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mazen
05-05-2012, 03:28 AM
Hello,
I have been thinking for the last two years about going film cameras. I Do landscape mainly, and I have been using DSLR cameras ( Canon). I have always wanted to do panoramic photography with a camera like Linhof or fuji, and I have been saving the money in the last two years and I will be able to get a camera within one year.
I have always asked myself, Is it really worth what I am doing? I answered yes, since this is the thing I wanna do and I want to turn it in business.
Anyway, since I have this plan in my mind, I want to familiarize myself with film photography. But I have zero knowledge about this area. So
1-is there any source where I can learn more about film photography ?
2- What is the range of shutter speed on those panoramic cameras like linhof technorama 617s iii?, and does it depend on the body or the lens?.
3- How can I control the shutter speed, and aperture? Is the controlling done through the lens itself?
4- When I develop a color film, can I scan the negative to my computer and get the picture and print it?,
5-what is a type of good scanner and how much does it cost?
6- I know when I buy a body like linhof or fuji I need basically a lens, center filter, and a case. What else?
7- Whats a light meter, How can I use it, and Is it essential in this type of photography?.

Thank You
Mazen

Jesper
05-05-2012, 03:56 AM
Have you considered a swing lens camera such as Widelux or Noblex?

Ian Grant
05-05-2012, 04:08 AM
Welcome to APUG Mazen.

The best way to learn would be to find someone near you with a Panoramic camera who can show you a camera in use - so it would help to say where you're located. I use a Gaoersi 6x17 camera with a 75mm lens and it's great format. You control the exposure with the shutter and aperture of the lens itself, you need a separate light meter.

Ian

jordanstarr
05-05-2012, 04:10 AM
...is the landscape photography market vibrant enough to justify saving money for 3 years for a film camera to use only for landscapes? I thought people go into film for the love of film. I didn't think there was much money in it. My point being, are you going into it with the right intensions or should you look at panoramic options for your digital (ie. stitching frames in photoshop)?

ChuckP
05-05-2012, 09:09 AM
Look at scanners first. A good quality professional scanner to take medium format probably will cost as much as the camera.

David Brown
05-05-2012, 09:55 AM
4- When I develop a color film, can I scan the negative to my computer and get the picture and print it?,
5-what is a type of good scanner and how much does it cost?

These really are questions for our sister site: DPUG. We do not normally discuss digital technical matters here. However, yes, you can scan color film. If you're going to do that and print digitally, why not just shoot digital in the first place?

Mark Fisher
05-05-2012, 11:10 AM
You may want to start by trying out a roll film camera that can shoot 6x9 format and crop it. This will teach you how to use a meter properly, scanning film, and use a manual camera. There are pretty inexpensive cameras out there that could shoot 6x9 like a Mamiya 23 or an old folding camera. You could probably learn 80% of what you'd need to learn that way and you can always sell the camera at the end if you wanted to.

Jeff Kubach
05-05-2012, 12:37 PM
Is there a community college near where you live, if so you can learn about film photograthy.

Jeff

M.A.Longmore
05-05-2012, 12:50 PM
.
Welcome Home Mazen !

Ron
.

zsas
05-05-2012, 01:02 PM
Welcome to film! You will live it! Like Mark says, maybe get a cheap 6x9 folder and get you hands wet. I highly suggest a copy of the below, which can be found used for less than a cup of coffee....

Black and White Photography: A Basic Manual by Henry Horenstein and Carol Keller (May 30, 1983)

LJH
05-05-2012, 03:08 PM
Where are you based? Perhaps there is someone around your area who can show you some of the ropes?

jnanian
05-05-2012, 03:41 PM
hi mazen

rather than investing thousands of dollars,
you might consider getting a smaller format camera
and just cropping your view. until you decide it is really
what you want to do, and then get a dedicated system like ian suggests.
there are lots of scanners ( refurbished epsons are great ) that allow you to
scan film ... and seeing how there are fewer and fewer color labs that do optical wet darkroom work
that might a way to go. it seems you already know your way around the software .. it is a matter of
the hardware ( some of the other sites might be able to suggest scanners for you. depending on your format, some are more useful than others ) ...

have fun !
john

mazen
05-06-2012, 01:31 AM
Thank You all,
First of all I am from Columbia-Missouri,
I really appreciate your replies.
based on what you said, I think the right thing is to buy a reasonable camera and learn the basics and then move to other panoramic cameras.
What would be a recommended camera to buy that is a med. format camera and takes 6X17 film backs, what lenses too?. I am starting from scratch, so What do I need along the camera to start shooting with it?
some people mention Gaoersi 617 and mayama 23, I looked them up on H&B and Adorma but did not see them, Where Can I find them?

Thank you

lxdude
05-06-2012, 04:05 AM
These really are questions for our sister site: DPUG. We do not normally discuss digital technical matters here. However, yes, you can scan color film. If you're going to do that and print digitally, why not just shoot digital in the first place?

Panoramic with digital is not as straightforward as with panoramic film cameras. Stitching is a hassle to do and to set up and take shots for and doesn't work well with any scene that is not static.

Ian Grant
05-06-2012, 04:33 AM
Panoramic with digital is not as straightforward as with panoramic film cameras. Stitching is a hassle to do and to set up and take shots for and doesn't work well with any scene that is not static.

A few photographers who specialised in Panoramas using 6x17 went completely digital but have returned to using film again. There's inherrent problems with perspective in stitched images and more importantly it's useless if there's any movement. Try stitching a panoramic seascpe with waves rollong in :D

Ian

Newt_on_Swings
05-06-2012, 06:50 AM
Cropping 6x9 or making a pinhole panoramic would be the cheapest options.

6x17 LF and Xpan are very elegant but expensive options.

M.A.Longmore
05-06-2012, 09:09 AM
.
An inexpensive 4 X 5 camera with, an expensive Dayi 6 X 17 Roll Film Adapter
might be an affordable solution. And it's adjustable to 6 X 14, and 6 X 12 also.
When I get older, and my testicles develop, I might even consider buying that ...

Dayi 6 X 17 Roll Film Adapter:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Dayi-617-Film-roll-holder-for-4-5-45-Linhof-camera-/230635705227?pt=Film_Cameras&hash=item35b2f5938b#ht_4115wt_932

Has anyone ever purchased a Dayi Roll Film Adapter ?
I would love to get a review on the quality, and construction of their devices.


Ron
.

rthomas
05-06-2012, 09:35 AM
I have a couple of pretty inexpensive suggestions:

1) Use a cut-down extra darkslide on a medium or large format camera to get a negative about the size of an X-pan negative. I did this on my RB67 to get an image roughly 26x70mm. I am planning to do it with my 4x5" monorail as well, getting about 2x5. You get two images per frame this way.

Here's a sample of that work from the RB67:

50569

2) Some medium format cameras have 35mm panoramic backs that are far cheaper than an X-pan, and you also get a regular medium format camera in the bargain. I know the Bronica medium format SLRs have this option.

And another thing - I didn't see a tripod mentioned in your list (I have been known to miss things...). Anyway you'll want a sturdy tripod, especially if you go with one of the larger cameras.

lxdude
05-06-2012, 12:28 PM
A few photographers who specialised in Panoramas using 6x17 went completely digital but have returned to using film again. There's inherrent problems with perspective in stitched images and more importantly it's useless if there's any movement. Try stitching a panoramic seascpe with waves rollong in :D

Ian
Exactly!

Mark Fisher
05-06-2012, 04:43 PM
.
An inexpensive 4 X 5 camera with, an expensive Dayi 6 X 17 Roll Film Adapter
might be an affordable solution. And it's adjustable to 6 X 14, and 6 X 12 also.
When I get older, and my testicles develop, I might even consider buying that ...

Dayi 6 X 17 Roll Film Adapter:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-Dayi-617-Film-roll-holder-for-4-5-45-Linhof-camera-/230635705227?pt=Film_Cameras&hash=item35b2f5938b#ht_4115wt_932

Has anyone ever purchased a Dayi Roll Film Adapter ?
I would love to get a review on the quality, and construction of their devices.


Ron
.

I also see that for a little over a thousand you can get a complete camera (minus lens). I have no idea what the quality is like, but it is a bargain if the quality is decent