07-18-2012, 01:26 PM
I don't plan on buying another camera for a long time. My approach is very pragmatic, and I only feel like I need to have one camera.
My Hasselblad 500 and three lenses was a birthday gift from my parents. How lucky is that? I don't feel like I need that camera, but it sure is nice to have, and it is such a joy to use. I could probably stand getting another body for it, and a back-up couple of lenses, but I'm very happy with what I've got.
The Leica M2 was offered to me a couple of years ago at a price I could not turn down. I can't fault that camera, and in addition to the Hasselblad it's hard to find a reason to actually need another camera. One stellar 6x6 and one stellar 35mm.

So, why I have kept my 35mm Pentax gear, containing a couple of KX bodies, six lenses, a Spotmatic with a 58mm Helios, a ZeroImage 2000 pinhole, a 5x7 Century, and a Rollei 35SE I have no idea. But I guess it's fun to shoot macro with the Pentax, the Spotmatic is just a cool camera, the little Rollei is a superb little pocket sized camera, and pinhole and 5x7 is entertaining and used to shake it up a little.

I guess my criteria for buying another camera would be that it would have to fill a function my existing cameras can't. I can't see what that would possibly be, but perhaps some day I'd get really interested in interior architecture, for example, needing a 4x5 with crazy movements. That sort of thing.

cliveh
07-18-2012, 01:52 PM
I have about 10 cameras, but it is only when I take the M2 out do I feel I have to do some serious work. I never have time to use all the others and often think about selling one or two. However, when I pick them up and enjoy the tactile sensation of their mechanics and admire their individual design, I just put them away again. There is no hope for me with my desire of some cameras. Incidentally, I have always fancied having a go with a Zeiss Ikon Bullseye, but have never owned one and of course a Reid and Sigrist, but if I ever got one of those my M2 may sulk with jealousy.

Thomas Bertilsson
07-18-2012, 02:17 PM
I have about 10 cameras, but it is only when I take the M2 out do I feel I have to do some serious work. I never have time to use all the others and often think about selling one or two. However, when I pick them up and enjoy the tactile sensation of their mechanics and admire their individual design, I just put them away again. There is no hope for me with my desire of some cameras. Incidentally, I have always fancied having a go with a Zeiss Ikon Bullseye, but have never owned one and of course a Reid and Sigrist, but if I ever got one of those my M2 may sulk with jealousy.

I can understand that, and my own photography is much the same way, except the Hasselblad gets a lot of mileage for serious work too.

The way I see it I feel kind of connected to the Hassleblad and the Leica. When I use those cameras it's as though they are not an obstruction in my work flow anymore, but more of a direct link between the subject matter and my brain. It feels that way when I photograph, and I can sort of sense the entire work flow rush through my blood as I compose a shot, what a print might look like. With these cameras it feels intuitive, like an extension of my senses, and out of the cameras I own they are the ones that gel with the way I work. As soon as I pick up a different camera, I have to actually think about what I'm doing, and that does screw it up for me - royally. As soon as I have to think about what I'm doing, my 'hit rate' of good frames per roll goes down. So, the conclusion is that it simply doesn't make sense for me to get a different camera, which relates back to your comment of admiring the cameras for what they are, but when you want something to truly use, you use what you know the best.

cliveh
07-18-2012, 02:30 PM
I can understand that, and my own photography is much the same way, except the Hasselblad gets a lot of mileage for serious work too.

The way I see it I feel kind of connected to the Hassleblad and the Leica. When I use those cameras it's as though they are not an obstruction in my work flow anymore, but more of a direct link between the subject matter and my brain. It feels that way when I photograph, and I can sort of sense the entire work flow rush through my blood as I compose a shot, what a print might look like. With these cameras it feels intuitive, like an extension of my senses, and out of the cameras I own they are the ones that gel with the way I work. As soon as I pick up a different camera, I have to actually think about what I'm doing, and that does screw it up for me - royally. As soon as I have to think about what I'm doing, my 'hit rate' of good frames per roll goes down. So, the conclusion is that it simply doesn't make sense for me to get a different camera, which relates back to your comment of admiring the cameras for what they are, but when you want something to truly use, you use what you know the best.

Thomas, totally agree, when I handle and use the M2 it feels like part of me. Even when using the gIII I have to think about the difference, thus destroying what could be a Zen moment. That may sound to some like pretentious crap, but to me it isn't.

nicholai
07-18-2012, 03:07 PM
I have my SLR systems i use for serious photography, my Mamiya RB67 PRO S and my OM-20, for 35mm shots.
Then i've got a shitload of other cameras ive bought from second hand stores. Theyre usually around 10$. Some film is even more than that! I shoot a roll or two on each, and let them sit. Some i use a bit more, like my holga 135bc.

Sirius Glass
07-18-2012, 03:45 PM
I can understand that, and my own photography is much the same way, except the Hasselblad gets a lot of mileage for serious work too.

Obviously a man with good taste!

Someonenameddavid
08-05-2012, 04:53 PM
I have centered my collection on 1954 which, IMHO was one of the Golden Years for cameras: so I have an M3 DS with collapsible Summicron.... I really don't need anything else. But I fell for GAS and got great deals on a Contax IIa color dial and IIIa color dials (( would like to trade one of them for a IIIf RDST with 50mm Elmar))'and I have a Super Ikonta B and BXMX . I will probably never get a Reid in the US but I have the next best thing: a Bell and Howell Foton with T2.2 Cooke lens ( a little older than 1954 (1949) but one of these days the right buyer will come along

David

m1tch
11-30-2012, 03:00 AM
I go with unusual cameras like the GOMZ Sputnik stereo-graphic (3D) camera, or the Zenit Photosniper, all of my cameras are usable ranging from a 1960s Ilford Sportsman, through to a 1940s Bessa folding camera, I just buy what I like, which usually involves avoiding newer more plastic cameras as the older cameras as usually built to last. I don't buy anything that I won't be able to shoot ie not 127 or 110s etc but go with 35mm, 120 roll and 5x4 film, I just like cameras where you go: "wow, thats neat looking" and some of the older cameras have some pretty clever features which never caught on - example being the Ilford Sportsman, it has the shutter release on the front of the camera exactly where your finger usually sits. Its on the front as when you press it in it doesn't jar the camera in 1 corner so it takes a more stable image vs pressed down on the top corner like all other cameras.

DrTang
03-05-2013, 01:21 PM
well..I started buying Italian Cameras from the 50's and 60's and quickly ran out of ones I could afford

then I started in on 50's and 60's rangefinders of all sorts - for the same reason: design and build quality


ran out of THOSE I can afford..so now I'm looking at 3 lens movie cameras 8 and 16

I try to get the best example I can afford..but that might be a gutted (but outwardly good looking) foton - for example

atoyot
06-16-2013, 10:59 PM
I sort of accidentally stumbled into collecting, but as a previous film user, I just got more interested in rangefinders, more specifically, the cheaper Japanese RF's. Since then, I've added a few different types, including some SLR,s, but not just limited to 35mm. I've got a couple of Fuji GSW690III's, a Pentax 645 with 75, 45 and 120 macro lens (and an adapter for my digital Canon - I hope that's not a dirty word around here!), a couple of 110's, inc Pentax and Minolta, and a few 35mm's as well. Canon QL17GIII (Black), Konica Auto S3, s2 and s1, Ricoh Super Shot, Minolta 11. and about 10 Yashica's, everything from an MG, Electro to GTN and Lymx 14IC. Not all work but most do, and depending on how I feel, I'll just grab one and put a roll through it. I just love using them. As to my guidelines, if I want it and can afford it, I will. I haven't gone anywhere near Leica's and the like yet (I've got an XPan though), but I probably will sometime soon.

benjiboy
06-20-2013, 11:06 AM
I've never understood what collecting cameras was for, I've never wanted to turn my small house into a museum, the only cameras I own are the ones I shoot regularly with. People of course can spend their disposable income on whatever they wish, but I prefer to spend the money on having my cameras serviced occasionally to keep them in first class working order, and not buy more and more, because the more stuff you have the more you have to worry about, I sold three cameras and two light meters recently and found it a very liberating experience