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LJH
05-06-2012, 05:09 PM
I also see that for a little over a thousand you can get a complete camera (minus lens). I have no idea what the quality is like, but it is a bargain if the quality is decent

My DaYi 617 is built like a tank. No issues with it whatsoever. Good roll film back on it as well (twin pressure plates make sure that the film's kept flat).

I recently got a 72mm cone for it so that I can travel with it. I pack it in my checked luggage as there is no chance it'll get damaged. It is simply too tough for that. Obviously, I don't have the lens attached when doing this; it comes on in my hand luggage.

The shift function comes in pretty handy at times as well. This is made easy as this camera comes with a ground glass. Pretty good quality and easy to use as it clips on to the back of the camera when the film back is unclipped and removed.

It also comes with 2 sets of baffles so that you can change formats (6x15 and 6x12cm).

PKM-25
05-07-2012, 01:22 PM
Pano is definitely fun and can yield unique images if you step out of the cliche box. I use both a Hasselblad XPan and stitch with a Dee-ate-hundred depending on what I or a client needs...

For example, last week I shot an ad campaign that involved some action / movement in which the client wanted a panoramic image for a book mark, magazine ad and medium sized print for a private school. She also wanted it in black and white and to look "Dreamy". So I chose my Xpan loaded with Kodak High Speed Infrared. I made a 20" wide darkroom print and scanned the neg, stitching made no sense here..

A few months ago, I got a commission to shoot a 9' x 18' foot Winter landscape mural for a luxury home to be output on large translucent panels. The company that creates the output would settle for 150dpi but preferred 200dpi. So I opted to create a stitched panoramic of over 40,000 pixels across which came out to right about 18 feet wide at 200 dpi.

I almost always prefer to shoot with the Xpan with panoramic images in mind, but have no issues with making a monstrous image out of a stitched image. I have even shot medium format film images with stitching in mind since I seem to get commercial requests of up to 20' feet wide on an annual basis.

On another note, you might want to check out a book called Searching for True North (http://www.modernbook.com/geirjordahl.htm) by Geir Jordahl, it has to be some of my favorite panoramic imagery. It was all shot on Infrared with an XPan...

Enjoy s t r e t c h i n g your imagination!

L Gebhardt
05-07-2012, 10:06 PM
The 6x17 roll film backs work reasonably well on a 4x5 camera, as long as you are happy with your longest lens being about 180mm. And the process is slower than with a dedicated 6x17 camera. But then you get movements so that is nice. Plus you can shoot 4x5 on the camera too. I use a 90mm f/6.8 Rodenstock lens on mine a lot. The main issue I have is the corners are very dim on the ground glass. A fresnel would probably help that. Also a faster lens would be another option.

paulie
05-08-2012, 04:07 AM
use a 4x5 and make a darkslide with a panoramic slot cut into it, its cheap and it works

Ian Grant
05-08-2012, 07:10 AM
The 6x17 roll film backs work reasonably well on a 4x5 camera, as long as you are happy with your longest lens being about 180mm. And the process is slower than with a dedicated 6x17 camera. But then you get movements so that is nice. Plus you can shoot 4x5 on the camera too. I use a 90mm f/6.8 Rodenstock lens on mine a lot. The main issue I have is the corners are very dim on the ground glass. A fresnel would probably help that. Also a faster lens would be another option.

That's a very good point. When I bought my 617 camera I had cones etc for 90mm & 75mm lenses but found I never used the 90mm, for my uses I prefer the 75mm. In terms of perspective it's close to by TLR's (Yashicamat & Rolleiflex).

TI thought about a conversion back but it would have been totally unsuited to my style of working. In addition I often have to work hand held and this is where a dedicated camera comes into its own.

Ian

Sirius Glass
05-10-2012, 08:04 PM
Welcome to APUG, Mazen!

Marc B.
05-10-2012, 10:18 PM
Mazen,

Before 'going-all-in'...acquiring new/special equipment for panoramas,
try doing some panoramas with the equipment you already have.

Learning the "Nodal Point or Entrance Pupil" of your existing equipment,
and learning how to control it - using the entrance/nodal point to your
advantage - will go a long way towards your goal.

The threads and tutorials linked below apply whether using
film capture, digital capture, or a combined hybrid workflow.

Many of these articles also contain further links to 'Panoramic Stitching & HDR Programs,'
all of which work better if the camera's entrance pupil was properly established, prior to capture.

Turn on some music, prop your feet up, and read.

Marc


http://dgrin.smugmug.com/gallery/2114189

http://www.4directions.org/resources/features/qtvr_tutorial/NodalPoint.htm

http://www.rosaurophotography.com/html/technical7.html

http://www.johnhpanos.com/epcalib.htm

epp
06-02-2012, 01:13 PM
Have you looked at the Holga panoramic cameras?

http://www.freestylephoto.biz/231135-Holga-135-Pan-35mm-Panoramic-Camera
http://www.freestylephoto.biz/200120-Holga-120-Pan-Panoramic-Camera

Both of these cameras are under 100.00 USD and would be an inexpensive way to try panoramic photography. Good luck.